79

I'm trying to find the best way to do a 'reverse lookup' on an enum in Kotlin. One of my takeaways from Effective Java was that you introduce a static map inside the enum to handle the reverse lookup. Porting this over to Kotlin with a simple enum leads me to code that looks like this:

enum class Type(val value: Int) {
    A(1),
    B(2),
    C(3);

    companion object {
        val map: MutableMap<Int, Type> = HashMap()

        init {
            for (i in Type.values()) {
                map[i.value] = i
            } 
        }

        fun fromInt(type: Int?): Type? {
            return map[type]
        }
    }
}

My question is, is this the best way to do this, or is there a better way? What if I have several enums that follow a similar pattern? Is there a way in Kotlin to make this code more re-usable across enums?

141

First of all, the argument of fromInt() should be an Int, not an Int?. Trying to get a Type using null will obviously lead to null, and a caller shouldn't even try doing that. The Map has also no reason to be mutable. The code can be reduced to:

companion object {
    private val map = Type.values().associateBy(Type::value)
    fun fromInt(type: Int) = map[type]
}

That code is so short that, frankly, I'm not sure it's worth trying to find a reusable solution.

  • 6
    I was about to recommend the same. In addition, I would make fromInt return non-null like Enum.valueOf(String): map[type] ?: throw IllegalArgumentException() – mfulton26 Jun 13 '16 at 17:31
  • 4
    Given the kotlin support for null-safety, returning null from the method wouldn't bother me as it would in Java: the caller will be forced by the compiler to deal with a null returned value, and decide what to do (throw or do something else). – JB Nizet Jun 13 '16 at 17:35
  • 1
    @Raphael because enums were introduced in Java 5 and Optional in Java 8. – JB Nizet Mar 24 '17 at 19:55
  • 1
    my version of this code use by lazy{} for the map and getOrDefault() for safer access by value – Hoang Tran Feb 22 '18 at 15:39
  • 2
    This solution works well. Note that to be able to call Type.fromInt() from Java code, you will need to annotate the method with @JvmStatic. – Arto Bendiken May 17 '18 at 14:38
25

It makes not much sense in this case, but here is a "logic extraction" for @JBNized's solution:

open class EnumCompanion<T, V>(private val valueMap: Map<T, V>) {
    fun fromInt(type: T) = valueMap[type]
}

enum class TT(val x: Int) {
    A(10),
    B(20),
    C(30);

    companion object : EnumCompanion<Int, TT>(TT.values().associateBy(TT::x))
}

//sorry I had to rename things for sanity

In general that's the thing about companion objects that they can be reused (unlike static members in a Java class)

22

we can use find which Returns the first element matching the given predicate, or null if no such element was found.

companion object {
   fun valueOf(value: Int): Type? = Type.values().find { it.value == value }
}
  • 3
    An obvious enhancement is using first { ... } instead because there is no use for multiple results. – creativecreatorormaybenot Mar 14 '18 at 21:57
  • 8
    No, using first is not an enhancement as it changes the behavior and throws NoSuchElementException if the item is not found where find which is equal to firstOrNull returns null. so if you want to throw instead of returning null use first – humazed Aug 1 '18 at 18:49
  • This method can be used with enums with multiple values: fun valueFrom(valueA: Int, valueB: String): EnumType? = values().find { it.valueA == valueA && it.valueB == valueB } Also you can throw an exception if the values are not in the enum: fun valueFrom( ... ) = values().find { ... } ?: throw Exception("any message") or you can use it when calling this method: var enumValue = EnumType.valueFrom(valueA, valueB) ?: throw Exception( ...) – ecth Jun 5 at 6:30
6

I found myself doing the reverse lookup by custom, hand coded, value couple of times and came of up with following approach.

Make enums implement a shared interface:

interface Codified<out T : Serializable> {
    val code: T
}

enum class Alphabet(val value: Int) : Codified<Int> {
    A(1),
    B(2),
    C(3);

    override val code = value
}

This interface (however strange the name is :)) marks a certain value as the explicit code. The goal is to be able to write:

val a = Alphabet::class.decode(1) //Alphabet.A
val d = Alphabet::class.tryDecode(4) //null

Which can easily be achieved with the following code:

interface Codified<out T : Serializable> {
    val code: T

    object Enums {
        private val enumCodesByClass = ConcurrentHashMap<Class<*>, Map<Serializable, Enum<*>>>()

        inline fun <reified T, TCode : Serializable> decode(code: TCode): T where T : Codified<TCode>, T : Enum<*> {
            return decode(T::class.java, code)
        }

        fun <T, TCode : Serializable> decode(enumClass: Class<T>, code: TCode): T where T : Codified<TCode> {
            return tryDecode(enumClass, code) ?: throw IllegalArgumentException("No $enumClass value with code == $code")
        }

        inline fun <reified T, TCode : Serializable> tryDecode(code: TCode): T? where T : Codified<TCode> {
            return tryDecode(T::class.java, code)
        }

        @Suppress("UNCHECKED_CAST")
        fun <T, TCode : Serializable> tryDecode(enumClass: Class<T>, code: TCode): T? where T : Codified<TCode> {
            val valuesForEnumClass = enumCodesByClass.getOrPut(enumClass as Class<Enum<*>>, {
                enumClass.enumConstants.associateBy { (it as T).code }
            })

            return valuesForEnumClass[code] as T?
        }
    }
}

fun <T, TCode> KClass<T>.decode(code: TCode): T
        where T : Codified<TCode>, T : Enum<T>, TCode : Serializable 
        = Codified.Enums.decode(java, code)

fun <T, TCode> KClass<T>.tryDecode(code: TCode): T?
        where T : Codified<TCode>, T : Enum<T>, TCode : Serializable
        = Codified.Enums.tryDecode(java, code)
  • 3
    That's a lot of work for such a simple operation, the accepted answer is much cleaner IMO – Connor Wyatt Dec 18 '16 at 10:52
  • 1
    Fully agree for simple use it's definitely better. I had the above code already to handle explicit names for given enumerated member. – miensol Dec 18 '16 at 14:58
2

Another option, that could be considered more "idiomatic", would be the following:

companion object {
    private val map = Type.values().associateBy(Type::value)
    operator fun get(value: Int) = map[value]
}

Which can then be used like Type[type].

0

A variant of some previous proposals might be the following, using ordinal field and getValue :

enum class Type {
A, B, C;

companion object {
    private val map = values().associateBy(Type::ordinal)

    fun fromInt(number: Int): Type {
        require(number in 0 until map.size) { "number out of bounds (must be positive or zero & inferior to map.size)." }
        return map.getValue(number)
    }
}

}

0

Another example implementation. This also sets the default value (here to OPEN) if no the input matches no enum option:

enum class Status(val status: Int) {
OPEN(1),
CLOSED(2);

companion object {
    @JvmStatic
    fun fromInt(status: Int): Status =
        values().find { value -> value.status == status } ?: OPEN
}

}

-3

val t = Type.values()[ordinal]

:)

  • This works for constants 0, 1, ..., N. If you have them like 100, 50, 35, then it won't give a right result. – CoolMind Dec 27 '18 at 13:31

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