1

I have an array that may or may not look like [0, 1] and I want to test for that.

This code (inside a method) works:

sub some_other_method {
    my $self = shift;
    ...
    if (scalar @myArray == 2 && @myArray[0] == 0 && @myArray[1] == 1) {
        # this will successfully catch arrays that look like [0, 1]
    }
}

If I move the contents of the if into a separate method and then call it, it doesn't work.

sub is_warning {
    my $self = shift;
    my @array = shift;
    return scalar @array == 2 && @array[0] == 0 && @array[1] == 1;
}

...

sub some_other_method {
    my $self = shift;
    ...
    if ($self->is_warning(@myArray)) {
        # this will not catch arrays that look like [0, 1]
    }
}

If I add a print @array; to is_warning, it just prints a single number.

What am I doing wrong?

9
  • 1
    use my ($self, @array) = @_ in is_warning instead as shift only shifts one item off of @_ in a sub Jun 13 '16 at 10:56
  • @KeepCalmAndCarryOn is that the only way to pass an array by reference? Sorry, I come from c# and I'm new to perl.
    – Pyritie
    Jun 13 '16 at 10:58
  • 1
    passing by reference is explained here perldoc.perl.org/perlref.html Jun 13 '16 at 11:03
  • 2
    ALWAYS use strict; use warnings; It says: Scalar value @myArray[0] better written as $myArray[0] at ...
    – Toto
    Jun 13 '16 at 11:47
  • 2
    To reinforce @Toto's comment, unless you have no warnings 'syntax' in place, or you're using a very old version of Perl, you should have seen warning messages like Scalar value @myArray[0] better written as $myArray[0]. An array element, being a scalar, should begin with a dollar $. What you have written is a one-element array slice
    – Borodin
    Jun 13 '16 at 13:42
5

You've missed something crucial about Perl - a subroutine is only ever passed a list of scalar values in @_. So to pass an array, you need to use one of the techniques in subroutines stuff and other below.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;

sub stuff {
   my ( $arg, @other_args ) = @_;
   print Dumper \@other_args;
   print "$_\n" for @other_args;
}

sub other {
   my ( $arg, $array_ref ) = @_;
   print Dumper $array_ref;
   print "$_\n" for @$array_ref;
}

my $param = "fish";
my @array = ( "wiggle", "wobble", "boo" );

stuff( $param, @array );
other( $param, \@array );

In stuff the subroutine is handed a list of values to do with what it will. In the other, it's given two values - $param and a reference to @array.

The reason you're only getting 1 in your case, is that shift is only pulling a single value off @_. So any extra arguments are getting left behind. You'll be able to see this with;

print Dumper \@_;
1
  • 1
    I didn't know that about how arrays were passed. This fixed my problem, thank you!
    – Pyritie
    Jun 13 '16 at 11:11
-6

Please remove the my $self = shift; line from is_warning function and test it again.

Please try below script:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use Data::Dumper;

sub is_warning {

my @array = @_;
print Dumper \@_;
return scalar @array == 2 && @array[0] == 0 && @array[1] == 1;

}

sub some_other_method {

my @myArray = (0,1);
if (is_warning(@myArray)) {
 print "\nif inside some : @myArray\n";
}

}

some_other_method();

1
  • 2
    That'll break things even worse. That'll put the object as the first element of @array. Not to mention that you've just lost your ability to use $self inside the method.
    – stevieb
    Jun 13 '16 at 11:29

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