1

The example list

{
'date': array(['06/08/2016', '06/09/2016', '06/10/2016']),
'close': array([ 923.13,  914.25,  909.42])
}

I try to get the Date of close is 914.25 that is list['date'][2] but i don't know how to get index 2 for close.

Thank you.

2
  • you may consider looking at Numpy equivalent of list.index for using the second part with your already existing structure. Jun 13 '16 at 4:23
  • Thanks for wanting to add an answer. However we don't do this in questions here - if you want to add something different to the accepted answer below, feel free to add another answer. Please also don't add [solved] to titles here - I know it is popular elsewhere, but we use the tick mark to mark questions as resolved instead. Thanks!
    – halfer
    Jun 19 '16 at 13:36
2

Ideally, if you would do this kind of queries often, you should restructure your data to fit the use case better. For instance, have a dictionary where the keys are amounts and dates are values. Then, you would have quick O(1) lookups into the dictionary by key.

But, in this state of the problem, you can solve it with zip() and next():

>>> d = {
... 'date': ['06/08/2016', '06/09/2016', '06/10/2016'],
... 'close': [ 923.13,  914.25,  909.42]
... }
>>> a = 914.25
>>> next(date for date, amount in zip(d['date'], d['close']) if amount == a)
'06/09/2016'

Note that if the amount would not be found, next() would fail with a StopIteration exception. You can either handle it, or you can provide a default beforehand:

>>> a = 10.00
>>> next((date for date, amount in zip(d['date'], d['close']) if amount == a), 'Not Found')
'Not Found'
3
  • 1
    "Ideally, if you would do this kind of queries often, you should restructure your data to fit the use case better." - the best part of the answer!
    – gaganso
    Jun 13 '16 at 3:44
  • Thank you very much. @alecxe
    – Barbiyong
    Jun 13 '16 at 4:04
  • 1
    I love that part of his answer too. @SilentMonk
    – Barbiyong
    Jun 13 '16 at 4:05
1

You can try this :

>>> data = { 'date': ['06/08/2016', '06/09/2016', '06/10/2016'],'close': [ 923.13,  914.25,  909.42]}
>>> data['date'][data['close'].index(914.25)]
'06/09/2016'

Thanks to index(), you are able to get the index of the required value (914.25 in this case).

0

Where is the example from? I don't think you can have an array of strings in Python.

Assuming that the Python data structure is:

{
    'date': ['06/08/2016', '06/09/2016', '06/10/2016'],
    'close': [923.13,  914.25,  909.42]
}

and the indexes of close always matches the indexes of date, then:

In [1]: d = {
   ...:     'date': ['06/08/2016', '06/09/2016', '06/10/2016'],
   ...:     'close': [923.13,  914.25,  909.42]
   ...: }

You find the index of 914.25:

In [2]: d['close'].index(914.25)
Out[2]: 1

You find the corresponding date:

In [3]: d['date'][1]
Out[4]: '06/09/2016'

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