4

If I have two protocols whose associated type happens to be the same, such as

protocol Read {
    associatedtype Element
    func read() -> Element
}
protocol Write {
    associatedtype Element
    func write(a: Element)
}

Then I would like to have a class to read integer from and write string to:

class ReadWrite: Read, Write {
    func read() -> Int {
        return 5
    }
    func write(a: String) {
        print("writing \(a)")
    }
}

but the compiler complains and suggests changing String to Int. Ideally the type should be inferred, or at least compiles if I explicitly declare

associatedtype Read.Element = Int
associatedtype Write.Element = String

within ReadWrite. Any work around?

update

Workaround inspired by this question is to create two auxiliary protocols

protocol ReadInt: Read {
    associatedtype Element = Int
}
protocol WriteString: Write {
    associatedtype Element = String
}

and have the class inherit from these two instead:

class ReadWrite: ReadInt, WriteString {
    func read() -> Int {
        return 5
    }
    func write(a: String) {
        print("writing \(a)")
    }
}

This seems to compile, but I am afraid of any gotcha following this way.

update again

I found the issue in Swift's issue tracker. Anyone require this missing feature (like me) should vote for it.

  • Do you own the Read and Write protocols? If so, you could simply change the name of the associatedtypes to something like ReadElement and WriteElement. – Mike Taverne Jun 9 '16 at 23:18
  • @MikeTaverne true, but I feel stressed when I am writing libraries, where I need to manually prefix the name of my associated type (like FYMyLibElement. This issue is not that rare, e.g. in the Foundation package there are many protocols sharing the same associated type name "Element". – Franklin Yu Jun 10 '16 at 2:41
  • Is it possible to implement two such Foundation protocols in the same class where a different type is used in the implementation of each protocol? – Mike Taverne Jun 10 '16 at 5:09
  • 1
    Hmm... Not yet. Should I file it here? Oh, there is already an issue. – Franklin Yu Jun 16 '16 at 4:00
  • 1
    @MikeTaverne I voted for the issue; that's all I can do by far, I guess. – Franklin Yu Jun 16 '16 at 4:07
1

Another workaround is to create a third, combined protocol:

protocol ReadWrite {
    associatedtype R
    associatedtype W
    func read() -> R
    func write(a: W)
}

It's not pretty, since it forces you to redeclare the protocol members, but it does keep it generic (you're not limited to String and Int).

  • This solution reminds me of this question; I tend to regard this as a bug of the compiler. – Franklin Yu Jun 10 '16 at 20:57
  • This solution has one drawback: if more than two protocols share the same associated type name, I need to have a combined protocol for every possible combination among them, so I would leave the choice to the user. – Franklin Yu Jun 10 '16 at 21:26
  • It seems the compiler cannot distinguish between associatedtypes defined in different protocols with the same name. The scope of the associatedtype name is made to extend beyond the protocol in which it was defined. – Mike Taverne Jun 10 '16 at 23:55
  • I thought that under the hood Element is renamed to Read.Element or Write.Element. It seems that currently the compiler is polluting the current namespace with all the associated type from the adopted protocols (and their parent-protocols), is it? Or this is just how the language is specified? – Franklin Yu Jun 11 '16 at 19:19
  • It's not really a workaround: suppose, there are two APIs one requiring a parameter conforming to Read another one with a parameter conforming to Write. There's no way to have one concrete struct or class which conforms to both. "No way" means, it's impossible to express this in Swift. Bummer. – CouchDeveloper Jun 16 '16 at 7:21

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