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I asked multiple question about indexes already. Something like this:

Would following queries benefit from this index? mytable(col1, col2, col3)

. . . WHERE col1 = ? AND col3 = ?
. . . WHERE col2 = ?
. . . WHERE col1 IN (?, ?)
. . . WHERE col3 = ? AND col1 NOT IN (?, ?)
. . . WHERE col1 = ? OR col2 = ?
. . . WHERE col2 = ? AND col1 = ?
. . . WHERE col1 = ? AND col2 > ?
. . . WHERE col1 = ? AND col3 > ?

-- each question was containing one of these queries ;-)

Every time I got an answer for that specific query which was mentioned in that question, and still I cannot judge such a index would be useful for such a query or not. (or how making it more optimal)

So I decided to ask this question and want to know about the backstage. What happens when I create an index on a column? An index is made of what? An multiple column index is containing what rows (because order is important)? How it works which causes a query much faster?

Actually I need some information about indexes to make me able how can I determine a proper index (multiple columns or single column) for a query.

Note: I have some experiences to work with EXPLAIN. And yes I know using EXPLAIN is really useful in these cases. Now I just need some further information.

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An index puts the value, or part of the value in RAM so its faster to access. An index with more than one column aggregates the contents.

So an index with (col1, col2, col3) will be useful for all queries that contain col1 lookups, because col1 is the left-most.

It will be even more beneficial for lookups of col1 and col2, because after getting all the matches for col1, then it can use the col2 part too.

Finally, the col3 part will only ever be used if col1 and col2 have been used already, so its unlikely that it will be useful. But it may be.

  • Great explanations .. thank you .. upvote – Martin AJ Jun 13 '16 at 11:47
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This eval are based only on the where clause you show ... can change depending of the select column

    . . . WHERE col1 = ? AND col3 = ?               yes partial (only col1)
    . . . WHERE col2 = ?                            no
    . . . WHERE col1 IN (?, ?)                      yes 
    . . . WHERE col3 = ? AND col1 NOT IN (?, ?)     yes partial (only col1)
    . . . WHERE col1 = ? OR col2 = ?                yes
    . . . WHERE col2 = ? AND col1 = ?               yes
    . . . WHERE col1 = ? AND col2 > ?               yes 
    . . . WHERE col1 = ? AND col3 > ?               yes partial (only col1)

for a good explanation of how index work on mysql you can see this ref http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/mysql-indexes.html

from the doc

MySQL uses indexes for these operations:

To find the rows matching a WHERE clause quickly.

To eliminate rows from consideration. If there is a choice between multiple indexes, MySQL normally uses the index that finds the smallest number of rows (the most selective index). If the table has a multiple-column index, any leftmost prefix of the index can be used by the optimizer to look up rows. For example, if you have a three-column index on (col1, col2, col3), you have indexed search capabilities on (col1), (col1, col2), and (col1, col2, col3). For more information, see Section 9.3.5, “Multiple-Column Indexes”.

To retrieve rows from other tables when performing joins. MySQL can use indexes on columns more efficiently if they are declared as the same type and size. In this context, VARCHAR and CHAR are considered the same if they are declared as the same size. For example, VARCHAR(10) and CHAR(10) are the same size, but VARCHAR(10) and CHAR(15) are not.

For comparisons between nonbinary string columns, both columns should use the same character set. For example, comparing a utf8 column with a latin1 column precludes use of an index.

Comparison of dissimilar columns (comparing a string column to a temporal or numeric column, for example) may prevent use of indexes if values cannot be compared directly without conversion. For a given value such as 1 in the numeric column, it might compare equal to any number of values in the string column such as '1', ' 1', '00001', or '01.e1'. This rules out use of any indexes for the string column.

To find the MIN() or MAX() value for a specific indexed column key_col. This is optimized by a preprocessor that checks whether you are using WHERE key_part_N = constant on all key parts that occur before key_col in the index. In this case, MySQL does a single key lookup for each MIN() or MAX() expression and replaces it with a constant. If all expressions are replaced with constants, the query returns at once. For example:

To sort or group a table if the sorting or grouping is done on a leftmost prefix of a usable index (for example, ORDER BY key_part1, key_part2). If all key parts are followed by DESC, the key is read in reverse order. See Section 9.2.1.15, “ORDER BY Optimization”, and Section 9.2.1.16, “GROUP BY Optimization”.

In some cases, a query can be optimized to retrieve values without consulting the data rows. (An index that provides all the necessary results for a query is called a covering index.) If a query uses from a table only columns that are included in some index, the selected values can be retrieved from the index tree for greater speed:

  • Thank you ... upvote – Martin AJ Jun 13 '16 at 11:46
  • Thank @Stack .. i have added some part of doc by mysql .. hope useful – scaisEdge Jun 13 '16 at 11:47
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Well, there is never a correct answer about indexing , the correct answer will be different each time depending on the size of your data, the types of the columns and ETC.

When deciding which indexes is best for a table you should consider the following:

  • What are the most common functions I am doing on this table?
  • How many times a day this functions occuring?
  • What are the slowest queries that affect my performance the most?

After that, when you have the queries you actually need to improve (An update that happens a lot, a select/join and ETC) you can decide which is the correct indexes with the explain plan from each query.

You should know that when indexing like your example mytable(col1, col2, col3) , it will be able to use even part of the index as long as the column needed is mentioned first in the index

So, every use of Col1 will indeed be able to use this index. Col2 will be used only in case it is combined with Col1 as well and so on for Col3 (has to be combined with both col1 and col2 in order to be used).

You can find a lot of information about indexing on MySQL documantation .

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    I see .. thank you .. upvote – Martin AJ Jun 13 '16 at 11:47
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Would following queries benefit from this index mytable(col1, col2, col3)

. . . WHERE col1 = ? AND col3 = ?

col1 benefits from the index and for col3 residual predicate may be used

. . . WHERE col2 = ?

SQL may choose to scan the index you have if it is cost effective,so in summary this wont be used

. . . WHERE col1 IN (?, ?)

Index will be used

. . . WHERE col3 = ? AND col1 NOT IN (?, ?)

col1 benefits from the index and for col3 residual predicate will be used

. . . WHERE col1 = ? OR col2 = ?

Index will be used

. . . WHERE col2 = ? AND col1 = ?

Index will be used

. . . WHERE col1 = ? AND col2 > ?

Index will be used

. . . WHERE col1 = ? AND col3 > ?

Index will be used

A residual predicate is a probe which SQL applies to rows left over after applying first index.

  • Ok .. thank you .. upvote – Martin AJ Jun 13 '16 at 11:55

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