107

I have a asp.net core application that uses dependency injection defined in the startup.cs class of the application:

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {

        services.AddDbContext<ApplicationDbContext>(options =>
            options.UseSqlServer(Configuration["Data:FotballConnection:DefaultConnection"]));


        // Repositories
        services.AddScoped<IUserRepository, UserRepository>();
        services.AddScoped<IUserRoleRepository, UserRoleRepository>();
        services.AddScoped<IRoleRepository, RoleRepository>();
        services.AddScoped<ILoggingRepository, LoggingRepository>();

        // Services
        services.AddScoped<IMembershipService, MembershipService>();
        services.AddScoped<IEncryptionService, EncryptionService>();

        // new repos
        services.AddScoped<IMatchService, MatchService>();
        services.AddScoped<IMatchRepository, MatchRepository>();
        services.AddScoped<IMatchBetRepository, MatchBetRepository>();
        services.AddScoped<ITeamRepository, TeamRepository>();

        services.AddScoped<IFootballAPI, FootballAPIService>();

This allows something like this:

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class MatchController : AuthorizedController
{
    private readonly IMatchService _matchService;
    private readonly IMatchRepository _matchRepository;
    private readonly IMatchBetRepository _matchBetRepository;
    private readonly IUserRepository _userRepository;
    private readonly ILoggingRepository _loggingRepository;

    public MatchController(IMatchService matchService, IMatchRepository matchRepository, IMatchBetRepository matchBetRepository, ILoggingRepository loggingRepository, IUserRepository userRepository)
    {
        _matchService = matchService;
        _matchRepository = matchRepository;
        _matchBetRepository = matchBetRepository;
        _userRepository = userRepository;
        _loggingRepository = loggingRepository;
    }

This is very neat. But becomes a problem when I want to unit test. Because my test library does not have a startup.cs where I setup dependency injection. So a class with these interfaces as params will just be null.

namespace TestLibrary
{
    public class FootballAPIService
    {
        private readonly IMatchRepository _matchRepository;
        private readonly ITeamRepository _teamRepository;

        public FootballAPIService(IMatchRepository matchRepository, ITeamRepository teamRepository)

        {
            _matchRepository = matchRepository;
            _teamRepository = teamRepository;

In the code above, in the test library, _matchRepository and _teamRepository, will just be null. :(

Can I do something like ConfigureServices, where I define dependency injection in my test library project?

1
  • 2
    As part of your test you should setup the dependencies for your System Under Test (SUT). Usually you do this by creating mock's of the dependencies before creating the SUT. But to create the SUT simply calling new SUT(mockDependency); is fine for your test. Jun 9 '16 at 11:36
161

Although @Kritner's answer is correct, I prefer the following for code integrity and better DI experience:

[TestClass]
public class MatchRepositoryTests
{
    private readonly IMatchRepository matchRepository;

    public MatchRepositoryTests()
    {
        var services = new ServiceCollection();
        services.AddTransient<IMatchRepository, MatchRepositoryStub>();

        var serviceProvider = services.BuildServiceProvider();

        matchRepository = serviceProvider.GetService<IMatchRepository>();
    }
}
10
  • how did you get the generic GetService<> method?
    – Chazt3n
    Apr 13 '18 at 11:42
  • 6
    GetService<> has some overloads that can be found with using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection Apr 21 '18 at 3:39
  • 16
    I just tested this out. this is a far more valid answer than the marked answer. This uses DI. I tried using this over the same extension function that I use for the website. this feature works perfectly Apr 21 '18 at 22:43
  • Added "using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection" but "AddTransient" is still missing from ServiceCollection. Any1 knows how to fix this? Nov 9 '18 at 21:32
  • 12
    This does not Unit-Test the Service, this is an Integration-Test with Microsofts DI. Microsoft already has unit tests to test DI, so there is no reason to do this. If you want to test that and object is registered, that is a separation of concerns and should be in it's own test. Unit-Testing and object means testing the object itself with no external dependencies. Feb 18 '19 at 17:01
46

A simple way, I wrote a generic dependency resolver helper class and then built the IWebHost in my unit test class.

Generic Dependency Resolver

        using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Hosting;
        using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;
        using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
        using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
        using Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting;
        public class DependencyResolverHelper
        {
            private readonly IWebHost _webHost;
    
            /// <inheritdoc />
            public DependencyResolverHelper(IWebHost webHost) => _webHost = webHost;
    
            public T GetService<T>()
            {
                var serviceScope = _webHost.Services.CreateScope();
                var services = serviceScope.ServiceProvider;
                try
                {
                  var scopedService = services.GetRequiredService<T>();
                  return scopedService;
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                   Console.WriteLine(e);
                   throw;
                }
            }
        }
    }

Unit Test Project:

      [TestFixture]
        public class DependencyResolverTests
        {
            private DependencyResolverHelper _serviceProvider;

            public DependencyResolverTests()
            {

                var webHost = WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder()
                    .UseStartup<Startup>()
                    .Build();
                _serviceProvider = new DependencyResolverHelper(webHost);
            }
    
            [Test]
            public void Service_Should_Get_Resolved()
            {
                
                //Act
                var YourService = _serviceProvider.GetService<IYourService>();
    
                //Assert
                Assert.IsNotNull(YourService);
            }
    

        }
9
  • a nice example about how to replace Autofac with Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection
    – lnaie
    Aug 9 '18 at 9:38
  • Yes, this should be the default answer. We have placed an entire suite testing all the services to be injected, and it works like a charm. Thanks! Dec 8 '18 at 10:20
  • hi @Joshua Duxbury can you help answer this question? stackoverflow.com/questions/57331395/… trying to implement your solution, just sent 100 points looking at your other answers also, thanks !
    – user11860043
    Aug 2 '19 at 20:20
  • 4
    Disposing the scope seems wrong to me - docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… - Once Dispose is called, any scoped services that have been resolved from ServiceProvider will be disposed.. Aug 3 '19 at 4:31
  • 1
    You may need to remove the "using" statement to avoid "disposed object error" on your DBcontexts
    – Mosta
    Aug 24 '19 at 15:39
38

Your controllers in .net core have dependency injection in mind from the start, but this does not mean you are required to use a dependency injection container.

Given a simpler class like:

public class MyController : Controller
{

    private readonly IMyInterface _myInterface;

    public MyController(IMyInterface myInterface)
    {
        _myInterface = myInterface;
    }

    public JsonResult Get()
    {
        return Json(_myInterface.Get());
    }
}

public interface IMyInterface
{
    IEnumerable<MyObject> Get();
}

public class MyClass : IMyInterface
{
    public IEnumerable<MyObject> Get()
    {
        // implementation
    }
}

So in your app, you're using the dependency injection container in your startup.cs, which does nothing more than provide a concretion of MyClass to use when IMyInterface is encountered. This does not mean it is the only way of getting instances of MyController however.

In a unit testing scenario, you can (and should) provide your own implementation (or mock/stub/fake) of IMyInterface as so:

public class MyTestClass : IMyInterface
{
    public IEnumerable<MyObject> Get()
    {
        List<MyObject> list = new List<MyObject>();
        // populate list
        return list;
    }        
}

and in your test:

[TestClass]
public class MyControllerTests
{

    MyController _systemUnderTest;
    IMyInterface _myInterface;

    [TestInitialize]
    public void Setup()
    {
        _myInterface = new MyTestClass();
        _systemUnderTest = new MyController(_myInterface);
    }

}

So for the scope of unit testing MyController, the actual implementation of IMyInterface does not matter (and should not matter), only the interface itself matters. We have provided a "fake" implementation of IMyInterface through MyTestClass, but you could also do this with a mock like through Moq or RhinoMocks.

Bottom line, you do not actually need the dependency injection container to accomplish your tests, only a separate, controllable, implementation/mock/stub/fake of your tested classes dependencies.

7
  • 3
    Perfect answer. I would even go as far as not using a DI container at all ever in your unit test. Offcourse except for unit tests aiming to test the correctness of the DI configuration, like the order of applied decorators for example
    – Ric .Net
    Jun 9 '16 at 18:46
  • 56
    I'm not sure how helpful this is when you have classes upon classes that all need a number of dependencies to be injected. What I'd like to do is be able to register default implementations (or mocks with default behaviors) so that I can instantiate those object graphs without having to setup 30 dependencies first, but rather reconfigure the ones that I need for the test. Jan 13 '18 at 1:46
  • 2
    @Sinaesthetic that's what Testing and Mocking frameworks are for. nUnit allows you to create one-time or run-per-test methods that allow you to mock everything, then in your tests only be concerned with configuring the method you are testing. Actually using DI for a Test means it's not longer a Unit-Test but an Integration-Test with Microsofts (or 3rd Partys) DI. Feb 18 '19 at 17:04
  • 2
    "Actually using DI for a Test means it's not longer a Unit-Test" can't really agree with you there, at least not at face value. Oftentimes, the DI is necessary to simply initialize the class so that the unit can be tested. The point being that the dependencies are mocked so that you can test the unit's behavior around the dependency. I think you might be referring to a scenario where one would be injecting a fully functional dependency, then it might be an integration test, unless the dependencies of that object are also mocked. There are many one-off scenarios that could be discussed. Feb 28 '19 at 2:35
  • 1
    We use dependency injection heavily in our unit tests. We use them extensively for mocking purposes. I'm not sure why at all you would not want to use DI in your tests. We're not software engineering our infrastructure for tests, but rather we're using DI to make it really easy to mock and inject objects that a test would need. And we can fine tune what objects are available in our ServiceCollection from the start. It's particularly helpful for scaffolding, and it's helpful for integration tests too so... yeah I'd be FOR using DI in your tests. Sep 11 '20 at 17:21
14

If you are using the Program.cs + Startup.cs convention and want to get this working quickly you can reuse your existing host builder with a one-liner:

using MyWebProjectNamespace;

public class MyTests
{
    readonly IServiceProvider _services = 
        Program.CreateHostBuilder(new string[] { }).Build().Services; // one liner

    [Test]
    public void GetMyTest()
    {
        var myService = _services.GetRequiredService<IMyService>();
        Assert.IsNotNull(myService);
    }
}

Sample Program.cs file from web project:

using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Hosting;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting;

namespace MyWebProjectNamespace
{
    public class Program
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args) =>
            CreateHostBuilder(args).Build().Run();

        public static IHostBuilder CreateHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
            Host.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
                .ConfigureWebHostDefaults(webBuilder =>
                {
                    webBuilder.UseStartup<Startup>();
                });
    }
}
3
  • 1
    Fabulous! Thank you very much. I can see how setting up a new ServiceCollection in [SetUp] could be useful, or even mocking the dependencies. But really, what I wanna do is use the same service collection used by my web app, and run tests against the same environment. Cheers!
    – Nexus
    Nov 21 '20 at 13:28
  • 1
    Brilliant in it's simplicity!
    – AndyS
    Jun 16 at 10:34
  • 1
    Awesome. Just that one liner got me going fairly quick on bunch of unit tests that I wanted to write. Thank you Matthew!
    – user357086
    Jul 29 at 15:25
2

You can use asp.net core DI and inject mocked instance objects in your tests. Here is a full working example :

For the sake of the example :

  • I only kept the IMatchService dependency from the code snippet of the initial question
  • I added a DoSomething action in the MatchController so that there is someting to test.
  • I added an Add method to the IMatchService and the MatchService classes so that there is soemthing to mock.

Please note that the methods that will have a Setup with Moq should be virtual.

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class MatchController : AuthorizedController
{
  private readonly IMatchService _matchService;

  public MatchController(IMatchService matchService)
  {
    _matchService = matchService;
  }

  public virtual int DoSomething()
  {
    return _matchService.Add(1, 2);
  }
}

public interface IMatchService
{
  int Add(int a, int b);
}

public class MatchService : IMatchService
{
  public virtual int Add(int a, int b)
  {
    return a + b;
  }
}

It's always possible to get the Mock by calling the Mock.Get method. For conveniance for each dependency, I create two properties like MatchService and MockedMatchService.

public class MyTests
{
  protected IMatchService MatchService { get; set; }

  protected Mock<IMatchService> MockedMatchService => Mock.Get(MatchService);

  private IServiceProvider ServicesProvider { get; set; }

  [SetUp]
  public void SetupBeforeEachTest()
  {
    // Configure DI container
    ServiceCollection services = new ServiceCollection();
    ConfigureServices(services);
    ServicesProvider = services.BuildServiceProvider();

    // Use DI to get instances of IMatchService
    MatchService = ServicesProvider.GetService<IMatchService>();
  }

  // In this test I mock the Add method of the dependency (IMatchService) so that it returns a value I choose
  [Test]
  public void TestMethod()
  {
    // Prepare
    var matchController = ServicesProvider.GetService<MatchController>();
    int expectedResult = 5;
    MockedMatchService.Setup(x => x.Add(It.IsAny<int>(), It.IsAny<int>())).Returns(expectedResult);

    // Act - This will call the real DoSomething method because the MatchController has comes from a Mock with CallBase = true
    int result = matchController.DoSomething();

    // Check
    Assert.AreEqual(expectedResult, result);
  }

  private static void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
  {
    services.AddScoped<IMatchService>();
    services.AddScoped<MatchController>();
  }
}
0

Why would you want to inject those in a test class? You would usually test the MatchController, for example, by using a tool like RhinoMocks to create stubs or mocks. Here's an example using that and MSTest, from which you can extrapolate:

[TestClass]
public class MatchControllerTests
{
    private readonly MatchController _sut;
    private readonly IMatchService _matchService;

    public MatchControllerTests()
    {
        _matchService = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IMatchService>();
        _sut = new ProductController(_matchService);
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void DoSomething_WithCertainParameters_ShouldDoSomething()
    {
        _matchService
               .Expect(x => x.GetMatches(Arg<string>.Is.Anything))
               .Return(new []{new Match()});

        _sut.DoSomething();

        _matchService.AssertWasCalled(x => x.GetMatches(Arg<string>.Is.Anything);
    }
2
  • Package RhinoMocks 3.6.1 is not compatible with netcoreapp1.0 (.NETCoreApp,Version=v1.0). Package RhinoMocks 3.6.1 supports: net (.NETFramework,Version=v0.0)
    – ganjan
    Jun 9 '16 at 11:56
  • Other frameworks are slowly taking this set. Jun 9 '16 at 11:58
0

I worked over @madjack and @Kritner's answers and made my

Basic Inheritable Base Test Class for Dependency Injection

Just register your services inside of it and inherite.

public class BaseTester 
{
    protected IProductService _productService; 
    protected IEmployeeService _employeeService; 

    public BaseTester()
    {
        var services = new ServiceCollection();

        services.AddTransient<IProductService, ProductService>();
        services.AddTransient<IEmployeeService, EmployeeService>();

        var serviceProvider = services.BuildServiceProvider();

        _productService = serviceProvider.GetService<IProductService>();
        _employeeService = serviceProvider.GetService<IEmployeeService>();
    }
}
0
Improved solution

I improved madjack's solution by wrapping it in single abstract class and adding four methods (including two async equivalents) with callbacks as parameters. GetRequiredScopedService<TSvc>() is using private static property services for caching now, so derived classes don't create new instances over and over. Another optimization is making host static, so we don't build it every time in derived classes. I also removed pointless try/catch:

    public abstract class TestWithDependencyInjection
    {
        private static readonly IHost host =
            Program.CreateHostBuilder(Constants.CommandArgs).Build();
        private static readonly IList<object> services =
            new List<object>();

        private IServiceScope svcScope;

        protected async Task<TResult> UseSvcAsync<TSvc, TResult>(
            Func<TSvc, Task<TResult>> callback, 
            bool shouldBeDisposed = true)
        {
            var scopedSvc = GetRequiredScopedService<TSvc>();
            TResult result = await callback(scopedSvc);
            if(shouldBeDisposed) 
                svcScope.Dispose();
            return result;
        }

        protected async Task UseSvcAsync<TSvc>(
            Func<TSvc, Task> callback)
        {
            var scopedSvc = GetRequiredScopedService<TSvc>();
            await callback(scopedSvc);
            svcScope.Dispose();
        }

        protected TResult UseSvc<TSvc, TResult>(
            Func<TSvc, TResult> callback, bool shouldBeDisposed = true)
        {
            var scopedSvc = GetRequiredScopedService<TSvc>();
            TResult result = callback(scopedSvc);
            if(shouldBeDisposed)
                svcScope.Dispose();
            return result;
        }

        protected void UseSvc<TSvc>(Action<TSvc> callback)
        {
            var scopedSvc = GetRequiredScopedService<TSvc>();
            callback(scopedSvc);
            svcScope.Dispose();
        }

        private TSvc GetRequiredScopedService<TSvc>()
        {
            var requiredScopedSvc = (TSvc)services.SingleOrDefault(
                svc => svc is TSvc);
            if (requiredScopedSvc != null)
                return requiredScopedSvc;
            svcScope = host.Services.CreateScope();
            requiredScopedSvc = svcScope.ServiceProvider
                .GetRequiredService<TSvc>();
            services.Add(requiredScopedSvc);
            return requiredScopedSvc;
        }
    }
Example of returning async result from used injected service:
            int foobarsCount = await UseSvcAsync<IFoobarSvc, int>(
                    foobarSvc => foobarSvc.GetCountAsync());
Additional information

I added optional shouldBeDisposed argument set on true to methods returning TResult and Task<TResult> in case, when you want to use same instance of service outside of callback's body:

            IFoobarSvc foobarSvc = UseSvc<IFoobarSvc, IFoobarSvc>(
                    foobarSvc => foobarSvc, false);

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