2

I have been trying implement product of Array Except Self. My initial thought was to use indexes === array[j] and continue, but it is not working. Can anyone explain why?

 var array = [1,2,3,4];
    function productOfArrayExceptSelf(array){
     var result = 0;
     var resultArray = []; 
     var indexes;
    for(var i = 0; i < array.length; i++){
      for(var j = 0; j < array.length; j++){
         indexes = array[j];
         if(indexes === array[j]){
            continue;
         }
      }
    }
    return result;
    }
3
  • 3
    What does this mean indexes = array[j]; if(indexes === array[j]) ? Jun 11 '16 at 22:07
  • 1
    Spell out what you are trying to do.
    – PM 77-1
    Jun 11 '16 at 22:07
  • 1
    implement product of Array Except Self: there is no product in your code.
    – trincot
    Jun 11 '16 at 22:25
9

You can use the following solution (without using a division operator):

function Product(arr){

    var temp = [];


    var product = 1;
    for(var i=0; i<arr.length; i++){
        temp[i] = product;
        product *= arr[i];
    }

    product = 1;
    for(var i=arr.length-1; i>=0; i--){
        temp[i] *= product;
        product *= arr[i];
    }

    return temp;
}
1
  • Indeed, a nice solution.
    – trincot
    May 30 '17 at 19:33
8

You need to compare i with j to know when to continue. Also, you have nowhere a multiplication happening.

Here is a working snippet:

function productOfArrayExceptSelf(array){
    var resultArray = [], product;
    for(var i = 0; i < array.length; i++){
      product = 1;
      for(var j = 0; j < array.length; j++){
         if(i !== j) product *= array[j];
      }
      resultArray.push(product);
    }
    return resultArray;
}

// Sample data
var array = [1,2,3,4];
console.log(productOfArrayExceptSelf(array));

Here is a more compact version, making use of map and reduce:

function productOfArrayExceptSelf(array){
    return array.map(function (_, i) {
        return array.reduce(function (product, val, j) {
            return product * (i === j ? 1 : val);
        }, 1);
    });
}

var array = [1,2,3,4];
console.log(productOfArrayExceptSelf(array));

... and here is an ES6 version that runs in O(n) instead of O(n²). The idea is to take the product of all numbers and divide it by the one at the relevant index. Of course, some precautions are needed for when there is a zero in the array:

function productOfArrayExceptSelf(array){
    const [product, zeroAt] = array.reduce(([product, zeroAt], val, j) =>
        val ? [product * val, zeroAt] 
            : zeroAt >= 0 ? [0, -1] // there is more than one zero
            : [product, j] // there is a zero at index j
    , [1, -2]);
    return zeroAt == -1 ? array.fill(0) // there is more than one zero
        : zeroAt >= 0 ? Object.assign(array.fill(0), { [zeroAt]: product })
        : array.map((val, i) => product / val);
}

console.log(productOfArrayExceptSelf([1,2,3,4]));
console.log(productOfArrayExceptSelf([1,0,3,4]));
console.log(productOfArrayExceptSelf([1,0,0,4]));
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

6
  • But this solution would be O(N^2). Can we achieve this in O(N) with map and reduce? May 26 '17 at 3:59
  • @TechnoCorner, I added a O(n) version to my answer.
    – trincot
    May 26 '17 at 7:14
  • Hey @trincot thanks for the solution but can we do it without division operator? (This was the actual question which OP forgot to mention). It's about finding product of all numbers except itself (without using any division) May 30 '17 at 3:16
  • Are you the OP?
    – trincot
    May 30 '17 at 4:57
  • No. I am not. But should I be an OP to ask questions? I was preparing for this question as well so I felt like Instead of spamming another thread, I could ask here. I found a solution without using division operator. I will write the answer here. May 30 '17 at 19:23
3

Here is O(n) solution of the product of array except self. The soluton is verbose but easy to understand.

var test = [2, 3, 5, 6];

console.log(productExceptSelf(test));

function productExceptSelf(nums) {
    // We will need two arrays
    // One front and one from back
    var front = []; var back = [];
    
    // Set the first element of first to 1
    front[0] = 1; 
    
    // Set the last element of back to 1
    back[nums.length - 1] = 1;
    
    // Now multiply
    for(var i = 1; i < nums.length; i++) {
        front[i] = nums[i-1]*front[i-1];
    }
    
    for(var i = nums.length - 2; i >= 0; i--) {
        back[i] = nums[i+1]*back[i+1];
    }
    
    // Multiply front and back and put it in nums/ result
    for(var i = 0; i< front.length; i++) {
        nums[i] = front[i]*back[i];
    }
    

    // Return nums
    return nums;
};

How does this work? Let's look at an example:

arr   =  [1,  2,  3, 4]
front =  [1,  1,  2, 6]
back  =  [24, 12, 4, 1]
-----------------------
ans   =  [24, 12, 8, 6]   
0

Here is my solution in javascript. The approach I took was to iterate through the given array (values) using javascript array method forEach,in the arrow function passed to the forEach method,I used the array method splice to remove the current element at that index then used the array method reduce to get the product of all the elements in the array ie minus the current element since it has been removed earlier, then push the result into the output array and then using unshift to add the deleted element at that index, so that on the next iteration the initial array values would be complete.

let values = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
let output = [];
values.forEach((element, index, array) => {
     let removed_element = values.splice(index, 1)
     output.push(values.reduce((a, b) => a * b));
     values.unshift(removed_element);
});

console.log(output);
1
  • 1
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion.
    – Alessio
    Sep 28 '19 at 20:57
0
enter code here

function ProductArray(array) {
  let result = []
  if(array.length === 1) return [array[0]];
  for (let i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    let product = 1;
    for (let j = 0; j < array.length; j++) {
      product = (product * array[j]);
      actual = product/array[i];
    } 
    result.push(actual);
  }
  return result
}
    
console.log(ProductArray([1, 2, 3, 4]));//[24, 12, 8, 6]

2
  • 1
    Please try to be complete with your answer and explain your answer.
    – Thakkie
    Dec 8 '20 at 8:27
  • add desribtion to your answer
    – Abilogos
    Dec 8 '20 at 9:07
0
  function multiplyElements(array){
      return array.reduce((acc,curr)=> acc*curr );
    };
    
    let nA = [];
    
    function multiplyArray(ar){
      let temp='';
      for(let i=0;i<ar.length;i++){
        temp = ar.splice(i,1);
        nA.push(multiplyElements(ar));
        ar.unshift(temp[0])
      }
      return nA;
    }
    
    
    console.log(multiplyArray([1,2,3,4]));
1
  • Please add further details to expand on your answer, such as working code or documentation citations.
    – Community Bot
    Aug 31 at 11:40

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