2

Possible to sort an array in a worst case run time O(n) if the array only contains k ∈ ℕ>0 (k is a constant) different elements?

The assumption is that it requires constant time to compare an array that has n elements in it.

First of all I'd like to understand the task, what they want? I understand the assumption. But what's exactly meant by k ∈ ℕ>0 (k is a constant) different elements?

Does that mean we got an array and the size of it is k and because it says ℕ>0 the array size cannot be 0? Is that correct? If so I don't quite understand why they don't just say array with n elements instead of it.

Anyway, that's how I understood it and I would say it's NOT possible to sort this array in worst case run time O(n) because if we take a look at bucket sort / radix sort etc. it could be done in O(n*logn).

  • Possible to sort an array in a worst case run time O(n) At worst you need to compare each item in the list with log(n) of them – Ed Heal Jun 12 '16 at 11:12
  • But assumption says the compare is done in constant time, so O(n) and not O(log n) – itaminul Jun 12 '16 at 11:15
  • Is this what you mean? en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counting_sort – Jerry Jeremiah Jun 12 '16 at 11:34
  • See this question and the answers provided. – Joseph Wood Jun 12 '16 at 11:48
  • The problem statement seems poorly expressed. Assuming normal set notation, then k ∈ ℕ>0 means that k is an element of the set of natural (counting) numbers 1 to ∞. Nothing is stated about the type of elements in the array, only that there are only k different elements. – rcgldr Jun 12 '16 at 16:03
5

If you know the values, you can sort array by putting numbers into "buckets". For each value, you create bucket and you add number to that bucket when you iterate through it. You this with all the numbers and only once, therefore it is done in O(n)


For example having only numbers from 0-9, you can sort it as following

public class SortInBucket {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] x = {0,5,1,1,1,1,7,9,3,2,1,2,5,6};
        System.out.println("Result of sorting: " + Arrays.toString(sortInBuckets(x)));
    }

    public static int[] sortInBuckets(int[] arr) {
        List<List<Integer>> sortedNumbers = new ArrayList<>();
        int[] sortedArr = new int[arr.length];
        // create buckets 0 - 9
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            sortedNumbers.add(new ArrayList<>());
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
            System.out.println("Found number " + arr[i] + " puting index " + i + " to bucket " + arr[i]);
            sortedNumbers.get(arr[i]).add(i);
            System.out.println("Bucket " + arr[i] + " is having " +sortedNumbers.get(arr[i]).size() + " numbers now." );
        }

        System.out.println();
        System.out.println("The sortedNumbers (list with buckets) looks like following: " +sortedNumbers );

        //just going through buckets and adding its numbers to sortedArr
        int sortedIndex = 0;
        for (List<Integer> bucket : sortedNumbers){
            for (Integer num : bucket){
                sortedArr[sortedIndex] = arr[num];
                sortedIndex++;
            }
        }

        return sortedArr;
    }
}

The code above have this output

Found number 0 puting index 0 to bucket 0
Bucket 0 is having 1 numbers now.
Found number 5 puting index 1 to bucket 5
Bucket 5 is having 1 numbers now.
Found number 1 puting index 2 to bucket 1
Bucket 1 is having 1 numbers now.
Found number 1 puting index 3 to bucket 1
Bucket 1 is having 2 numbers now.
Found number 1 puting index 4 to bucket 1
Bucket 1 is having 3 numbers now.
Found number 1 puting index 5 to bucket 1
Bucket 1 is having 4 numbers now.
Found number 7 puting index 6 to bucket 7
Bucket 7 is having 1 numbers now.
Found number 9 puting index 7 to bucket 9
Bucket 9 is having 1 numbers now.
Found number 3 puting index 8 to bucket 3
Bucket 3 is having 1 numbers now.
Found number 2 puting index 9 to bucket 2
Bucket 2 is having 1 numbers now.
Found number 1 puting index 10 to bucket 1
Bucket 1 is having 5 numbers now.
Found number 2 puting index 11 to bucket 2
Bucket 2 is having 2 numbers now.
Found number 5 puting index 12 to bucket 5
Bucket 5 is having 2 numbers now.
Found number 6 puting index 13 to bucket 6
Bucket 6 is having 1 numbers now.

The sortedNumbers (list with buckets) looks like following: [[0], [2, 3, 4, 5, 10], [9, 11], [8], [], [1, 12], [13], [6], [], [7]]
Result of sorting: [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 5, 5, 6, 7, 9]

As was mentioned by J.F. Sebastian and Steve314, alghoritms that do this are called Radix sort (more generalized alghorithm) or Counting sort (not as "strong", but more simple and can be used for this example).

  • I would like to see this algorithm for sorting N numbers. – Ed Heal Jun 12 '16 at 11:15
  • @EdHeal foreach x (array) { bucket[x]++; } foreach x (indices(bucket)) { foreach i (range(bucket[x])) { output(x); } } – melpomene Jun 12 '16 at 11:19
  • Is it correct that x is the same size as n for this problem? – Ed Heal Jun 12 '16 at 11:22
  • 1
    When you generalize this, you end up with radix sorting - multiple passes, bucketing up items according to a particular digit position, doing the most-significant digit first. "Digit" need not mean 0..9 - it could mean e.g. byte. Typically the (maximum) number of digits for any number is fixed, so the number of passes is fixed, so you can call it O(n), though if you support big integers it's O(kn) where k is how many digits/passes (or worse if you can't extract a specific digit from a number in O(1) time). – Steve314 Jun 12 '16 at 11:23
  • 1
    @Steve314 - radix sort is normally implemented least significant digit first, since it allows the buckets to be concatenated after each pass. In the case of a counting / radix sort, an array or matrix of counts converted into indices allows a temp array of the same size as the original array to be used. – rcgldr Jun 12 '16 at 15:56
1

No, the array has size n, but it can contain duplicate elements. There are only k unique elements in the array. (Or in other words, n - k is the number of duplicates in the array.)

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