-3

If I want to pass to a constructor a Comparator that can compare on two different types, should the parameter of the constructor be like this?:

public MyClass(Comparator<?> comp) {
  this.comp = comp;
}

Then my comparator class:

public NameComparator implements Comparator<String> {

  @Override
    public int compare(String s1, String s2) {
        return s1.compareTo(s2);
    }
}

Then whenever I instantiate the class I do:

MyClass myClass = new MyClass(new NameComparator());

Is this the correct way to go about doing this?

Thanks

EDIT:

Here's the relevant code:

public class BST<T> {
  /* binary search tree */
  ...
  private Comparator<T> c;

  /* pass in comparator to constructor*/
  public BST(Comparator<T> c) {
    this.c = c;
  }

Comparator:

public class NameComparator implements Comparator<String> {
 @Override
 public int compare(String s1, String s2) {
   return s2.compareTo(s1);
 }
}

When I am creating BST:

BST bst = new BST(new NameComparator());
  • 1
    You shouldn't be able to invoke the compare method on this.comp, because of its wildcard type. – Andy Turner Jun 10 '16 at 21:35
  • I'm gonna add more later, but that's not the point of this question. I really wanted to know how to take care of generic types of the constructor – Kingamere Jun 10 '16 at 21:35
  • 4
    You could make the class itself generic: MyClass<T> and then only let the constructor accept comparators of the same type (public MyClass(Comparator<T> comp)). – Mick Mnemonic Jun 10 '16 at 21:37
  • 2
    @Kingamere you would need a type variable declared on the class (e.g. MyClass<T>), which you use in the field and parameter type declarations (e.g. Comparator<T> or, if you want to be a bit more generic, Comparator<? super T>). – Andy Turner Jun 10 '16 at 21:42
  • 1
    "Then how does Java's TreeMap class accept any type of comparator?" - It doesn't. It accepts any comparator of a specific type (depending on <T>). Not a comparator that could be one of two different specific types. Java does not support the kind of typing that you want. – Stephen C Jun 11 '16 at 0:04
0

Your requirements seem a bit special and you cannot make use of generic types, because String is a final class, which your "special class" cannot extend.

You could perhaps make this work by using a marker interface, which both of your Comparator classes need to implement:

/** Marker interface for special comparators */
public interface SpecialComparator{}

public class NameComparator implements Comparator<String>, SpecialComparator{
    @Override
    public int compare(String s1, String s2) {
      return s2.compareTo(s1);
    }
}

public class BST {
    /* binary search tree */
    ...
    private SpecialComparator c;

    /* pass in comparator to constructor*/
    public BST(SpecialComparator c) {
      this.c = c;
    }
}
  • 1
    What is this actually accomplishing, then? – Louis Wasserman Jun 10 '16 at 22:18
  • @LouisWasserman, type safety, which is what marker interfaces accomplish, in general (see also Effective Java, Item 37). If you come up with a better suggestion given the constraints, feel free to share your answer. – Mick Mnemonic Jun 10 '16 at 22:21
  • Fine, would it be easier to have the constructor accept one Comparator of ANY type, instead of just restricting it to String and my "special type" ? – Kingamere Jun 10 '16 at 22:23
  • No, if your code is only designed to work with these two types of comparators. – Mick Mnemonic Jun 10 '16 at 22:25
  • @MickMnemonic, eh? Yes, it's easier not to restrict which types you accept; then you don't have to resort to marker interfaces and the code the OP already has in the original question is correct. – Louis Wasserman Jun 10 '16 at 22:26

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