1

I have a database that includes the following tables:

  • User
  • Category
  • Article

Inside our website we have a section called "editors pick" that has 5 of the best articles chosen by editors on that area.

Editors must set "is_recommended = yes" and also "recommended_location" which can be either 1,2,3,4, or 5; accordingly they will be placed on one of those 1-5 placements on the website.

Articles also have a "start_date" meaning the author can write an article assign it as is_recommended = yes and recommended_location = 3 and then set it for tomorrow 9pm. Therefore the article will only appear tomorrow and when it does it should sit on the 3 box of the editors pick.

Sometimes we may have an article such as below:

  • ID: 123
  • is_recommended: yes
  • recommended_location = 3
  • start_date = 06-05-2016 09:00:00 (let's say this is yesterday)

Which is currently holding the #3 spot.

I have another article:

  • ID: 456
  • is_recommended: yes
  • recommended_location = 3
  • start_date = 07-05-2016 09:00:00 (this is today and today it is already 11am)

However my query still continues to show ID: 123; while I want it to show the one in slot #3 that is the newest (meaning 456)

Can someone tell me what I am doing wrong in my query below, how can I assure that for each slot the newest item is selected?

This is the query:

select * 
from (
    select article.*, user.username, category.title as ctitle, user.firstname, user.lastname, category.slug as cslug, category.category_id as pid 
    from article 
    left join user on article.created_by = user.id 
    left join category on category.id = article.category_id 
    where article.status='active' 
    AND is_recommended='yes' 
    AND article.start_date<='".date('Y-m-d H:i:s')."' 
    AND recommended_location in (1,2,3,4,5) 
    order by start_date desc
 ) as x 
 group by recommended_location 
 limit 5
4
  • you should have an end_date comparison as well even if it meant manually adding 1 day to start_date. that way you can use something like date BETWEEN start_date AND end_date...so there's no confusion between what rows should be returned.
    – Tin Tran
    Commented Jun 8, 2016 at 19:22
  • @Turo has the solution you want. It's a non-trivial problem you are trying to solve. Read this article about trying to solve this type of problem
    – AgRizzo
    Commented Jun 8, 2016 at 19:53
  • Thanks @AgRizzo this is exactly the problem. Now to put 2+2 together. Commented Jun 8, 2016 at 20:17
  • @TinTran but it does not make sense for our system, end dates are unclear and actually non-existant. Once an article is live it needs to stay live. Commented Jun 8, 2016 at 20:18

3 Answers 3

2

You havent't aggregation function so you don't need group by (eventually use distinct if this is what you need)

select * 
from (    select article.*, user.username, category.title as ctitle, user.firstname, user.lastname, category.slug as cslug, category.category_id as pid 
    from article 
    left join user on article.created_by = user.id 
    left join category on category.id = article.category_id 
    where article.status='active' 
    AND is_recommended='yes' 
    AND article.start_date<='".date('Y-m-d H:i:s')."' 
    AND recommended_location in (1,2,3,4,5) 
    order by start_date desc
 ) as x 
 limit 5

If you want only a article for each recommended_location you should use

(select article.*, user.username, category.title as ctitle, user.firstname, user.lastname, category.slug as cslug, category.category_id as pid 
from article 
left join user on article.created_by = user.id 
left join category on category.id = article.category_id 
where article.status='active' 
AND is_recommended='yes' 
AND article.start_date<='".date('Y-m-d H:i:s')."' 
AND recommended_location = '1' 
order by start_date desc limit 1)
union
(select article.*, user.username, category.title as ctitle, user.firstname, user.lastname, category.slug as cslug, category.category_id as pid 
from article 
left join user on article.created_by = user.id 
left join category on category.id = article.category_id 
where article.status='active' 
AND is_recommended='yes' 
AND article.start_date<='".date('Y-m-d H:i:s')."' 
AND recommended_location = '2' 
order by start_date desc limit 1)
union 
(select article.*, user.username, category.title as ctitle, user.firstname, user.lastname, category.slug as cslug, category.category_id as pid 
from article 
left join user on article.created_by = user.id 
left join category on category.id = article.category_id 
where article.status='active' 
AND is_recommended='yes' 
AND article.start_date<='".date('Y-m-d H:i:s')."' 
AND recommended_location = '3' 
order by start_date desc limit 1)   
union 
(select article.*, user.username, category.title as ctitle, user.firstname, user.lastname, category.slug as cslug, category.category_id as pid 
from article 
left join user on article.created_by = user.id 
left join category on category.id = article.category_id 
where article.status='active' 
AND is_recommended='yes' 
AND article.start_date<='".date('Y-m-d H:i:s')."' 
AND recommended_location = '4' 
order by start_date desc limit 1)  
union 
(select article.*, user.username, category.title as ctitle, user.firstname, user.lastname, category.slug as cslug, category.category_id as pid 
from article 
left join user on article.created_by = user.id 
left join category on category.id = article.category_id 
where article.status='active' 
AND is_recommended='yes' 
AND article.start_date<='".date('Y-m-d H:i:s')."' 
AND recommended_location = '5' 
order by start_date desc limit 1)  
6
  • Thank you. Unfortunately this is not generating the right results. I need to get the latest item per recommended_location; however this query is getting them and placing them randomly; I now have two items in the 1-5 that are set as recommended_location = 3 Commented Jun 8, 2016 at 20:11
  • I have yet to check if this works but won't this be a massive load on server? We have over 100K users on the site and I am trying to find ways to optimize. I understand we can cache but generally a query this long is quite scary to say the least. Commented Jun 8, 2016 at 20:20
  • It is working ... I am contemplating if it is the right way to go ahead or not. Commented Jun 8, 2016 at 20:21
  • well if this answer working is a good result .. then i think this is at least useful .. I think in that case (one element for each category ) .. the select union with limit is the simple (or the unique) solution..
    – ScaisEdge
    Commented Jun 8, 2016 at 20:25
  • I appreciate your help on this. It saves us for a short period while we find the long period answer. Commented Jun 8, 2016 at 21:04
1

Make the aggregation first and then join the data you need

select x.recommended_location, x.start_date, ... 
from
 ( select article.recommended_location, max(article.start_date) as  start_date 
    from article 
     where article.status='active' 
     AND is_recommended='yes' 
     AND article.start_date<='".date('Y-m-d H:i:s')."' 
    AND recommended_location in (1,2,3,4,5) 
    group by article.recommended_location
 ) as x 
inner join article on x.recommended_location = artice.recommended_location    
and x.start_date = article.start_date
inner join ...

But if 2 or more articles have the same start_date, you will get all of them this way...

0

Try this :

Use article.id with descending order in query

so your query is like this :

select * 
from (
    select article.*, user.username, category.title as ctitle, user.firstname, user.lastname, category.slug as cslug, category.category_id as pid 
    from article 
    left join user on article.created_by = user.id 
    left join category on category.id = article.category_id 
    where article.status='active' 
    AND is_recommended='yes' 
    AND article.start_date<='".date('Y-m-d H:i:s')."' 
    AND recommended_location in (1,2,3,4,5) 
    order by article.ID desc, recommended_location desc, start_date desc
 ) as x 
 group by recommended_location 
 limit 5

I hope you will get solution.

1
  • Thanks for this, unfortunately it is not giving me the result I am looking for. Commented Jun 8, 2016 at 20:09

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