29

I have three tables: R, S and P.

Table R Joins with S through a foreign key; there should be at least one record in S, so I can JOIN:

SELECT
        *
    FROM 
        R
    JOIN    S ON (S.id = R.fks)

If there's no record in S then I get no rows, that's fine.

Then table S joins with P, where records is P may or may not be present and joined with S.

So I do

SELECT
        *
    FROM 
        R
    JOIN    S ON (S.id = R.fks)
    LEFT JOIN P ON (P.id = S.fkp)

What if I wanted the second JOIN to be tied to S not to R, like if I could use parentheses:

SELECT
        *
    FROM 
        R
    JOIN    (S ON (S.id = R.fks) JOIN P ON (P.id = S.fkp))

Or is that already a natural behaviour of the cartesian product between R, S and P?

5
  • 2
    Can you elaborate this part "What if I wanted the second JOIN to be tied to S not to R" Right now the tables are joined as R joining with S and then left join with P. Sep 23, 2010 at 16:05
  • I'm trying to understand if there's a way I can give precedence to joins, like if they were arithmetic operators. I don't get if this is implicit in the join condition or not.
    – vulkanino
    Sep 23, 2010 at 16:08
  • Give a us a data example of what you are hoping to achieve that is differnt than an ordinary join and we can better show you what to do. It is possible a derived table may do what you want, but I'm not sure exactly what you want.
    – HLGEM
    Sep 23, 2010 at 17:25
  • 3
    Oracle DB supports parentheses almost exactly as you asked. Oct 21, 2015 at 13:48
  • continuing @DavidBalažic comment - here's the documentation for this: docs.oracle.com/cd/E17952_01/mysql-5.5-en/…
    – Line
    Apr 20, 2020 at 10:13

4 Answers 4

53

All kinds of outer and normal joins are in the same precedence class and operators take effect left-to-right at a given nesting level of the query. You can put the join expression on the right side in parentheses to cause it to take effect first. Remember that you will have to move the ON clauses around so that they stay with their joins—the join in parentheses takes its ON clause with it into the parentheses, so it now comes textually before the other ON clause which will be after the parentheses in the outer join statement.

(PostgreSQL example)

In

SELECT * FROM a LEFT JOIN b ON (a.id = b.id) JOIN c ON (b.ref = c.id);

the a-b join takes effect first, but we can force the b-c join to take effect first by putting it in parentheses, which looks like:

SELECT * FROM a LEFT JOIN (b JOIN c ON (b.ref = c.id)) ON (a.id = b.id);

Often you can express the same thing without extra parentheses by moving the joins around and changing the direction of the outer joins, e.g.

SELECT * FROM b JOIN c ON (b.ref = c.id) RIGHT JOIN a ON (a.id = b.id);
8
  • 4
    A clarification: all join operators have the same precedence and all have left-to-right associativity. This is the way subtraction (-) and division (/) operators work in virtually all programming languages. Changing the order of operands has no effect on its "precedence" (an aspect of the SQL grammar and not the operand in any case). Doing this makes use of the left-to-right associativity of the join in order to achieve a desired semantics of the composite joins. But it changes neither the precedence nor the associativity of anything in the expression - only its context of interpretation. Mar 24, 2016 at 19:37
  • Fair enough. What's a second word that conveys the effect of one operator preceding the effect of another operator, but not precedence because that's already taken?
    – rakslice
    Mar 26, 2016 at 20:07
  • Rephrased. Also, as much as I hate to step on someone's jargon word by using it for its dictionary definition (no I don't), what really grinds my gears is something like "associativity" where the jargon word is mathematical terminology that has been appropriated by the computing world.
    – rakslice
    Mar 26, 2016 at 20:28
  • 2
    If you are looking for a less specific term than either precedence or associativity, I would suggest "binding". This usage is both less specific and more informal. The binding of operators and operands is affected both by operator precedence and operator associativity. In any event it should be realized that precedence and associativity are related but very distinct concepts. Mar 30, 2016 at 20:12
  • 4
    Re: Rephrased. I would suggest lubricating your gears to prevent grinding. There is no - repeat NO - reason to prefer obscurity and ambiguity when accuracy and clarity is so readily available. Your characterization of a well-defined, well-understood, widely-recognized, and relevant term in a technical discussion as "jargon" indicates at the very least a less-than-serious attitude toward the subject matter. Operator precedence does not deal with operand order at all - only operator associativity does that. As for that later term originating in mathematics, so does precedence. Mar 30, 2016 at 20:20
3

When you join the third table, your first query

SELECT
        *
    FROM 
        R
    JOIN    S ON (S.id = R.fks)

is like a derived table to which you're joining the third table. So if R JOIN S produces no rows, then joining P will never yield any rows (because you're trying to join to an empty table).

So, if you're looking for precedence rules then in this case it's just set by using LEFT JOIN as opposed to JOIN.

However, I may be misunderstanding your question, because if I were writing the query, I would swap S and R around. eg.

SELECT
        *
    FROM 
        S
    JOIN    R ON (S.id = R.fks)
2
  • consider I have to join 3 tables, not 2.
    – vulkanino
    Sep 23, 2010 at 16:20
  • 1
    It just works from left to right. The only way around it I can think of is by putting a whole derived table in some brackets. Sep 23, 2010 at 16:30
2

The second join is tied to S as you explicity state JOIN P ON (P.id = S.fkp) - no column from R is referenced in the join.

2
  • ok, but there's no way, in general, to give precedence to joins?
    – vulkanino
    Sep 23, 2010 at 16:04
  • I don't think that SQL works in the way you are thinking. Paul Spangle's answer describes how SQL 'thinks' about joins.
    – El Ronnoco
    Sep 23, 2010 at 16:16
-2
with a as (select 1 as test union select 2)
select * from a left join
a as b on a.test=b.test and b.test=1 inner join
a as c on b.test=c.test 
go
with a as (select 1 as test union select 2)
select * from a inner join
a as b on a.test=b.test  right join
a as c on b.test=c.test and b.test=1

Ideally, we would hope that the above two queries are the same. However, they are not - so anybody that says a right join can be replaced with a left join in all cases is wrong. Only by using the right join can we get the required result.

1
  • 2
    right joins have nothing to do with this question and no one is saying they are the same.
    – Hogan
    Jul 29, 2016 at 17:48

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