13

The following code is, as far as I understand it, undefined behavior according to the c++ standard (section 7.1.5.1.4 [dcl.type.cv]/4 in particular).

#include <iostream>

struct F;
F* g;

struct F {
    F() : val(5)
    {
        g = this;
    }
    int val;
};


const F f;

int main() {
    g->val = 8;
    std::cout << f.val << std::endl;
}

However, this prints '8' with every compiler and optimization setting I have tried.

Question: Is there an example that will exhibit unexpected results with this type of "implicit const_cast"?

I am hoping for something as spectacular as the results of

#include <iostream>
int main() {
    for (int i = 0; i <=4; ++i)
        std::cout << i * 1000000000 << std::endl;
}

on, e.g., gcc 4.8.5 with -O2

EDIT: the relevant section from the standard

7.1.5.1.4: Except that any class member declared mutable (7.1.1) can be modified, any attempt to modify a const object during its lifetime (3.8) results in undefined behavior.

In reply to the comment suggesting a duplicate; it is not a duplicate because I am asking for an example where "unexpected" results occur.

  • 2
    That's a very devious setup - very nice. – Kerrek SB Jun 8 '16 at 16:59
  • 7
    I do like the symptoms of that snippet at the bottom. Zero, one, two, release the Kraken ! – Quentin Jun 8 '16 at 16:59
  • 3
    What is the value in trying to define undefined behavior? – lcs Jun 8 '16 at 16:59
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Why does C++ not have a const constructor? – Jean-Baptiste Yunès Jun 8 '16 at 17:04
  • 1
    @Kaz Unfortunately, "fixes" that break previously valid code is against the principles of C++. And even then, even by today's standards, the fact that C++ allows "hacks" of this sort is one of the selling features of the language, as it allows some people to ship their projects on time no matter the issues you get at the last minute, even at the cost of maintenability. Nice off-topic rant, though – KABoissonneault Jun 8 '16 at 17:58
7

Not as spectacular:

f.h (guards omitted):

struct F;
extern F* g;

struct F {
    F() : val(5)
    {
        g = this;
    }
    int val;
};

extern const F f;
void h();

TU1:

#include "f.h"
// definitions
F* g;
const F f;
void h() {}    

TU2:

#include "f.h"
#include <iostream>
int main() {
    h(); // ensure that globals have been initialized
    int val = f.val;
    g->val = 8;
    std::cout << (f.val == val) << '\n';
}

Prints 1 when compiled with g++ -O2, and 0 when compiled with -O0.

0

The main case of "undefined" behavior would be that typically, if someone sees const, they will assume that it does not change. So, const_cast intentionally does something that many libraries and programs would either not expect to be done or consider as explicit undefined behavior. It's important to remember that not all undefined behavior comes from the standard alone, even if that is the typical usage of the term.

That said, I was able to locate a place in the standard library where such thinking can be applied to do something I believe would more narrowly be considered undefined behavior: generating an std::map with "duplicate keys":

#include "iostream"
#include "map"

int main( )
{
    std::map< int, int > aMap;

    aMap[ 10 ] = 1;
    aMap[ 20 ] = 2;

    *const_cast< int* >( &aMap.find( 10 )->first ) = 20;

    std::cout << "Iteration:" << std::endl;
    for( std::map< int,int >::iterator i = aMap.begin(); i != aMap.end(); ++i )
        std::cout << i->first << " : " << i->second << std::endl;

    std::cout << std::endl << "Subscript Access:" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "aMap[ 10 ]" << " : " << aMap[ 10 ] << std::endl;
    std::cout << "aMap[ 20 ]" << " : " << aMap[ 20 ] << std::endl;

    std::cout << std::endl << "Iteration:" << std::endl;
    for( std::map< int,int >::iterator i = aMap.begin(); i != aMap.end(); ++i )
        std::cout << i->first << " : " << i->second << std::endl;
}

The output is:

Iteration:
20 : 1
20 : 2

Subscript Access:
aMap[ 10 ] : 0
aMap[ 20 ] : 1

Iteration:
10 : 0
20 : 1
20 : 2

Built with g++.exe (Rev5, Built by MSYS2 project) 5.3.0.

Obviously, there is a mismatch between the access keys and the key values in the stored pairs. It also seems that the 20:2 pair is not accessible except via iteration.

My guess is that this is happening because map is implemented as a tree. Changing the value leaves it where it initially was (where 10 would go), so it does not overwrite the other 20 key. At the same time, adding an actual 10 does not overwrite the old 10 because on checking the key value, it's not actually the same

I do not have a standard to look at right now, but I would expect this violates the definition of map on a few levels.

It might also lead to worse behavior, but with my compiler/OS combo I was unable to get it to do anything more extreme, like crash.

  • @T.C. Can't really give citations for undefined behavior, but I was wrong about that point. I investigated in some more depth and added that as an edit. The real situation is stranger. – user3995702 Jun 8 '16 at 18:59
  • What is soft undefined behavior? – nwp Jun 8 '16 at 20:44
  • If you mess with the internals of a class in a way that violates its contract and upsets its invariants, of course it's going to break down, whether or not const_cast is used in the process. – T.C. Jun 8 '16 at 20:46
  • @T.C. Exactly the point, except that doing this with standard-defined functionality becomes undefined behavior. – user3995702 Jun 8 '16 at 20:48
  • @nwp I explained it in the second half of that sentence. It lets you easily break things which assume you are going to obey normal conventions. It isn't quite undefined behavior in the sense the standard says it is undefined / doesn't define it, but it almost always is in the sense individual programs/libraries would be extremely easily broken by using it. But that said, when you do it on the standard, in my opinion that becomes entirely "undefined behavior". You are doing things that the standard has not defined with what it has provided. And obviously, it isn't properly handled. – user3995702 Jun 8 '16 at 20:49

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