3

I have this Method# 1 query below that is parameterized using dapper, problem is the query times out with this approach even after waiting 30sec and normally it takes max of 1 sec on SSMS with plain sql.

However Method # 2 query actually works where the query is built on the server side instead of parameterized one. One thing i have noticed is, it might have something to do with filter for FirstName and LastName, I have single Quote on Method #2 for those filter but not for Method #1.

What is wrong with Method # 1 ?

Method # 1

string query = "SELECT *
                FROM dbo.Customer c                
                WHERE c.MainCustomerId = @CustomerId 
                AND (@IgnoreCustomerId = 1 OR c.CustomerID = @FilterCustomerId)
                AND (@IgnoreFirstName = 1 OR c.FirstName = @FilterFirstName)
                AND (@IgnoreLastName = 1 OR c.LastName = @FilterLastName)
                AND (@IgnoreMemberStatus = 1 OR c.CustomerStatusID = @FilterMemberStatus)
                AND (@IgnoreMemberType = 1 OR c.CustomerTypeID = @FilterMemberType)
                AND (@IgnoreRank = 1 OR c.RankID = @FilterRank)
                ORDER BY c.CustomerId
                OFFSET @OffSet ROWS
                FETCH NEXT 50 ROWS ONLY";       



                _procExecutor.ExecuteSqlAsync<Report>(query, new
            {
                CustomerId = customerId,
                IgnoreCustomerId = ignoreCustomerId,
                FilterCustomerId = filter.CustomerID,
                IgnoreFirstName = ignoreFirstName,
                FilterFirstName = filter.FirstName,
                IgnoreLastName = ignoreLastName,
                FilterLastName = filter.LastName,
                IgnoreMemberStatus = ignoreMemberStatus,
                FilterMemberStatus = Convert.ToInt32(filter.MemberStatus),
                IgnoreMemberType = ignoreMemberType,
                FilterMemberType = Convert.ToInt32(filter.MemberType),
                IgnoreRank = ignoreRank,
                FilterRank = Convert.ToInt32(filter.Rank),
                OffSet = (page - 1) * 50
            });


    Method # 2      

            string queryThatWorks =
                            "SELECT *
                 FROM dbo.Customer c                
                WHERE c.MainCustomerId = @CustomerId 
                AND ({1} = 1 OR c.CustomerID = {2})
                AND ({3} = 1 OR c.FirstName = '{4}')
                AND ({5}= 1 OR c.LastName = '{6}')
                AND ({7} = 1 OR c.CustomerStatusID = {8})
                AND ({9} = 1 OR c.CustomerTypeID = {10})
                AND ({11} = 1 OR c.RankID = {12})
                ORDER BY c.CustomerId
                OFFSET {13} ROWS
                FETCH NEXT 50 ROWS ONLY";

                _procExecutor.ExecuteSqlAsync<Report>(string.Format(queryThatWorks,
                customerId,
                ignoreCustomerId,
                filter.CustomerID,
                ignoreFirstName,
                filter.FirstName,
                ignoreLastName,
                filter.LastName,
                ignoreMemberStatus,
                 Convert.ToInt32(filter.MemberStatus),
                 ignoreMemberType,
                 Convert.ToInt32(filter.MemberType),
                 ignoreRank,
                  Convert.ToInt32(filter.Rank),
                 (page - 1) * 50
                ), null);
  • Do you know how to get the execution plan XML? If so, post it. That's always the first step when trying to figure this kind of thing out. – Jonathan Allen Jun 13 '16 at 17:28
  • since one query is parameterized via dapper another is plain sql, i could get execution plan for plain sql (but this run fast). for parmeterized one i am not sure i can generate a execution plan – Justin Homes Jun 13 '16 at 17:30
  • To get the execution plan for Dapper, use the SQL Profiler tool. This will capture the actual SQL being sent to the database. From there you can paste it into SSMS and get the plan as normal. – Jonathan Allen Jun 13 '16 at 17:34
  • Out of curiosity, why do you use the 'ignoreColumn' approach instead of simply testing for nullability: (@firstName IS NULL OR c.FirstName = @firstname)...just would reduce the number of parameters substantially. – BlackjacketMack Jun 16 '16 at 0:12
5

I've seen this countless times before.

I'm willing to bet that your columns are varChar, but Dapper is sending in your parameters as nVarChar. When that happens, SQL Server has to run a conversion on the value stored in each and every row. Besides being really slow, this prevents you from using indexes.

See "Ansi Strings and varchar" in https://github.com/StackExchange/dapper-dot-net

| improve this answer | |
  • That's why I'm creating my own ORM, Tortuga Chain. It will auto-detect which parameter type to use when making normal queries. – Jonathan Allen Jun 13 '16 at 19:02

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