36

Since Java 8 interfaces could have default methods. I know how to invoke the method explicitly from the implementing method, i.e. (see Explicitly calling a default method in Java)

But how do I explicitly invoke the default method using reflection for example on a proxy?

Example:

interface ExampleMixin {

  String getText();

  default void printInfo(){
    System.out.println(getText());
  }
}

class Example {

  public static void main(String... args) throws Exception {

    Object target = new Object();

    Map<String, BiFunction<Object, Object[], Object>> behavior = new HashMap<>();

    ExampleMixin dynamic =
            (ExampleMixin) Proxy.newProxyInstance(Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader(),new Class[]{ExampleMixin.class}, (Object proxy, Method method, Object[] arguments) -> {

                //custom mixin behavior
                if(behavior.containsKey(method.getName())) {
                    return behavior.get(method.getName()).apply(target, arguments);
                //default mixin behavior
                } else if (method.isDefault()) {
                    //this block throws java.lang.IllegalAccessException: no private access for invokespecial
                    return MethodHandles.lookup()
                                        .in(method.getDeclaringClass())
                                        .unreflectSpecial(method, method.getDeclaringClass())
                                        .bindTo(target)
                                        .invokeWithArguments();
                //no mixin behavior
                } else if (ExampleMixin.class == method.getDeclaringClass()) {
                    throw new UnsupportedOperationException(method.getName() + " is not supported");
                //base class behavior
                } else{
                    return method.invoke(target, arguments);
                }
            });

    //define behavior for abstract method getText()
    behavior.put("getText", (o, a) -> o.toString() + " myText");

    System.out.println(dynamic.getClass());
    System.out.println(dynamic.toString());
    System.out.println(dynamic.getText());

    //print info should by default implementation
    dynamic.printInfo();
  }
}

Edit: I know a similar question has been asked in How do I invoke Java 8 default methods refletively, but this has not solved my problem for two reasons:

  • the problem described in that question aimed on how to invoked it via reflection in general - so no distinction between default and overriden method was made - and this is simple, you only need an instance.
  • one of the answers - using method handles - does only work with nasty hack (imho) like changing access modifiers to fields of the lookup class, which is the same category of "solutions" like this: Change private static final field using Java reflection: it's good to know it's possible, but I wouldn't use it in production - I'm looking for an "official" way to do it.

The IllegalAccessException is thrown in unreflectSpecial

Caused by: java.lang.IllegalAccessException: no private access for invokespecial: interface example.ExampleMixin, from example.ExampleMixin/package
at java.lang.invoke.MemberName.makeAccessException(MemberName.java:852)
at java.lang.invoke.MethodHandles$Lookup.checkSpecialCaller(MethodHandles.java:1568)
at java.lang.invoke.MethodHandles$Lookup.unreflectSpecial(MethodHandles.java:1227)
at example.Example.lambda$main$0(Example.java:30)
at example.Example$$Lambda$1/1342443276.invoke(Unknown Source)
9
  • 1
    Isn't it a duplicate of this stackoverflow.com/questions/22614746/… Jun 14, 2016 at 13:00
  • 2
    "I'm looking for an "official" way to do it" I may be mistaken but I am afraid that officially you are not supposed to be able to invoke method from supertype if your subtype overridden it. Lets say that your supertype have acceptSquare method which can accept any Squares, but your subtype is specializing in handling only red squares so it overriden it accordingly to add test for color (after that it invokes super.addSquare). So allowing someone to invoke from outside implementation from supertype (even via reflection) of such method could be big security hole.
    – Pshemo
    Jun 14, 2016 at 13:58
  • How about mixins - adding functionality to an existing class using a dynamic proxy? i.e. I have an instance and want to add additional functionality by "adding" interfaces with default methods to the instance at runtime. There must be a way Jun 14, 2016 at 14:04
  • I updated the example accordingly, wanted to have it as simple as possible in the first place, but hopefully my intent is getting clearer now Jun 14, 2016 at 14:21
  • The invocation target for a default method must be an instance of that interface. In your example code, it’s an Object—how is that supposed to work?
    – Holger
    Jun 14, 2016 at 14:29

8 Answers 8

16

I've been troubled by similar issues as well when using MethodHandle.Lookup in JDK 8 - 10, which behave differently. I've blogged about the correct solution here in detail.

This approach works in Java 8

In Java 8, the ideal approach uses a hack that accesses a package-private constructor from Lookup:

import java.lang.invoke.MethodHandles.Lookup;
import java.lang.reflect.Constructor;
import java.lang.reflect.Proxy;

interface Duck {
    default void quack() {
        System.out.println("Quack");
    }
}

public class ProxyDemo {
    public static void main(String[] a) {
        Duck duck = (Duck) Proxy.newProxyInstance(
            Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader(),
            new Class[] { Duck.class },
            (proxy, method, args) -> {
                Constructor<Lookup> constructor = Lookup.class
                    .getDeclaredConstructor(Class.class);
                constructor.setAccessible(true);
                constructor.newInstance(Duck.class)
                    .in(Duck.class)
                    .unreflectSpecial(method, Duck.class)
                    .bindTo(proxy)
                    .invokeWithArguments(args);
                return null;
            }
        );

        duck.quack();
    }
}

This is the only approach that works with both private-accessible and private-inaccessible interfaces. However, the above approach does illegal reflective access to JDK internals, which will no longer work in a future JDK version, or if --illegal-access=deny is specified on the JVM.

This approach works on Java 9 and 10, but not 8

import java.lang.invoke.MethodHandles;
import java.lang.invoke.MethodType;
import java.lang.reflect.Proxy;

interface Duck {
    default void quack() {
        System.out.println("Quack");
    }
}

public class ProxyDemo {
    public static void main(String[] a) {
        Duck duck = (Duck) Proxy.newProxyInstance(
            Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader(),
            new Class[] { Duck.class },
            (proxy, method, args) -> {
                MethodHandles.lookup()
                    .findSpecial( 
                         Duck.class, 
                         "quack",  
                         MethodType.methodType(void.class, new Class[0]),  
                         Duck.class)
                    .bindTo(proxy)
                    .invokeWithArguments(args);
                return null;
            }
        );

        duck.quack();
    }
}

Solution

Simply implement both of the above solutions and check if your code is running on JDK 8 or on a later JDK and you'll be fine. Until you're not :)

5
  • Unfortunately neither method works for Android since Android blocks reflection access to the Java 8 method. :(
    – Mygod
    May 30, 2020 at 22:06
  • It seems like for Android 8+, you need to call the constructor with the integer parameter set to (ALL_MODES) as the other API is greylisted and unusable if you target API 28+.
    – Mygod
    May 30, 2020 at 23:06
  • @Mygod: This was mostly a JDK question and answer. Feel free to provide an Android specific answer, I'm sure it will be useful for others...
    – Lukas Eder
    Jun 1, 2020 at 16:15
  • To be clear, the approach outlined for Java 8 will only fail on Java 9, 10, 11 if the JVM is started with --illegal-access=deny (which, by default, it is not). Otherwise, this solution will print a warning message on the console, but it will still work.
    – raner
    Jul 31, 2021 at 19:53
  • You seemed to miss out that the context of the actual question is the Java Platform Module System (JPMS). In this context none of your suggested solutions work as you always get an IllegalAccessException. However, if you can see the Interface from a module, you should be able to invoke default methods (esp. for dynamic proxies) as otherwise the basic concepts of Java are flawed. Seems that users need to upgrade to Java 16/17 and use InvocationHandler.invokeDefault as suggested by @John
    – Jörg
    Jan 4, 2022 at 19:37
10

If you use a concrete impl class as lookupClass and caller for the invokeSpecial it should correctly invoke the default implementation of the interface (no hack for private access needed):

Example target = new Example();
...

Class targetClass = target.getClass();
return MethodHandles.lookup()
                    .in(targetClass)
                    .unreflectSpecial(method, targetClass)
                    .bindTo(target)
                    .invokeWithArguments();

This of course only works if you have a reference to a concrete object implementing the interface.

Edit: this solution will only work if the class in question (Example in the code above), is private accessible from the caller code, e.g. an anonymous inner class.

The current implementation of the MethodHandles/Lookup class will not allow to call invokeSpecial on any class that is not private accessible from the current caller class. There are various work-arounds available, but all of them require the use of reflection to make constructors/methods accessible, which will probably fail in case a SecurityManager is installed.

11
  • 1
    hm, this also works with anonymous classes ... but given, I don't know the interfaces before (i.e. because it's a parameter), could I creates instances of anonymous classes dynamically? (proxy seems not to work, byte code generation is not an option either) Jun 14, 2016 at 15:43
  • What is ex in this example? It must be an instance of Example here, so why not just use the target instance? Besides that, it has the same restriction as using ExampleMixin directly; it only works, if the specified class has an inner class relationship with the surrounding code (the code which invokes lookup()).
    – Holger
    Jun 14, 2016 at 16:33
  • This was a mistake, ex should indeed be replaced by target. Jun 14, 2016 at 16:35
  • 1
    @Gerald Mücke: there is no point in trying to generate an implementation, regardless of which method you use. When you invoke MethodHandles.lookup(), you get a context allowing private access to yourself. As soon as you invoke in(someOtherClass) on it with a class which has no inner class relationship to yourself, which includes all kinds of generated classes, you’ll lose the private access property, which is required for unreflectSpecial.
    – Holger
    Jun 14, 2016 at 16:42
  • 1
    In Java 16+, this no longer works due to JEP 396.
    – kriegaex
    Dec 28, 2021 at 1:17
9

In Java 16 (from the documentation, which also has more complex examples):

Object proxy = Proxy.newProxyInstance(loader, new Class[] { A.class },
        (o, m, params) -> {
            if (m.isDefault()) {
                // if it's a default method, invoke it
                return InvocationHandler.invokeDefault(o, m, params);
            }
        });
}
1
2

If all you have is an interface, and all you have access to is a class object is an interface that extends your base interface, and you want to call the default method without a real instance of a class that implements the interface, you can:

Object target = Proxy.newProxyInstance(classLoader,
      new Class[]{exampleInterface}, (Object p, Method m, Object[] a) -> null);

Create an instance of the interface, and then construct the MethodHandles.Lookup using reflection:

Constructor<MethodHandles.Lookup> lookupConstructor = 
    MethodHandles.Lookup.class.getDeclaredConstructor(Class.class, Integer.TYPE);
if (!lookupConstructor.isAccessible()) {
    lookupConstructor.setAccessible(true);
}

And then use that lookupConstructor to create a new instance of your interface that will allow private access to invokespecial. Then invoke the method on the fake proxy target you made earlier.

lookupConstructor.newInstance(exampleInterface,
        MethodHandles.Lookup.PRIVATE)
        .unreflectSpecial(method, declaringClass)
        .bindTo(target)
        .invokeWithArguments(args);
1
  • MethodHandles.Lookup gives "illegal reflective access", same as reported above. Jan 14, 2018 at 14:12
1

Use:

Object result = MethodHandles.lookup()
    .in(method.getDeclaringClass())
    .unreflectSpecial(method, method.getDeclaringClass())
    .bindTo(target)
    .invokeWithArguments();
1
  • 6
    I tried that, gave me Caused by: java.lang.IllegalAccessException: no private access for invokespecial: interface example.IExample, from example.IExample/package Jun 14, 2016 at 12:52
1

We can see how spring process default method.

  1. try invoke public method MethodHandles.privateLookupIn(Class,Lookup) first. This should success on jdk9+.
  2. try create a Lookup with package private constructor MethodHandles.Lookup(Class).
  3. fallback to MethodHandles.lookup().findSpecial(...)

https://github.com/spring-projects/spring-data-commons/blob/2.1.8.RELEASE/src/main/java/org/springframework/data/projection/DefaultMethodInvokingMethodInterceptor.java

1
  • spring does not support Java modules at all. Therefore the error IllegalAccessException: no private access for invokespecial: interface example.ExampleMixin, from example.ExampleMixin/package will not go away when springs "solution" is used.
    – Jörg
    Jan 7, 2022 at 18:40
1

T. Neidhart answer almost worked but I got the java.lang.IllegalAccessException: no private access for invokespecial

Changing to use MethodHandles.privateLookup() solved it

return MethodHandles.privateLookupIn(clazz,MethodHandles.lookup())
                        .in(clazz)
                        .unreflectSpecial(method, clazz)
                        .bindTo(proxy)
                        .invokeWithArguments(args);

Here's a full example, the idea is that a user that extends a provided IMap can access nested nested map's with he's custom interface

interface IMap {
    Object get(String key);

    default <T> T getAsAny(String key){
        return (T)get(key);
    }


    default <T extends IMap> T getNestedAs(String key, Class<T> clazz) {
        Map<String,Object> nested = getAsAny(key);
        return (T)Proxy.newProxyInstance(this.getClass().getClassLoader(), new Class[]{clazz},  (proxy, method, args) -> {
                    if (method.getName().equals("get")){
                        return nested.get(args[0]);
                    }
                    return MethodHandles.privateLookupIn(clazz, MethodHandles.lookup())
                            .in(clazz)
                            .unreflectSpecial(method, clazz)
                            .bindTo(proxy)
                            .invokeWithArguments(args);
                }
        );
    }
}

interface IMyMap extends IMap{

    default Integer getAsInt(String key){
        return getAsAny(key);
    }
    default IMyMap getNested(String key){
        return getNestedAs(key,IMyMap.class);
    }
}

@Test
public void test(){
    var data =Map.of("strKey","strValue", "nstKey", Map.of("intKey",42));
    IMyMap base = data::get;

    IMyMap myMap = base.getNested("nstKey");
    System.out.println( myMap.getAsInt("intKey"));
}
1
  • 1
    Requires Java 9 it seems.
    – Mygod
    May 30, 2020 at 22:22
0

Lukas' answer works on Android 8+ (earlier releases do not have default methods) but relies on a private API that was blocked in later Android releases. Fortunately, the alternative constructor also works and is in grey list (unsupported) for now. The example (written in Kotlin) can be seen here.

@get:RequiresApi(26)
private val newLookup by lazy @TargetApi(26) {
    MethodHandles.Lookup::class.java.getDeclaredConstructor(Class::class.java, Int::class.java).apply {
        isAccessible = true
    }
}

@RequiresApi(26)
fun InvocationHandler.invokeDefault(proxy: Any, method: Method, vararg args: Any?) =
    newLookup.newInstance(method.declaringClass, 0xf)   // ALL_MODES
        .unreflectSpecial(method, method.declaringClass)
        .bindTo(proxy)
        .invokeWithArguments(*args)

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