3

I have a counter (training_queue) shared among many instances of a class. The class inherits threading.Thread, so it implements a run() method. When I call start(), I expect each thread to increment this counter, so when it reaches a limit no more threads are started. However, none of the threads modifies the variable. Here's the code:

class Engine(threading.Thread):

training_mutex = threading.Semaphore(MAX_TRAIN)
training_queue = 0
analysis_mutex = threading.Semaphore(MAX_ANALYSIS)
analysis_queue = 0
variable_mutex = threading.Lock()


def __init__(self, config):
    threading.Thread.__init__(self)
    self.config = config
    self.deepnet = None
    # prevents engine from doing analysis while training
    self.analyze_lock = threading.Lock()

def run(self):
    with self.variable_mutex:
        self.training_queue += 1
    print self.training_queue
    with self.training_mutex:
        with self.analyze_lock:
            self.deepnet = self.loadLSTM3Model()

I protect the training_queue with a Lock, so it should be thread-safe. How ever, if I print its value its always 1. How does threading affect variable scope in this case?

11

Your understanding of how state is shared between threads is correct. However, you are using instance attribute "training_queue" instead of class attribute "training_queue".

That is, you always set training_queue to 1 for each new object.

For example:

import threading

class Engine(threading.Thread):
    training_queue = 0
    print_lock = threading.Lock()

    def __init__(self, config):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)

    def run(self):
        with Engine.print_lock:
            self.training_queue += 1
            print self.training_queue

Engine('a').start()
Engine('b').start()
Engine('c').start()
Engine('d').start()
Engine('e').start()

Will return:

1
1
1
1
1

But:

import threading

class Engine(threading.Thread):
    training_queue = 0
    print_lock = threading.Lock()

    def __init__(self, config):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)

    def run(self):
        with Engine.print_lock:
            Engine.training_queue += 1
            print self.training_queue

Engine('a').start()
Engine('b').start()
Engine('c').start()
Engine('d').start()
Engine('e').start()

Returns:

1
2
3
4
5

Note self.training_queue vs Engine.training_queue

btw. I think += in python should be atomic so I wouldn't bother with the lock. However, not the usage of lock for printing to stdout in the example above.

  • That was the error, thanks. However, i will keep the locks for the counter; += does not seem to be atomic: [effbot.org/pyfaq/…. One thing: if I was using instance variables for all my Semaphores, how did they get to work? (i achieved the concurrency I wanted with them) – ledermauss Jun 14 '16 at 9:57

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