21

I'd previously used TDM-GCC-5.10 and now switched back to 4.9 MINGW-GCC and getting a weird error with trying to use list-initialization:

class Vector2
{
public:
    Vector2(float x, float y)
    {
        this->x = x;
        this->y = y;
    }
    float x = 0.f;
    float y = 0.f;
};

struct Test
{
    int x = 0;
    Vector2 v;
};

int main()
{    
    Test tst = {0,Vector2(0.0f,0.0f)}; //Error
    return 0;
}

Error:

main.cpp: In function 'int main()':
main.cpp:21:41: error: could not convert '{0, Vector2(0.0f, 0.0f)}' from '<brace-enclosed initializer list>' to 'Test'
         Test tst = {0,Vector2(0.0f,0.0f)}; //Error
                                         ^

I used C++14 with both compilers. What is wrong?

9
  • There is no main in the question. See How to Ask and provide a minimal reproducible example. Jun 12 '16 at 17:03
  • @Olaf Edited, just copy and try to run it. Jun 12 '16 at 17:06
  • Rolled back to previous version. You are not supposed to edit a question once you have an answer if that edit removes the context for that answer. You might append an explanation, though if that is clearly marked as such. Jun 12 '16 at 17:21
  • 2
    But the Answer is pointless because it has nothing to do with the Question. Jun 12 '16 at 17:23
  • 1
    @Olaf: I disagree. By that logic any question with a typo should keep it if someone answered that there is a typo.
    – Dani
    Jun 12 '16 at 17:24
35

The problem is here:

struct Test
{
    int x = 0; // <==
    Vector2 v;
};

Until recently, default member initializer prevent the class from being an aggregate, so you cannot use aggregate initialization on them. Gcc 4.9 still implements the old rules here, whereas gcc 5 uses the new ones.

9
  • 1
    Unbelievable, this even influences forward compatibility. They should never have done this change! Also a problem that this works perfectly with VC2017!
    – DrumM
    Feb 28 '19 at 13:54
  • @DrumM I don't understand the comment - what influences compatibility? What change should never have been done?
    – Barry
    Feb 28 '19 at 15:33
  • Like you said, when the class is not an aggregate anymore, the default constructor is not generated. Maybe it's wrong to say "it's not forward compatible" because we are using a new feature. But in my opinion, the specification is a mess, why would you still need to implement a default constructor if you specify default initialization on a member... Doesn't make sense.
    – DrumM
    Mar 4 '19 at 22:36
  • @DrumM Huh? Test here has a default constructor. What do you still need to implement?
    – Barry
    Mar 4 '19 at 22:46
  • @DrumM "Like you said, when the class is not an aggregate anymore, the default constructor is not generated" - I never said that.
    – Barry
    Mar 4 '19 at 23:05
3

You missed ; after your class definition and after int x = 0. Then you got many errors and apparently only considered the last one. But your compiler was confused because Vector2 was not defined (due to missing ;).

This compiles:

int main()
{
    class Vector2
    {
    public:
        Vector2(float x, float y)
        {
            this->x = x;
            this->y = y;
        }
        float x = 0.f;
        float y = 0.f;
    };

    struct Test
    {
        int x;
        Vector2 v;
    };

    Test tst = {0,Vector2(4,5)};
    return 0;
}
3
  • Sorry just added them, which compiler Version and standard do you use? And this is not caused by the missing ; (i forgot only in this example) everything worked fine with the TDM-GCC Compiler. Jun 12 '16 at 17:12
  • g++ 4.8.4 with option -std=c++11. Note that I also removed (accidentally) = 0 to Test's x declaration. Adding it apparently leads to a compiler error.
    – jpo38
    Jun 12 '16 at 17:23
  • Looks like i have a problem with the compiler if i remove any dialect option it compiles but with c++11/c++14 it brings me this error. Jun 12 '16 at 17:33
1
// 10.3  lowest common ancestor

// Solution: A brute-force approach is to see if the nodes are in different
// immediate subtrees of the root, or if one of the nodesis the root

#include <bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;
template <typename T>
struct Node {
  T data;

  unique_ptr<Node<T>> left;
  unique_ptr<Node<T>> right;
};

struct Status {
  int num_target_nodes;
  //   Node<int>* ancestor;
  unique_ptr<Node<int>> ancestor;
};

Status lcaHelper(unique_ptr<Node<int>>& root, unique_ptr<Node<int>>& node0,
                 unique_ptr<Node<int>>& node1) {
  if (root == nullptr) {
    return {0, nullptr};
  }

  auto l = lcaHelper(root->left, node0, node1);

  if (l.num_target_nodes == 2) return l;

  auto r = lcaHelper(root->right, node0, node1);

  if (r.num_target_nodes == 2) return r;

  int num_target_nodes = l.num_target_nodes + r.num_target_nodes +
                         (root == node0) + (root == node1);

  return {num_target_nodes, num_target_nodes == 2 ? root : nullptr};

  //   return {num_target_nodes, num_target_nodes == 2 ? root.get() :
  //   nullptr};
}

// Node<int>* lca(unique_ptr<Node<int>>& root, unique_ptr<Node<int>>& node0,
//                unique_ptr<Node<int>>& node1) {
unique_ptr<Node<int>> lca(unique_ptr<Node<int>>& root,
                          unique_ptr<Node<int>>& node0,
                          unique_ptr<Node<int>>& node1) {
  return lcaHelper(root, node0, node1).ancestor;
}

int main() {}

I tried this similar example from the book elements of programming interview. It shows the same problem and the answer above is not quite applicable to this case. I am using g++ -std=c++11 with gcc version 8.3.0 (Ubuntu 8.3.0-6ubuntu1)

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