436

In Swift 2, I was able to use dispatch_after to delay an action using grand central dispatch:

var dispatchTime: dispatch_time_t = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, Int64(0.1 * Double(NSEC_PER_SEC))) 
dispatch_after(dispatchTime, dispatch_get_main_queue(), { 
    // your function here 
})

But this no longer seems to compile since Swift 3. What is the preferred way to write this in modern Swift?

  • 6
    Further information about the migration process can be found here: https://swift.org/migration-guide/ The section "Dispatch" is the relevant for this question – tonik12 Jun 14 '16 at 12:53
  • should your question be UInt64? – Honey Apr 10 '17 at 20:48

13 Answers 13

1101

The syntax is simply:

// to run something in 0.1 seconds

DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 0.1) {
    // your code here
}

Note, the above syntax of adding seconds as a Double seems to be a source of confusion (esp since we were accustomed to adding nsec). That "add seconds as Double" syntax works because deadline is a DispatchTime and, behind the scenes, there is a + operator that will take a Double and add that many seconds to the DispatchTime:

public func +(time: DispatchTime, seconds: Double) -> DispatchTime

But, if you really want to add an integer number of msec, μs, or nsec to the DispatchTime, you can also add a DispatchTimeInterval to a DispatchTime. That means you can do:

DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + .milliseconds(500)) {
    os_log("500 msec seconds later")
}

DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + .microseconds(1_000_000)) {
    os_log("1m μs seconds later")
}

DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + .nanoseconds(1_500_000_000)) {
    os_log("1.5b nsec seconds later")
}

These all seamlessly work because of this separate overload method for the + operator in the DispatchTime class.

public func +(time: DispatchTime, interval: DispatchTimeInterval) -> DispatchTime

It was asked how one goes about canceling a dispatched task. To do this, use DispatchWorkItem. For example, this starts a task that will fire in five seconds, or if the view controller is dismissed and deallocated, its deinit will cancel the task:

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    private var item: DispatchWorkItem?

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        item = DispatchWorkItem { [weak self] in
            self?.doSomething()
            self?.item = nil
        }

        DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 5, execute: item!)
    }

    deinit {
        item?.cancel()
    }

    func doSomething() { ... }

}

Note the use of the [weak self] capture list in the DispatchWorkItem. This is essential to avoid a strong reference cycle. Also note that this does not do a preemptive cancelation, but rather just stops the task from starting if it hasn’t already. But if it has already started by the time it encounters the cancel() call, the block will finish its execution (unless you’re manually checking isCancelled inside the block).

  • 5
    Thanks for pointing that out, and in fact swift.org/migration-guide mentions the need to make that change by hand. – matt Jun 14 '16 at 15:36
  • 1
    Oh, sorry. It's way too late here :). Thought that all the mess should go actually, but didn't take the leap. IMO the "simple" solution is the-one-true-solution. – tobiasdm Jun 15 '16 at 2:02
  • 1
    @Rob how would I go about canceling it? Thanks. – kemicofa supports Monica Oct 4 '16 at 9:12
  • Ok so how do you add a dynamic wait? For example, I have a let number : Float = 1.0. And .now() + .milliseconds(number) doesn't work. Nor does Double(number). I can't figure it out. – Kjell Nov 3 '16 at 1:25
  • 2
    The DispatchTimeInterval renditions, like .milliseconds require Int. But if just adding seconds, I'd use Double, e.g. let n: Double = 1.0; queue.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + n) { ... }. – Rob Nov 10 '16 at 17:01
128

Swift 4:

DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + .milliseconds(100)) {
   // Code
}

For the time .seconds(Int), .microseconds(Int) and .nanoseconds(Int) may also be used.

  • 7
    .milliseconds is better than Double. – DawnSong Oct 21 '16 at 13:33
  • 5
    Very nice. A note for others: you can also use any of the other DispatchTimeInterval enum values too. case seconds(Int) case milliseconds(Int) case microseconds(Int) case nanoseconds(Int) – Rob MacEachern Oct 28 '16 at 17:17
  • @RobMacEachern, thanks that´s a good suggestion I add it to the answer. – Hannes Sverrisson Oct 28 '16 at 17:24
  • 2
    .milliseconds is better than Double. -- I want that on a T-shirt ;). – Chris Prince Jan 5 '18 at 0:43
58

If you just want the delay function in

Swift 4 & 5

func delay(interval: TimeInterval, closure: @escaping () -> Void) {
     DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + interval) {
          closure()
     }
}

You can use it like:

delay(interval: 1) { 
    print("Hi!")
}
  • DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: ) does not work. It says it does not overload any method from its superclass. – Fabrizio Bartolomucci Aug 3 '16 at 13:19
  • Are you using the same xcode version as specified? – rockdaswift Aug 3 '16 at 13:28
  • 7
    DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 0.1, execute: closure) is simpler. – DawnSong Oct 21 '16 at 13:29
16

after Swift 3 release, also the @escaping has to be added

func delay(_ delay: Double, closure: @escaping () -> ()) {
  DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + delay) {
    closure()
  }
}
5

A somewhat different flavour of the Accepted Answer.

Swift 4

DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 0.1 + .milliseconds(500) + 
.microseconds(500) + .nanoseconds(1000)) {
                print("Delayed by 0.1 second + 500 milliseconds + 500 microseconds + 
                      1000 nanoseconds)")
 }
5

Swift 4

You can create a extension on DispatchQueue and add function delay which uses DispatchQueue asyncAfter function internally

extension DispatchQueue {
   static func delay(_ delay: DispatchTimeInterval, closure: @escaping () -> ()) {
      DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + delay, execute: closure)
   }
}

and use

DispatchQueue.delay(.milliseconds(10)) {
   print("task to be done")
}
  • 2
    How is this different from @rockdaswift’s answer? – brandonscript Jun 24 '17 at 16:09
  • as I mentioned it wraps asyncAfter inside performAfter function which takes delay as parameter and it can be easier to call using just performAfter(delay: 2) { } – Suhit Patil Jun 24 '17 at 16:19
  • Closure parameters are non-escaping by default, @escaping indicate that a closure parameter may escape. added @ escaping parameter in closure to save potential crash. – Suhit Patil Jun 24 '17 at 16:59
3

call DispatchQueue.main.after(when: DispatchTime, execute: () -> Void)

I'd highly recommend using the Xcode tools to convert to Swift 3 (Edit > Convert > To Current Swift Syntax). It caught this for me

3

In Swift 4.1 and Xcode 9.4.1

Simple answer is...

//To call function after 5 seconds time
DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 5.0) {
//Here call your function
}
  • 3
    Not sure how this is different than the accepted answer? – brandonscript Aug 18 '18 at 6:35
2

Swift 5 and above

DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 2, execute: {
   // code to execute                 
})
  • thank you, so weird this has changed to markedly – Mr Heelis Oct 22 at 15:49
1

None of the answers mentioned running on a non-main thread, so adding my 2 cents.

On main queue (main thread)

let mainQueue = DispatchQueue.main
let deadline = DispatchTime.now() + .seconds(10)
mainQueue.asyncAfter(deadline: deadline) {
    // ...
}

OR

DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: DispatchTime.now() + .seconds(10)) { 
    // ...
}

On global queue (non main thread, based on QOS specified) .

let backgroundQueue = DispatchQueue.global()
let deadline = DispatchTime.now() + .milliseconds(100)
backgroundQueue.asyncAfter(deadline: deadline, qos: .background) { 
    // ...
}

OR

DispatchQueue.global().asyncAfter(deadline: DispatchTime.now() + .milliseconds(100), qos: .background) {
    // ...
}
0

This worked for me in Swift 3

let time1 = 8.23
let time2 = 3.42

// Delay 2 seconds


DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 2.0) {
    print("Sum of times: \(time1 + time2)")
}
  • 4
    Not sure how this differs from the accepted answer? – brandonscript Mar 30 '17 at 15:25
0

You can use

DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + .microseconds(100)) {
        // Code
    }
0

try this

let when = DispatchTime.now() + 1.5
    DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: when) {
        //some code
    }
  • Not sure how this is different from the affected answer? – brandonscript Nov 7 '17 at 15:18

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