In Swift 2, I was able to create queue with the following code:

let concurrentQueue = dispatch_queue_create("com.swift3.imageQueue", DISPATCH_QUEUE_CONCURRENT)

But this doesn't compile in Swift 3.

What is the preferred way to write this in Swift 3?

14 Answers 14

up vote 969 down vote accepted

Creating a concurrent queue

let concurrentQueue = DispatchQueue(label: "queuename", attributes: .concurrent)
concurrentQueue.sync {

}  

Create a serial queue

let serialQueue = DispatchQueue(label: "queuename")
serialQueue.sync { 

}

Get main queue asynchronously

DispatchQueue.main.async {

}

Get main queue synchronously

DispatchQueue.main.sync {

}

To get one of the background thread

DispatchQueue.global(qos: .background).async {

}

Xcode 8.2 beta 2:

To get one of the background thread

DispatchQueue.global(qos: .default).async {

}

DispatchQueue.global().async {
    // qos' default value is ´DispatchQoS.QoSClass.default`
}

If you want to learn about using these queues .See this answer

  • 3
    You can actually omit attributes: .serial when creating a serial queue: let serialQueue = DispatchQueue(label: "queuename"). – kean Jul 26 '16 at 5:50
  • 12
    In Xcode 8 beta 4 there is no .serial option so you have to create serial queue by omitting the .concurrent in attributes. – Oleg Sherman Aug 2 '16 at 8:15
  • i dont have beta 4 can you please edit as necessary – Anish 웃 Aug 2 '16 at 8:21
  • 1
    from the OP's code, why does apple focus on using "com.swift3.imageQueue". I see that that the label has 3 parts. Why is that? what does each part stand for? I don't get the formatting – Honey Jan 4 '17 at 5:02
  • 1
    very helpful thanx man ! – tania_S Dec 13 '17 at 10:33

Compiles under Swift 3. This example contains most of the syntax that we need.

QoS - new quality of service syntax

weak self - to disrupt retain cycles

if self is not available, do nothing

async global background queue - for network query

async main queue - for touching the UI.

Of course, you need to add some error checking to this...

DispatchQueue.global(qos: .background).async { [weak self] () -> Void in

    guard let strongSelf = self else { return }

    strongSelf.flickrPhoto.loadLargeImage { loadedFlickrPhoto, error in

        if error != nil {
            print("error:\(error)")
        } else {
            DispatchQueue.main.async { () -> Void in
                activityIndicator.removeFromSuperview()
                strongSelf.imageView.image = strongSelf.flickrPhoto.largeImage
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 6
    When coding in Swift 3, get accustomed to condensing and deleting 30% of your previous code:-) – t1ser Aug 22 '16 at 14:50
  • Thank you for [weak self] example! – Mihael Isaev Sep 6 '16 at 17:36
  • 1
    It's better to guard that self is not nil at the top, so that none of the code is executed if it's nil, e.g., guard strongSelf = self else { return }. – Scott Gardner Nov 11 '16 at 13:52
  • @t1 Could you tell me where I can find the documentation for GCD written with code in Swift 3? I have only found the one written in Objective C. Someone here was pointing me to a video from WWDC, but I want to read the official documentation with examples in Swift 3 and there is no way to find it. – bibscy Dec 8 '16 at 11:58

Compiled in XCode 8, Swift 3 https://github.com/rpthomas/Jedisware

 @IBAction func tap(_ sender: AnyObject) {

    let thisEmail = "emailaddress.com"
    let thisPassword = "myPassword" 

    DispatchQueue.global(qos: .background).async {

        // Validate user input

        let result = self.validate(thisEmail, password: thisPassword)

        // Go back to the main thread to update the UI
        DispatchQueue.main.async {
            if !result
            {
                self.displayFailureAlert()
            }

        }
    }

}

I did this and this is especially important if you want to refresh your UI to show new data without user noticing like in UITableView or UIPickerView.

    DispatchQueue.main.async
 {
   /*Write your thread code here*/
 }
   let concurrentQueue = dispatch_queue_create("com.swift3.imageQueue", DISPATCH_QUEUE_CONCURRENT) //Swift 2 version

   let concurrentQueue = DispatchQueue(label:"com.swift3.imageQueue", attributes: .concurrent) //Swift 3 version

I re-worked your code in Xcode 8, Swift 3 and the changes are marked in contrast to your Swift 2 version.

  • This looks cleaner than what I wrote. Thanks. – gosborne3 Mar 10 '17 at 16:08

Since the OP question has already been answered above I just want to add some speed considerations:

It makes a lot of difference what priority class you assign to your async function in DispatchQueue.global.

I don't recommend running tasks with the .background thread priority especially on the iPhone X where the task seems to be allocated on the low power cores.

Here is some real data from a computationally intensive function that reads from an XML file (with buffering) and performs data interpolation:

Device name / .background / .utility / .default / .userInitiated / .userInteractive

  1. iPhone X: 18.7s / 6.3s / 1.8s / 1.8s / 1.8s
  2. iPhone 7: 4.6s / 3.1s / 3.0s / 2.8s / 2.6s
  3. iPhone 5s: 7.3s / 6.1s / 4.0s / 4.0s / 3.8s

Note that the data set is not the same for all devices. It's the biggest on the iPhone X and the smallest on the iPhone 5s.

  • 1
    Great info. Helped me – Morgz Jul 24 at 8:12
 DispatchQueue.main.async {
          self.collectionView?.reloadData() // Depends if you were populating a collection view or table view
    }


OperationQueue.main.addOperation {
    self.lblGenre.text = self.movGenre
}

//use Operation Queue if you need to populate the objects(labels, imageview, textview) on your viewcontroller

Swift 3

you want call some closure in swift code then you want to change in storyboard ya any type off change belong to view your application will crash

but you want to use dispatch method your application will not crash

async method

DispatchQueue.main.async 
{
 //Write code here                                   

}

sync method

DispatchQueue.main.sync 
{
     //Write code here                                  

}
  • I want to use async method in service calling time my code is DispatchQueue.main.async { let objstory1 = self.storyboard?.instantiateViewController(withIdentifier: "HomeViewController") as! HomeViewController _ = self.navigationController?.pushViewController(objstory1, animated: false) } – Rob-4608 May 18 '17 at 9:46
  • Never use DispatchQueue.main.sync – trickster77777 Oct 12 '17 at 13:05
DispatchQueue.main.async(execute: {

// write code

})

Serial Queue :

let serial = DispatchQueue(label: "Queuename")

serial.sync { 

 //Code Here

}

Concurrent queue :

 let concurrent = DispatchQueue(label: "Queuename", attributes: .concurrent)

concurrent.sync {

 //Code Here
}
  • This doesn't create a dispatch queue, it just puts you on the main queue after one tick through the run loop. – buildsucceeded May 11 '17 at 11:51

For Swift 3

   DispatchQueue.main.async {
        // Write your code here
    }
  • 1
    @Moritz I don't understand why do these kind of answers still get upvotes... – Orkhan Alikhanov Oct 30 '17 at 19:44
  • @Moritz I couldn't agree more, unfortunately. – Orkhan Alikhanov Oct 31 '17 at 3:33
 let newQueue = DispatchQueue(label: "newname")
 newQueue.sync { 

 // your code

 }
  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – kelin Oct 14 '17 at 8:58

it is now simply:

let serialQueue = DispatchQueue(label: "my serial queue")

the default is serial, to get concurrent, you use the optional attributes argument .concurrent

  • 11
    This does not add anything new to the thread. – vikingosegundo Sep 10 '16 at 0:44
  • 1
    Why so many vote-down? – Dawn Song Nov 24 '16 at 6:34
  • You'd better update your answer by adding seiralQueue.async {}. @tylemol – Dawn Song Nov 24 '16 at 6:35

You can create dispatch queue using this code in swift 3.0

DispatchQueue.main.async
 {
   /*Write your code here*/
 }

   /* or */

let delayTime = DispatchTime.now() + Double(Int64(0.5 * Double(NSEC_PER_SEC))) / Double(NSEC_PER_SEC)                   
DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: delayTime)
{
  /*Write your code here*/
}
  • 1
    Sorry, that's not creating a dispatch queue, that's accessing the main queue after one tick through the run loop. – buildsucceeded May 11 '17 at 11:50
DispatchQueue.main.async(execute: {
   // code
})
  • Thank you for this code snippet, which may provide some immediate help. A proper explanation would greatly improve its educational value by showing why this is a good solution to the problem, and would make it more useful to future readers with similar, but not identical, questions. Please edit your answer to add explanation, and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. – Toby Speight May 16 '17 at 12:33

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