1

I have two tables:

orders

| id | item_id | quantity | ordered_on |
|----|---------|----------|------------|
|  1 |    1    |    2     | 2016-03-09 |
|  2 |    1    |    2     | 2016-03-12 |
|  3 |    4    |    3     | 2016-03-15 |
|  4 |    4    |    3     | 2016-03-13 |

stocks

| id | item_id | quantity | enter_on   | expire_on  |
|----|---------|----------|------------|------------|
|  1 |    1    |   10     | 2016-03-07 | 2016-03-10 |
|  2 |    1    |   20     | 2016-03-11 | 2016-03-15 |
|  3 |    1    |   20     | 2016-03-14 | 2016-03-17 |
|  4 |    4    |   10     | 2016-03-14 |    NULL    |
|  5 |    4    |   10     | 2016-03-12 |    NULL    |

I'm trying to create a view to show the orders along with their closest stocks enter_on like this (I'm using include_after and include_before to give an overview on which date I want to exclude the item that's preordered, so the stock would reflect correctly.)

include_after is always going to be the stock that came in but not expired yet, if expired, show NULL, include_before will always show the next incoming stock enter_on, unless there's an expire_on that's earlier than the next enter_on.

| item_id | quantity | ordered_on | include_after | include_before |
|---------|----------|------------|---------------|----------------|
|    1    |    2     | 2016-03-09 |  2016-03-07   |   2016-03-10   |
|    1    |    2     | 2016-03-12 |  2016-03-11   |   2016-03-14   |
|    4    |    3     | 2016-03-13 |  2016-03-12   |   2016-03-14   |
|    4    |    3     | 2016-03-15 |  2016-03-14   |      NULL      |

So this is what I came up with:

SELECT
  o.item_id, o.quantity, o.order_on, (
    SELECT COALESCE(MAX(s.enter_on), NULL::DATE)
    FROM stocks s
    WHERE s.enter_on <= o.order_on AND s.item_id = o.item_id
  ) as include_after, (
    SELECT COALESCE(MIN(s.enter_on), NULL::DATE)
    FROM stocks s
    WHERE s.enter_on > o.order_on AND s.item_id = o.item_id
  ) as include_before
FROM
  orders o;

It works fine (I haven't included the expire_on part), but I'm worrying about performance issue for using two subqueries in the select.

Does anyone have some alternative suggestions?

UPDATE

I'm using Postgresql 9.4 (Can't add anymore tags)

the actual problem is way more complicated than I stated, it's a lot of tables joined together and views, I shrunk it down to just one table to grasp the concept if there are alternatives

  • Actual table definitions would be much more useful. Ideally, complete CREATE TABLE statements showing data types and constraints. And, obviously, your version of Postgres. – Erwin Brandstetter Jun 12 '16 at 2:24
  • So do you have your answer? – Erwin Brandstetter Mar 12 '17 at 21:56
1

You should worry about performance when the situation arises. For the example that you provided, an index on stocks(item_id, enter_on, expire_on) should be sufficient. Then you might actually want two indexes: stocks(item_id, enter_on desc, expire_on).

If the performance is not sufficient, you have two choices. One is a GIST index for ranges. (Here is an interesting discussion of the issue.) The second is an alternative query formulation.

However, I would attempt to optimize the query until there is enough data to show a performance problem. Solutions on smaller amounts of data just might not scale well.

1

Discussing the query you display, also not considering expire_on.

COALESCE for a correlated subquery

First off, the expression COALESCE(anything, NULL) never makes sense. You would replace NULL with NULL.

Aggregate function like max() return NULL anyway (and never "no row"), even if no qualifying row is found. (The exception being count(), which returns 0).

And a correlated subquery that would return "no row" (like the variant with ORDER BY ... LIMIT 1 i am going to demonstrate below) defaults to NULL for the column value.

So, if you wanted to use COALESCE in this context, you would wrap it around the correlated subquery as a whole - and make it return something else than NULL for NULL.

Query

I'm worrying about performance issue for using two subqueries in the select.

It depends.

If you only few rows per item_id in table stocks and / or only an index ON stocks (item_id), then it would make sense to merge the two correlated subqueries into one LATERAL subquery with conditional aggregates:

SELECT o.item_id, o.quantity, o.order_on
     , s.include_after, s.include_before
FROM  orders o
    , LATERAL (
   SELECT max(enter_on) FILTER (WHERE enter_on <= o.order_on) AS include_after
        , min(enter_on) FILTER (WHERE enter_on >  o.order_on) AS include_before
   FROM   stocks
   WHERE  item_id = o.item_id
   ) s;

Since the LATERAL subquery returns a row in any case (see above), a simple CROSS JOIN is fine. Else you might want to use LEFT JOIN LATERAL (...) ON true. Details:

The aggregate FILTER clause requires Postgres 9.4+. There are alternatives for older versions:

If, on the other hand, you have many rows per item_id in table stocks and an index ON stocks (item_id, enter_on), your query might still be faster. Or this slightly adapted version (test both!):

SELECT o.item_id, o.quantity, o.order_on
   , (SELECT s.enter_on
      FROM   stocks s
      WHERE  s.item_id = o.item_id
      AND    s.enter_on <= o.order_on
      ORDER  BY 1 DESC NULLS LAST
      LIMIT  1) AS include_after
   , (SELECT s.enter_on
      FROM   stocks s
      WHERE  s.item_id = o.item_id
      AND    s.enter_on > o.order_on
      ORDER  BY 1
      LIMIT  1) AS include_before
FROM  orders o;

Because both correlated subqueries can be resolved to a single index lookup each.

To optimize performance, you might need a 2nd index ON stocks (item_id, enter_on DESC NULLS LAST). But I would not create too many specialized indexes unless you actually need to squeeze out more read performance for this query (key word: premature optimization).

Detailed discussion in this related answer:

  • thanks for the suggestions, the actual problem is way more complicated than I stated, it's a lot of tables joined together and views, I shrunk it down to just one table to grasp the concept if there are alternatives, looks like I have a lot of readings to do. – lusketeer Jun 12 '16 at 15:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.