8

I'm trying to see if this is possible in the C++14 generic lambda, but I cannot find a right way to express it (or perhaps it is not possible). The simplified example is:

auto confirmOperation = [](auto pr){
  assert(pr.second);
};

The idea is that if you pass it an std::pair where the second is a bool (such as what is returned from emplace functions), it can look at this bool.

If this was a template parameter instead, I could explicitly show the pair with the types of the pair as generic, but I don't think that is possible with a lambda? Thus instead I mark the entire argument as generic, and thus the compiler doesn't seem able to deduce that I'm passing it the return of a map's emplace().

Any way to do this?

  • 4
    Can you please show the surrounding code (i.e. with the map emplace included)? – Smeeheey Jun 10 '16 at 13:15
  • 4
    What are you asking for here? auto is a generic type that can represent pair.Do you want to change the behavior of the function by the types in the return? – Jonathan Mee Jun 10 '16 at 13:17
  • 3
    So, many people upvoted and favorited this. If you can read the above and explain what you think the OP is saying, could you translate for me? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Jun 10 '16 at 15:52
  • There is nothing wrong with the code you have posted. In what way does it fail to satisfy what you need? – Oktalist Jun 10 '16 at 17:41
14

You can constrain a lambda using enable_if:

auto confirmOperation = [](auto pr) ->
    std::enable_if_t<std::is_same<decltype(pr.second), bool>::value> {
  assert(pr.second);
};

Example.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Wow, that is some kung fu. – johnbakers Jun 10 '16 at 13:54
  • @ecatmur Yeah that.s why I used decltype(pr.second) in mine too ;) – Jonathan Mee Jun 10 '16 at 15:01
  • 3
    While neat, how is this an answer to the OP's "question"? In short, why do you think this is what the OP is asking? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Jun 10 '16 at 15:27
  • @Yakk If you have some clarification on what the OP wants please enlighten us (my comment doesn't seem to be getting the job done.) Otherwise this is as good an answer as any. It's also been given the OP's seal of kung fu so that's gotta count for something. – Jonathan Mee Jun 10 '16 at 15:38
1

You could define an implementation details template function:

template<typename T>
void lambda_impl(std::pair<T, bool> const &p) {
  assert(p.second);
}

and then call this in your lambda as:

auto f = [](auto p) { lambda_impl(p); };

The following scheme may be available in the future with the advent of Concepts-Lite. For the time being it works only on GCC:

auto f = [](std::pair<auto, auto> const &p) { assert(p.second); };

or even better:

auto f = [](std::pair<auto, bool> const &p) { assert(p.second); };

P.S Clang is correct not to compile this due to the fact that auto parameters are not part of C++14.

| improve this answer | |
  • This doesn't compile on clang with c++14 enabled – Smeeheey Jun 10 '16 at 13:12
  • 1
    very pretty, but my Clang with -std=c++14 won't compile this. it says: 'auto' not allowed in template argument and it underlines the first auto in the pair you have there – johnbakers Jun 10 '16 at 13:12
  • That's sad, because it compiles on coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/288f843d3219dc07. Is that standard or a GCC extension? – KABoissonneault Jun 10 '16 at 13:14
  • 1
    Fails on MSVS2015 as well(I know not a really good tool to check for compliance). – NathanOliver Jun 10 '16 at 13:17
  • 2
    From cppreference: "If auto is used as a type of a parameter, the lambda is a generic lambda. ". Since auto is not the type of a parameter, then it can't be a generic lambda. I think it's a neat feature, though. – KABoissonneault Jun 10 '16 at 13:19
1

Seems like you could just use is_same and static_assert here:

[](auto pr){
    static_assert(is_same_v<decltype(pr.second), bool>);
    assert(pr.second);
};

Or if C++17 is not an option, a message to static_assert is required and you won't be able to use is_same_v:

[](auto pr){
    static_assert(is_same<decltype(pr.second), bool>::value, "ouch");
    assert(pr.second);
}

Live Example

| improve this answer | |
  • Isn't static_assert without a message C++17 only? And what happens if pr.second is not a valid expression? – KABoissonneault Jun 10 '16 at 13:30
  • 1
    @KABoissonneault You're right. I've written a live example using only C++14. If pr.second is invalid then the static_assert will trigger. Which it seems like is what we wanted in the first place? – Jonathan Mee Jun 10 '16 at 13:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.