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Java doc says that return values of method values() and entrySet() are backed by the map. So changes to the map are reflected in the set and vice versa. I don't want this to happen to my static copy. Essentially, I want lots of concurrent operations to be done on my DS. But for some cases I want to iterate over its static snapshot. I want to iterate over static snapshot, as I am assuming iterating over static snapshot will be faster as compared to a version which is being updated concurrently.

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    Do you intend to iterate over a single static snapshot many times, or is your plan basically for (final Map.Entry<..., ...> entry : takeStaticSnapshot(map)) { doStuff(); }? (I ask because in the latter case, I don't think there's any way to take a static snapshot without implicitly iterating over the map anyway. And in either case, you should be aware that such a snapshot would not be atomic.) – ruakh Jun 13 '16 at 5:35
  • Define "snapshot". Will any copy do, or does it have to be consistent/atomic/point-in-time ? – Thilo Jun 13 '16 at 5:40
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    " I am assuming iterating over static snapshot will be faster as compared to a version which is being updated concurrently." I would profile that before jumping to conclusions / effort of snapshotting. – Thilo Jun 13 '16 at 5:44
  • stackoverflow.com/a/32141829/14955: "the performance for ConcurrentHashMap is slightly worse when you need to use it from more than one thread but it is not a critical aspect of performance that you should be worried about." – Thilo Jun 13 '16 at 5:45
  • @Thilo Thanks. What about performance of ConcurrentLinkedQueue? Is it as good or as bad as ConcurrentHashMap or Con.HashMap is faster? And yes any snapshot will do? I just need that to be approximate. – PHcoDer Jun 13 '16 at 5:54
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Simply make a copy, new HashMap would be independent of the original one.

Set<K> keySetCopy = new HashSet<>(map.keySet());
List<V> valuesCopy = new ArrayList<>(map.values());

However mind that this will take a full iteration over the concurrentStructure, once but will only then be static snapshots. So you will need time equivalent to one full iteration.

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Just make a copy, and it wont be changed.

Set<K> keySetCopy = new HashSet<>(map.keySet());
List<V> valuesCopy = new ArrayList<>(map.values());

All collection implementations have a copy constructor which will copy the entire data of the supplied collection to the newly created one, without being backed by the original.

Note: this won't work with entrySet(), as the actual Map Entries will still "belong" to the original Map and changes to the original entries will be reflected in your copies. In case you need the entrySet(), you should copy the entire Map first, with the same technique.

Set<Entry<K,V>> entrySetCopy = new HashMap<>(map).entrySet();

Note that all of these will require a full iteration ONCE (in the constructor) and will only then be static snapshots. There is no way around this limitation, to my knowledge.

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    Note that this still involves iterating over the original ConcurrentHashMap, so it may not satisfy the OP's requirements. – ruakh Jun 13 '16 at 5:39
  • @SeanPatrickFlyod Thanks. I had another doubt. Say, I have a ConcurrentHashMap CHM whose values are object of Class A. So values in CHM will be pointers of objects of type A call one of them as p. So if I make a copy of CHM.values() in an ArrayList AL. AL will contain p. Now if I make a change to a property of object p refer to. That will be reflected when I access it later from CHM. Right? – PHcoDer Jun 13 '16 at 5:40
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    Yes, the contained objects are shared, so changes will be visible in both original map and snapshot (modulo cross-thread propagation). – Thilo Jun 13 '16 at 5:42
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    I would suggest iterate entrySet(). If you iterate keySet and values, it's possible <K,V> doesn't match. Also be careful about NPE(apurvagnihotri.blogspot.com/2010/06/…) – waltersu Jun 13 '16 at 6:06
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    @Markus if the objects are mutable, yes. But I'd say that's outside the scope of this question. In fact it may even be the OP's intention to get at the original objects – Sean Patrick Floyd Jun 15 '16 at 14:29

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