3

I was just toying with the concept of modifying arguments inside a Perl subroutine without using references. I tried this in case of arrays :

sub test {
  print "Trying to change ... \n";
  $_[0] = "Third";
  $_[1] = 100;
}

@a = ("First", 1, "Second", 2);

print "Before change : @a \n";
test(@a);
print "After change : @a \n";

Output:

Before change : First 1 Second 2
Trying to change ...
After change : Third 100 Second 2

In other words the elements of an array is changed by changing the values of @_.

But doing the same in case of hashes does not give the intended behavior:

sub test {
  print "Trying to change ... \n";
  $_[0] = "Third";
  $_[1] = 100;
}

%h = ("First" => 1, "Second" => 2);

test(%h);

foreach ( keys %h ) {
  print "$_\n";
}

Output :

Trying to change ...
Second
First

Why is this thing different in the two cases?

2

Perl will pass by reference all the time.

So, in the array example, each element is passed as a reference (since the input to a sub is just a 'list of scalers' ie an array). Therefore when you update an element in the sub, your actually changing the value that references the value in the original array.

In the example of the hash, when Perl sees a hash passed into a sub, it knows it can't send a hash, so converts it to a 'list of scalers' representation of the hash data - which is critical not a reference to the original data. This representation is passed by reference to the sub, which you update. As such you don't update the original data, as you did with a simple array.

  • However, the value you can change, just not the keys. – zdim Jun 9 '16 at 7:48
  • " it knows it can't send a hash, so converts it to a 'list of scalers' representation of the hash data - which is critical not a reference to the original data." This isn't strictly true. A hash in list context is converted to a list of keys and values. The keys have to be copied from internal C-strings to Perl scalars, but the values are already Perl scalars and are just passed as they are. See my own solution – Borodin Jun 9 '16 at 13:54
3

You have been slightly misled

Perl hash keys aren't ordinary Perl scalar values -- they are stored as a simple C string for speed, but hash values are Perl scalars

In a call like test(%h) Perl creates a temporary Perl scalar out of each hash key string and passes those, together with the real hash value scalars

That means that any attempt to modify the key strings will change only the temporary scalars, and won't be reflected in the hash. But your code does change the values

Here's a version that dumps the whole hash before and after the subroutine call. You can see that the string Third has been lost, but 100 has been assigned to a (random) hash value

use strict;
use warnings 'all';

use Data::Dump 'pp';

sub test {
  $_[0] = "Third";
  $_[1] = 100;
}

my %h = ("First" => 1, "Second" => 2);

printf "Before: %s\n", pp \%h;
test(%h);
printf "After:  %s\n", pp \%h;

output

Before: { First => 1, Second => 2 }
After:  { First => 1, Second => 100 }
  • Thanks @Borodin for providing useful knowledge. – Arijit Panda Jun 10 '16 at 1:57
2

Array declaration and Hash declaration is not same thing. When you are doing $_[0] = "Third"; in the hash function , then you are not changing the hash content. It is for array only.

To remove the First key . you need to delete it using delete operator and then add your third key. So, Its not possible without reference.

  • 1
    @SubhayanBhattacharya I like it that you wish to thank people but see What should I do when someone answers my question? – zdim Jun 9 '16 at 7:48
  • "When you are doing $_[0] = "Third"; in the hash function , then you are not changing the hash content. It is for array only." Yes, but the OP has discovered that. Their question is "Why is this thing different in the two cases?" – Borodin Jun 9 '16 at 13:56

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