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Given a simple CSV file like this:

Django,Gunslinger,101-707
KingSchultz,Dentist,205-707
Tatum,Marshall,615-707
Broomhilda,Wife,910-707
...,...,...

How do you truncate all the values in the last column so that only the first three digits remain? (unrelated: so they can be used in math operations)

Desired CSV:

Django,Gunslinger,101
KingSchultz,Dentist,205
Tatum,Marshall,615
Broomhilda,Wife,910
...,...,...

Here is what I have tried so far:

import csv
import re
r = csv.reader(open(input.csv))
for row in r:
    re.sub('\-.*', '', row[3])
writer = csv.writer(open('output.csv', 'w'))
writer.writerow(row)

I've verified the regex in re.sub works correctly. Have tried dozens of variations, many hours searching, but cannot get the desired output.

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import csv
import re

r = csv.reader(open('input.csv'))
writer = csv.writer(open('/tmp/output.csv', 'w'))

for row in r:
    tmp = re.sub('\-.*', '', row)
    writer.writerow(tmp)
0
0

Without using re module,

import csv

r = csv.reader(open("sample.csv", "rb"))
writer = csv.writer(open("output.csv", "wb"))

for row in r:
    row[2] = row[2][:3]
    writer.writerow(row)

As @TigerRedMike pointed out in Python 3.X, instead of 'rb' and 'wb', 'r' and 'w' should be used respectively to read and write the files.

3
  • Tested working on Python 2.7.6 and 3.4.3. Thank you @praba230890. I edited the answer to include a simple error that may confuse someone else on Python 3.4.3. Jun 13 '16 at 9:25
  • Can you explain the syntax of [:3]? Jun 13 '16 at 9:36
  • It's string slicing, [:3] slices the first 3 chars of a string and returns it. Check this out docs.python.org/3/tutorial/introduction.html#strings Jun 13 '16 at 10:05
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First thing is re.sub returns a new value, it doesn't replace the value in the row.

secondly, row is a running variable, you should handle this within the loop.

Here your code modified to work correctly (for python3):

import csv
import re
r = csv.reader(open('.../test.csv'))
with open('.../test2.csv', 'w') as csvfile:
    writer = csv.writer(csvfile, delimiter=',')
    for row in r:
        row[2] = re.sub('\-.*', '', row[2])
        writer.writerow(row)
2
  • Tested working on Python 2.7.6 and 3.4.3. Thank you @DomTomCat. Since this answer uses regular expressions, it will work on complex edits. Jun 13 '16 at 9:51
  • [Premature optimization is the root of all evil -- DonaldKnuth] (c2.com/cgi/wiki?PrematureOptimization) Jun 13 '16 at 10:10
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re.sub returns the string with the substitution. it does not affect the third argument itself

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