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This question really applies to any website or enterprise system where a single user can be assigned multiple roles.

In ASP.NET Identity you have IdentityUser and IdentityRole, where a user can have 0 or more roles. Controller actions are then protected by [Authorize(Roles = "roleName")]

Given a simple conceptual system that has these 3 simple roles:

Administrator
Manager
User

...a simple admin-type user who should have access to all controller actions:

JoeAdmin

And the following sample Web API controller:

public IHttpActionResult GetForUsersAndAbove()
{
    //
}

public IHttpActionResult GetForAdminsOnly()
{
    //
}

Should the system be designed such that:

  1. JoeAdmin be assigned just one role--Administrator, or
  2. JoeAdmin be assigned to Administrator, Manager and User?

My motivation for asking this is when it comes to authorizing controller actions. If JoeAdmin is only assigned the Administrator role, then based on the following authorization attributes he would not be able to access GetForUsersAndAbove() because he is not a member of the User role

[Authorize(Roles = "User")]
public IHttpActionResult GetForUsersAndAbove()
...

[Authorize(Roles = "Administrator")]
public IHttpActionResult GetForAdminsOnly()
...

So then the question is, should GetForUsersAndAbove() be decorated with

[Authorize(Roles = "User, Manager, Administrator")]

so that he can access it? OR

Should should the system assign JoeAdmin essentially all of the roles so that he can access all controller methods, even if they are marked with [Authorize(Roles = "User")]?

EDIT

If I use the following convention for controller actions

[Authorize(Roles = "User")]
public IHttpActionResult GetForUsers()

And expect that if JoeAdmin should access this method he should also be a member of the User role, this leads to a UI concern on an imaginary User Management screen:

Here's a scenario: you're a new user to the system, given the responsibility of managing users. You add a new user JaneAdmin with the intent that she has full/unrestricted access to the system. You are presented with 3 checkboxes: Administrator, Manager and User. Without documentation to guide you, which checkbox(s) do you tick? If I put myself in that user's shoes, I would intuitively just tick "Administrator", expecting that it will provide full access. I can also imagine the frustration when JaneAdmin finds that she is locked out of simple user-level operations. So the UI required that all 3 checkboxes should be ticked... that satisfies the authorization aspect of the system, but makes for a poor user experience.

So how does one typically deal with this problem?

1

You yourself answer your own question, really. It is easier to have multiple roles for users rather than specify all possible roles on controller because roles are stored in your database and can be manipulated any time, but adding a role to a controller requires rebuild and redeploy of your project.

Also not all administrators should have access to all the areas. I've seen systems where administrators were allowed to create users and modify password, but not allowed to see personal medical records.

So yes, I'd very much recommend assigning multiple roles to your users - it'll be easier to maintain this in the longer run.

Edit: So you want super-admin user that can access anywhere without having to specifically mention that in all the controllers? Sounds like you need to override AuthorizeAttirbute to add Admin role to be always authorized.

Something like this:

public class MyAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        var authorized = base.AuthorizeCore(httpContext);
        if (!authorized)
        {
            // The user is not authorized => no need to go any further
            return false;
        }


        if(httpContext.User.IsInRole("Admin"))
        {
            return true;
        }

        return base.AuthorizeCore(httpContext);
    }
}

And then decorate all your controllers with this new attribute:

[MyAuthorize(Roles = "User")]
public ActionResult MySuperAction()
{
    ...
}
  • Thanks. Your 2nd point makes a lot of sense. As per your recommendation, please see my EDIT in the question. – BCA Jun 10 '16 at 15:21
  • It never occurred to me that that was possible--thanks – BCA Jun 11 '16 at 0:49

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