10

I want to switch through many possible cases for x and there's one case (here x == 0) where I want to check the result of some additional code to determine what to do next. One possibility is to return early from the match.

I'd use break to do this early-returning in C, but this isn't allowed in Rust. return returns from the parent function (in this case main()) and not from the match only (i.e. the println! at the end isn't run!).

I could just negate the sub-condition (here y == 0) and indent the whole lot of following code -- but I find this ugly and unreadable.

Putting the sub-condition into a match-guard is no option for me since it's simply too big.

Is this possible in Rust or is there a better alternative (except creating another subfunction or other work-arounds)?

Minimal example:

fn main() {
    let x = 1;

    match x {
        1 => {
            let y = 0;
            /*
             * do ev1l stuff to y that I don't want to put into the match-guard
             * as it's simply too much.
             */

            /* break early ... */
            if y == 0 {break;} // > error: `break` outside of loop [E0268]

            assert!(y != 0, "y was 0!");
            /* do other stuff in here. */
        }
        _ => {}
    }

    println!("done matching");
}

I found Mixing matching, mutation, and moves in Rust — is it wrong?

match embraces both imperative and functional styles of programming: you can continue using break statements, assignments, et cetera, rather than being forced to adopt an expression-oriented mindset.

I'm still learning Rust and coming from C so bear with me ;-)

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  • 4
    My thought process while reading the question: Create an else block. Oh, OP disallowed that. Maybe a match guard? Oh, OP disallowed that. Make a function? Oh, OP disallowed that. – Shepmaster Jun 14 '16 at 14:44
  • 1
    My question is specifically whether there's such an equivalent to break since imho it's the most "clean" way to solve this problem. Ofcourse if it's not possible I will refrain to one of the other options but imho these are "overkill" for what I want to do. – ljrk Jun 14 '16 at 14:47
  • 5
    There's no way to do this under your restrictions. – WiSaGaN Jun 14 '16 at 14:48
  • 1
    these are "overkill" for what I want to do. I don't think so, using functions to simplify match guards is a great way to make code more readable (a helpful name for the function being a prerequisite of course). Remember, other people need to read your code after you write it. Other people include future you that forgot what's going on here. – oli_obk Jun 14 '16 at 14:51
  • 1
    @larkey: shortening a long but simple piece of code into a (local) function (maybe even a function-local-function) is definitely a way to increase readability. Using a closure can even get you around the issue of too many arguments – oli_obk Jun 14 '16 at 14:56
6

You can wrap the match into a loop that only runs once and break out of the loop

fn main() {
    let x = 1;

    loop { match x {
        1 => {
            let y = 0;
            /*
             * do ev1l stuff to y that I don't want to put into the match-guard
             * as it's simply too much.
             */

            /* break early ... */
            if y == 0 { break; }

            assert!(y != 0, "y was 0!");
            /* do other stuff in here. */
        }
        _ => {}
    } break; }

    println!("done matching");
}
4
  • 7
    That's an interesting approach but I think rather obfuscates the idea more than it should and is not exactly an answer to my question. Have an upvote but I cannot accept it ;) – ljrk Jun 14 '16 at 15:10
  • 1
    why doesn't it answer your question? it lets you break out of the match right? im asking because im porting a big C 1000+ line switch statement and this is pretty much how im dealing with breaking out of the middle of a match – don bright Apr 14 '20 at 1:53
  • 1
    @donbright This solution works, but I think it's misleading code. If I came across it in the wild, I would have first assumed that the match is executed multiple times, when this is not the case. It would take me quite a while to figure this out, after which I would almost definitely try to refactor the loop statement out - assuming it to be a relic left by a previous fix. – otoomey Mar 28 at 23:33
  • i get it now, thank you Camp bell. if i wasnt porting C i would never use this trick... i'd just rewrite it to make more sense in the first place. – don bright Apr 4 at 3:44
6

You could create a macro like

macro_rules! block {
    ($xs:block) => {
        loop { let _ = $xs; break; }
    };
}

and do

match x {
    1 => block!({
        ...
        if y == 0 { break; }
        ...
    })
    _ => {}
}

It's not an amazing solution, but it is semantically meaningful.

5

Something else you could do is make a "self-executing" closure and use a return statement inside. I don't know whether there are any weird performance characteristics of this but syntactically it's pretty clean.

fn main() {
    let x = 1;

    // This closure is just used to catch the "return" statement.
    (|| {
        match x {
            1 => {
                let y = 0;
                /*
                 * do ev1l stuff to y that I don't want to put into the match-guard
                 * as it's simply too much.
                 */

                /* break early ... */
                if y == 0 { return; } // Ok!

                assert!(y != 0, "y was 0!");
                /* do other stuff in here. */
            }
            _ => {}
        }
    })();

    println!("done matching");
}

Here's a playground link showing it working.

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    any weird performance characteristics — there should not be as I expect this to be covered by Rust's "zero-cost abstractions". – Shepmaster Apr 18 '18 at 21:22

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