266

Back in RC1, I would do this:

[HttpPost]
public IActionResult Post([FromBody]string something)
{    
    try{
        // ...
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
         return new HttpStatusCodeResult((int)HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError);
    }
}

In RC2, there no longer is HttpStatusCodeResult, and there is nothing I can find that lets me return a 500 type of IActionResult.

Is the approach now entirely different for what I'm asking? Do we no longer try-catch in Controller code? Do we just let the framework throw a generic 500 exception back to the API caller? For development, how can I see the exact exception stack?

319

From what I can see there are helper methods inside the ControllerBase class. Just use the StatusCode method:

[HttpPost]
public IActionResult Post([FromBody] string something)
{    
    //...
    try
    {
        DoSomething();
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
         LogException(e);
         return StatusCode(500);
    }
}

You may also use the StatusCode(int statusCode, object value) overload which also negotiates the content.

3
  • 9
    doing this, we lose the CORS headers, so errors are hidden from browser clients. V frustrating.
    – bbsimonbb
    May 4 '18 at 13:01
  • 3
    @bbsimonbb Internal errors should be hidden from clients. They should be logged for developers. Sep 29 '18 at 11:34
  • 19
    Developers should have, have traditionally enjoyed, the prerogative to choose what level of error information is returned.
    – bbsimonbb
    Sep 29 '18 at 12:40
226

You could use Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.ControllerBase.StatusCode and Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http.StatusCodes to form your response, if you don't wish to hardcode specific numbers.

return  StatusCode(StatusCodes.Status500InternalServerError);

UPDATE: Aug 2019

Perhaps not directly related to the original question but when trying to achieve the same result with Microsoft Azure Functions I found that I had to construct a new StatusCodeResult object found in the Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.Core assembly. My code now looks like this;

return new StatusCodeResult(StatusCodes.Status500InternalServerError);
4
  • 13
    Great one, avoids any hardcoded parts/"magic numbers". I've used StatusCode((int)HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError) before but I like yours better.
    – aleor
    Dec 9 '16 at 8:43
  • 2
    One thing I didn't consider at the time is that it makes the code more readable, coming back to it you know what error number 500 relates to, it's right there in the code. Self documenting :-) Dec 9 '16 at 14:38
  • 18
    I can't imagine internal server error (500) changing anytime soon.
    – rollsch
    Oct 17 '17 at 6:39
  • 3
    awesome. this also really cleans up my swagger attributes. ex: [ProducesResponseType(StatusCodes.Status500InternalServerError)] Oct 19 '17 at 16:35
70

If you need a body in your response, you can call

return StatusCode(StatusCodes.Status500InternalServerError, responseObject);

This will return a 500 with the response object...

1
  • 7
    If you don't want to create a specific response object type: return StatusCode(StatusCodes.Status500InternalServerError, new { message = "error occurred" }); And of course, you can add as descriptive a message as you like, and other elements as well. Oct 15 '19 at 18:45
23

A better way to handle this as of now (1.1) is to do this in Startup.cs's Configure():

app.UseExceptionHandler("/Error");

This will execute the route for /Error. This will save you from adding try-catch blocks to every action you write.

Of course, you'll need to add an ErrorController similar to this:

[Route("[controller]")]
public class ErrorController : Controller
{
    [Route("")]
    [AllowAnonymous]
    public IActionResult Get()
    {
        return StatusCode(StatusCodes.Status500InternalServerError);
    }
}

More information here.


In case you want to get the actual exception data, you may add this to the above Get() right before the return statement.

// Get the details of the exception that occurred
var exceptionFeature = HttpContext.Features.Get<IExceptionHandlerPathFeature>();

if (exceptionFeature != null)
{
    // Get which route the exception occurred at
    string routeWhereExceptionOccurred = exceptionFeature.Path;

    // Get the exception that occurred
    Exception exceptionThatOccurred = exceptionFeature.Error;

    // TODO: Do something with the exception
    // Log it with Serilog?
    // Send an e-mail, text, fax, or carrier pidgeon?  Maybe all of the above?
    // Whatever you do, be careful to catch any exceptions, otherwise you'll end up with a blank page and throwing a 500
}

Above snippet taken from Scott Sauber's blog.

4
  • this is awesome, but how can i log the exception that was thrown? Oct 19 '17 at 16:54
  • @redwards510 Here's how you do it: scottsauber.com/2017/04/03/… I'll update my answer to reflect it, since it's a very common use case 😊
    – galdin
    Oct 20 '17 at 10:13
  • @gldraphael We are currently using Core 2.1. Scott's blog is great, but I'm curious if using IExceptionHandlerPathFeature is currently the recommended best practices. Perhaps creating custom middleware is better?
    – Pavel
    Oct 24 '18 at 17:22
  • @Pavel we are using the ExceptionHandler middleware here. You may, of course, roll your own or extend it as you see fit. Here's the link to the sources. EDIT: See this line for IExceptionHandlerPathFeature .
    – galdin
    Oct 24 '18 at 17:32
21

For aspnetcore-3.1, you can also use Problem() like below;

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/web-api/handle-errors?view=aspnetcore-3.1

 [Route("/error-local-development")]
public IActionResult ErrorLocalDevelopment(
    [FromServices] IWebHostEnvironment webHostEnvironment)
{
    if (webHostEnvironment.EnvironmentName != "Development")
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException(
            "This shouldn't be invoked in non-development environments.");
    }

    var context = HttpContext.Features.Get<IExceptionHandlerFeature>();

    return Problem(
        detail: context.Error.StackTrace,
        title: context.Error.Message);
}
1
  • the same is true for NET5
    – RickWeb
    Nov 24 '20 at 12:11
20
return StatusCode((int)HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError, e);

Should be used in non-ASP.NET contexts (see other answers for ASP.NET Core).

HttpStatusCode is an enumeration in System.Net.

19

How about creating a custom ObjectResult class that represents an Internal Server Error like the one for OkObjectResult? You can put a simple method in your own base class so that you can easily generate the InternalServerError and return it just like you do Ok() or BadRequest().

[Route("api/[controller]")]
[ApiController]
public class MyController : MyControllerBase
{
    [HttpGet]
    [Route("{key}")]
    public IActionResult Get(int key)
    {
        try
        {
            //do something that fails
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            LogException(e);
            return InternalServerError();
        }
    }
}

public class MyControllerBase : ControllerBase
{
    public InternalServerErrorObjectResult InternalServerError()
    {
        return new InternalServerErrorObjectResult();
    }

    public InternalServerErrorObjectResult InternalServerError(object value)
    {
        return new InternalServerErrorObjectResult(value);
    }
}

public class InternalServerErrorObjectResult : ObjectResult
{
    public InternalServerErrorObjectResult(object value) : base(value)
    {
        StatusCode = StatusCodes.Status500InternalServerError;
    }

    public InternalServerErrorObjectResult() : this(null)
    {
        StatusCode = StatusCodes.Status500InternalServerError;
    }
}
9

When you want to return a JSON response in MVC .Net Core You can also use:

Response.StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError;//Equals to HTTPResponse 500
return Json(new { responseText = "my error" });

This will return both JSON result and HTTPStatus. I use it for returning results to jQuery.ajax().

1
  • 1
    I had to use return new JsonResult ... but otherwise worked great. Oct 15 '19 at 18:35
0

The built-in Problem()-method of Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc will return a "problem detail"-response based on RFC 7807 (in ASP.NET Core 3.0 and later). It will always return status-code 500 as long as no other status is explicitly set.

[HttpPost]
public IActionResult Post([FromBody] string value)
{
    try
    {
        // ...
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        return Problem(
            //all parameters are optional:
            //detail: "Error while processing posted data."; //an explanation, ex.Stacktrace, ...
            //instance: "/city/London"  //A reference that identifies the specific occurrence of the problem
            //title: "An error occured." //a short title, maybe ex.Message
            //statusCode: StatusCodes.Status504GatewayTimeout, //will always return code 500 if not explicitly set
            //type: "http://example.com/errors/error-123-details"  //a reference to more information
            );
    }           
}

Without setting any parameters it will return this:

{
    "type": "https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7231#section-6.6.1",
    "title": "An error occured while processing your request.",
    "status": 500,
    "traceId": "|fadaed95-4d06eb16160e4996."
}

More infos about "problem details" parameters: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/microsoft.aspnetcore.mvc.problemdetails?view=aspnetcore-5.0

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