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This feels like a stupid question, but I can't find the answer anywhere in the Java documentation. If I declare two ints and then divide them, what exactly is happening? Are they converted to floats/doubles first, divided, then cast back to an integer, or is the division "done" as integers?

Also, purely from experimentation, integer division seems to round the answer towards zero (i.e. 3/2 = 1 and -3/2 = -1). Am I right in believing this?

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  • No conversion occurs. They are divided as ints. And -3/2 == -1. Jun 13, 2016 at 16:59
  • the simple way of thinking about it is they are divided, and anything less than a full int is truncated. Jun 13, 2016 at 16:59
  • @AndyTurner "-3/2 = 1" was a silly typo on my part, sorry!
    – MadMonty
    Jun 13, 2016 at 17:04
  • Int division in a computer basically is very similar to how you would do long division with paper and pencil to get a quotient and a remainder. The main difference is, the computer does it in base 2 instead of base 10. When you divide with '/', the result is the quotient, and the remainder is thrown away. When you divide with '%', you get the remainder, and the quotient is thrown away. Jun 13, 2016 at 17:10

2 Answers 2

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They are being divided in integer arithmetics. So dividing integer a by integer b you get how many times b fits into a. Also a % b will give you a remainder of a division. So (a / b ) * b + a % b = a

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Java does autoconvert types:

"It autoconverts ints to doubles. It autoconverts shorts and bytes to ints even when no ints are involved, requiring constant annoying casts when you want to do short or byte arithmetic. It autoconverts primitives to wrappers and vice versa for boxing and autoboxing." - user2357112

Java never casts anything without you specifying it.

But still integer / integer = integer.

Also, it does always truncate the result. So if the result would be 0.999999 as float the integer division would still return 0.

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  • No, it always rounds towards zero. Jun 13, 2016 at 17:03
  • I meant that, sorry Jun 13, 2016 at 17:04
  • I believe you meant truncate Jun 13, 2016 at 17:05
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    "Java never casts anything without you specifying it" - it totally does. It autoconverts ints to doubles. It autoconverts shorts and bytes to ints even when no ints are involved, requiring constant annoying casts when you want to do short or byte arithmetic. It autoconverts primitives to wrappers and vice versa for boxing and autoboxing. Jun 13, 2016 at 17:13
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    Okay, I'm sorry. I edited the answer. Jun 13, 2016 at 17:21

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