61

Is it possible to have my ASP Core Web API ensure the DB is migrated to the latest migration using EF Core? I know this can be done through the command line, but I want to do it programatically.

Update

Based on the answer from Janshair Khan I came up with this helper class:

using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Builder;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
using MyWebApi.Models;

namespace MyWebApi
{
    public static class DataSeeder
    {
        public static void SeedData(this IApplicationBuilder app)
        {
            var context = app.ApplicationServices.GetService<MyContext>();

            if (!context.Database.EnsureCreated())
                context.Database.Migrate();
        }
    }
}

You can call this from the Configure method in your Startup.cs like this:

app.SeedData();
  • still not done it should be implemented with the next version. You can use the workaround which is posted below from Khan. – Bassam Alugili Jun 13 '16 at 10:59
  • 1
    See the answers below. You should use either EnsureCreated or Migrate. Not both. – Matt Varblow Oct 13 '17 at 13:10
  • 13
    Official documentation says : 'Don't call EnsureCreated() before Migrate(). EnsureCreated() bypasses Migrations to create the schema and cause Migrate() to fail.' : docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/managing-schemas/migrations/… – Oswin Jun 4 '18 at 16:28

11 Answers 11

36

You can use

db.Database.EnsureCreated();

to get your db up to date with your current model. If you want to enable migrations (If subsequent migrations are suspected), then use

db.Database.Migrate();

and put your subsequent migrations over time.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    EnsureCreated() is working fine But "context.Database.Migrate() " there is no Migrate() method why is that ? EF Core – Floxy Mar 7 '18 at 10:12
  • 5
    @Floxy I think you're missing using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;. – Michael Mar 12 '18 at 5:45
  • @Michael Yes!! i forgot to mention that Thank anyway !! <3 – Floxy Mar 12 '18 at 12:15
  • 1
    Where is the right place to call Database.Migrate in an ASP.NET Core app? – Shimmy Weitzhandler Jul 3 '19 at 7:01
  • @Shimmy it should be placed in the Configure method. And will look something like this context.Database.Migrate(); and you would inject the DbContext to the Configure method – Newteq Developer Jan 14 at 10:44
46

A note from documentation on the call to db.Database.EnsureCreated():

Note that this API does not use migrations to create the database. In addition, the database that is created cannot be later updated using migrations. If you are targeting a relational database and using migrations, you can use the DbContext.Database.Migrate() method to ensure the database is created and all migrations are applied.

You may just want to call db.Database.Migrate().

Comment taken from source found above declaration here.

| improve this answer | |
19

Use below code to run migration at

public async void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
{
    using (var serviceScope = app.ApplicationServices.GetRequiredService<IServiceScopeFactory>().CreateScope())
    {
        var context = serviceScope.ServiceProvider.GetService<YourContext`enter code here`>();
        context.Database.Migrate();
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    After upgrading from .NET Core 2.1 to 3.0 (and implicitly from out-of-process hosting to in-process hosting), calling Migrate from the startup stopped working for me. The web app just wouldn't boot without error message. I had mark the project as <AspNetCoreHostingModel>OutOfProcess</AspNetCoreHostingModel> and then it worked again. – Dejan Oct 29 '19 at 13:49
10

Based on the answer of @steamrolla I would propose the following improvement:

public static class EnsureMigration
{
    public static void EnsureMigrationOfContext<T>(this IApplicationBuilder app) where T:DbContext
    {
        var context = app.ApplicationServices.GetService<T>();
        context.Database.Migrate();
    }
}

With this you can also ensure the migration of different contexts, e.g. if you have a Identity database.

Usage:

app.EnsureMigrationOfContext<context>();
| improve this answer | |
5

This works for me in ASP.NET Core 3.1, simply injecting the db context as a parameter to the Configure method after registering it in the ConfigureServices method.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddDbContext<DataContext>(x => x.UseSqlite("Data Source=LocalDatabase.db"));

    ...
}
public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IWebHostEnvironment env, DataContext dataContext)
{
    dataContext.Database.Migrate();

    ...
}

More details and links to full code samples available at https://jasonwatmore.com/post/2019/12/27/aspnet-core-automatic-ef-core-migrations-to-sql-database-on-startup

| improve this answer | |
  • This works if you only have one or few contexts. But if you have many contexts there should be another way – Sven Feb 3 at 11:25
  • It works with multiple contexts as well. I use it in a project with multiple contexts that inherit from a single base context - jasonwatmore.com/post/2019/10/14/… – Jason Feb 4 at 3:10
  • I mean it's not very convenient to add multiple context parameters in the Configure() method. I followed the IStartupFilter approach to get migration automatically done on app startup. – Sven Feb 4 at 7:30
  • Only a single context parameter is required in the Configure() method - github.com/cornflourblue/aspnet-core-3-registration-login-api/… It maps to a different concrete type depending on the environment - github.com/cornflourblue/aspnet-core-3-registration-login-api/… – Jason Feb 4 at 8:51
  • Ok I see. Your use case is different. You only have 1 context but with two different forms. I think that's a special behavior. In general speaking, one would like to automatically migrate all datacontexts within an application on app startup. For instance, we currently have 9 datacontexts connecting to 4 different databases (all SQL server). – Sven Feb 4 at 10:40
4

This code works in .NET core 3.0

 using (var scope = app.ApplicationServices.CreateScope())
 {
     var dbContext = scope.ServiceProvider.GetService<T>();
     dbContext.Database.Migrate();
 }
| improve this answer | |
3

Based on chintan310's answer, here is how I migrate the database. This ensures separation of database-related tasks into Program.cs:

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var host = BuildWebHost(args);

        using (var scope = host.Services.CreateScope())
        {
            var services = scope.ServiceProvider;

            try
            {
                var context = services.GetService<AppDbContext>();
                context.Database.Migrate();

                var seeder = scope.ServiceProvider.GetService<AppSeeder>();
                seeder.Seed().Wait();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                var logger = services.GetRequiredService<ILogger<Program>>();
                logger.LogError(ex, "An error occurred seeding the DB.");
            }
        }

        host.Run();
    }

    private static IWebHost BuildWebHost(string[] args) =>
        WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
            .UseStartup<Startup>()
            .Build();
| improve this answer | |
1

I did this to migrate programmatically with EF Core 2.1.2 & SQL Server, based on previous answers here and bailando bailando's answer on "How and where to call Database.EnsureCreated and Database.Migrate?":

Startup.cs

using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Builder;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Hosting;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;

namespace MyApp
{
    public class Startup
    {
        // ... (only relevant code included) ...

        public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
        {
            services.AddDbContext<MyAppContext>(options => 
                options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("MyAppContext")));
            // ...
        }

        public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
        {
            using (var serviceScope = app.ApplicationServices.CreateScope())
            {
                var context = serviceScope.ServiceProvider.GetService<MyAppContext>();
                context.Database.Migrate();
            }
            // ...
        }
    }
}

The project using this code is available at Github.

| improve this answer | |
1

This is a slight correction to the previous answer which created an extension method. It fixes the error that is thrown the way it was written.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Builder;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;

namespace MyApp.Extensions
{
    public static class IApplicationBuilderExtensions
    {
        public static void SyncMigrations<T>(this IApplicationBuilder app) where T : DbContext
        {
            using (var serviceScope = app.ApplicationServices.GetRequiredService<IServiceScopeFactory>().CreateScope())
            {
                var context = serviceScope.ServiceProvider.GetService<DbContext>();
                context.Database.Migrate();
            }
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1

I followed the IStartupFilter approach to have a generic way for migrating any context.

 public class DataContextAutomaticMigrationStartupFilter<T> : IStartupFilter
  where T : DbContext
{
    /// <inheritdoc />
    public Action<IApplicationBuilder> Configure(Action<IApplicationBuilder> next)
    {
        return app =>
        {
            using (var scope = app.ApplicationServices.CreateScope())
            {
                scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<T>().Database.SetCommandTimeout(160);
                scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<T>().Database.Migrate();
            }
            next(app);
        };
    }
}

Now we're able to register the DataContexts and migration in the following way:

1st context

 services.AddDbContext<ConsumerDataContext>(options => options.UseSqlServer(configuration.GetConnectionString("ConsumerConnection")), ServiceLifetime.Transient);
    services.AddTransient<IStartupFilter, DataContextAutomaticMigrationStartupFilter<ConsumerDataContext>>();

2nd context

services.AddDbContext<UserDataContext>(options => options.UseSqlServer(configuration.GetConnectionString("UserConnection")), ServiceLifetime.Transient);
services.AddTransient<IStartupFilter, DataContextAutomaticMigrationStartupFilter<UserDataContext>>();

..and so on..

The culprit of IStartupFilter is that it only allows synchronous execution of code. For database migrations this is not an issue since we have a synchronous Migrate() method.

| improve this answer | |
0

Starting .NET Core 2 using C# 7.1, you can have an asynchronous Main method to your app, so you can call all initialization logic before you run the host, right after it has finished building:

public class Program
{
  public static async Task Main(string[] args)
  {
    //first build
    var host = CreateHostBuilder(args).Build();

    //initialize
    using (var serviceScope = host.Services.CreateScope())
    {
      var serviceProvider = serviceScope.ServiceProvider;
      var isDevelopment = 
        serviceProvider.GetRequiredService<IWebHostEnvironment>().IsDevelopment();

      using var context = serviceProvider.GetRequiredService<AppDbContext>();


      if (isDevelopment)
        await context.Database.EnsureCreatedAsync();
      else
        await context.Database.MigrateAsync();

      if (isDevelopment)
      {
        using var userManager = 
          serviceProvider.GetRequiredService<UserManager<AppUser>>();
        await userManager
          .CreateAsync(new AppUser { UserName = "dummy", Email = "dummy@dumail.com" },
          password: "1234");
      }
    }

    //now run
    host.Run();
  }

  public static IHostBuilder CreateHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
    Host.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
      .ConfigureWebHostDefaults(webBuilder =>
      {
        webBuilder.UseStartup<Startup>();
      });
}
| improve this answer | |

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