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Given a dictionary of format strings, I want to do cascading/recursive string interpolation.

FOLDERS = dict(home="/home/user",
               workspace="{home}/workspace",
               app_project="{workspace}/{app_name}",
               app_name="my_app")

I started with this implementation:

def interpolate(attrs):
    remain = [k for k, v in attrs.items() if "{" in v]
    while remain:
        for k in remain:
            attrs[k] = attrs[k].format(**attrs)
        remain = [k for k in remain if "{" in attrs[k]]

The interpolate() function first select the format strings. Then, it substitute the strings until no more format strings remain.

When I call this function with the following Python dictionary, I get:

>>> import pprint
>>> pprint.pprint(FOLDERS)
{'app_name': 'my_app',
 'app_project': '/home/user/workspace/my_app',
 'home': '/home/user',
 'workspace': '/home/user/workspace'}

The result is OK but this implementation doesn't detect reference cycles.

For instance, the following call results in Infinite loop!

>>> interpolate({'home': '{home}'})

Could anyone give me a better implementation?

EDIT: solution

I think Leon's solution is good and simple, the one of Serge Bellesta too.

I'll implement it that way:

def interpolate(attrs):
    remain = [k for k, v in attrs.items() if "{" in v]
    while remain:
        for k in remain:
            attrs[k] = attrs[k].format(**attrs)
            fmt = '{' + k + '}'
            if fmt in attrs[k]: # check for reference cycles
                raise ValueError("Reference cycle found for '{k}'!".format(k=k))
        remain = [k for k in remain if "{" in attrs[k]]
3
  • 2
    "Could anyone give me a better implementation?" - that is not what SO is for. What is the actual problem you're trying to solve - will you actually get any inputs with reference cycles?
    – jonrsharpe
    Jun 14 '16 at 12:23
  • "Could anyone give me a better implementation?" - Does it only have to produce the exact same results for the given input?
    – Peter Wood
    Jun 14 '16 at 12:42
  • If fact, I'm searching a generic solution. The exemples are only for illustration. Yes, we can have cycles if the user which defines the folders makes an error in — typically — a configuration files: the interpolate() function should found it. Jun 14 '16 at 20:34
1

You can check for such reference cycles in the for loop easily. Just check if the key is referenced in the matching value within the for loop:

def interpolate(attrs):
    remain = [k for k, v in attrs.items() if "{" in v]
    while remain:
        for k in remain:
            attrs[k] = attrs[k].format(**attrs)
            if '{%s}' % k in attrs[k]: # check for reference cycles
                raise ValueError("Input contains at least one reference cycle!")
        remain = [k for k in remain if "{" in attrs[k]]

Now, if there is a reference cycle, an error is raised. This will detect reference cycles of any length, as it is substituted until one is found or all substitutions are complete.

0

If your only problem is to detect cyclic references in order to avoid infinite loops, you can stop as soon as one interpolation returns its input:

def interpolate(attrs):
    remain = [k for k, v in attrs.items() if "{" in v]
    while remain:
        for k in remain:
            attrs[k] = attrs[k].format(**attrs)
        temp = [k for k in remain if "{" in attrs[k]]
        if temp == remain:
            # cyclic reference detected
            ...
        remain = temp

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