0

I'm trying to select a range of dom elements, from element until element. That's achievable in JQuery like this: (Source)

$('#id').nextUntil('#id2').andSelf().add('#id2')

I'm trying to achieve that using JavaScript ONLY.

Here's what I tried, but I get a infinite loop:

function prevRange(element, prevTill) {
    var result = [];

    while (element !== prevTill)
        result.push(element);
    return result;
}

JSFiddle

var wrapper = document.getElementById('wrapper'),
  wrapperChildren = wrapper.children;

console.log(prevRange(wrapperChildren[2], wrapperChildren[0]));

function prevRange(element, prevTill) {
  var result = [];

  /*while (element !== prevTill)
      result.push(element);*/
  return result;
}
<ul id="wrapper">
  <li class="inner">I'm #01</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #02</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #03</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #04</li>
</ul>

4
  • Hey! Are you trying to go backwards, rather than forwards in the DOM? That'll be quite a different function if so. Just clarifying before messing with this.
    – Ethan
    Jun 14 '16 at 19:56
  • @Ethan Hello! I will be going both ways. I was going to use the logic from this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/19046986/4861207 with JavaScript only, of course. Thanks!
    – Jessica
    Jun 14 '16 at 20:00
  • @Ethan So I guess, you can show me any way, and I'll use the logic for both ways.
    – Jessica
    Jun 14 '16 at 20:02
  • well I got distracted so a few others got their answers up first ;) You now have plenty of options though! :D
    – Ethan
    Jun 14 '16 at 20:21
1

Use Element.previousElementSibling:

var wrapper = document.getElementById('wrapper'),
  wrapperChildren = wrapper.children;

console.log(prevRange(wrapperChildren[2], wrapperChildren[0]));

function prevRange(element, prevTill) {
  var result = [element];

  while (element && element !== prevTill) {
    element = element.previousElementSibling;
    result.push(element);
  }

  return result;
}
<ul id="wrapper">
  <li class="inner">I'm #01</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #02</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #03</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #04</li>
</ul>

2
  • Thanks! This works! Performance-wise, how does this compare to @bloodyKnuckles?
    – Jessica
    Jun 14 '16 at 20:48
  • 1
    @Jessica I don't really have any comments on performance quite honestly. A good rule of thumb for high level languages is to just make your code manageable and readable first, then if performance is actually an issue, start to optimize at the expense of code readability. In light of that, just choose whichever method makes the most sense to you at a glance. Jun 14 '16 at 20:52
1

Your variables element and prevTill are never being changed inside your while loop. So if element and prevTill are not equal when you first enter your while loop, they never will be, and your while loop will never execute.

Plus you are not passing in the array of elements that you are trying to iterate over and get a subset of.

I would modify your function to take in the array of elements you are trying to get a subset of, and the starting and ending index for the subset that you want, then you can iterate over the array in your while loop.

var wrapper = document.getElementById('wrapper'),
  wrapperChildren = wrapper.children;

console.log(prevRange(wrapperChildren, 0, 2));

function prevRange(array, start, end) {
  var result = [];

  var curr = start;

  while (curr <= end) {
    result.push(array[curr]);
    curr++;
  }

  return result;
}
<ul id="wrapper">
  <li class="inner">I'm #01</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #02</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #03</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #04</li>
</ul>

4
  • OP doesn't need the array of elements. Just the start and end elements. You can traverse the DOM using element properties like previousElementSibling. Jun 14 '16 at 20:08
  • 1
    @PatrickRoberts the title of the post is 'Select Range of Dom Elements'. Also, look at the jQuery code that the OP posted, as well as the link to the related SO question. The OP wants the function to return an array of elements that includes the start element, end element, and everything in between. Jun 14 '16 at 20:11
  • 1
    I think you misunderstood my comment. The function does not need an array of elements as input. As OP has clearly requested, the signature of the function should accept a start and end element, not a parent element and two indices. Jun 14 '16 at 21:25
  • @PatrickRoberts yup, I did misinterpret your comment. Upvoted your answer Jun 15 '16 at 13:40
0

You aren't iterating over the elements. element will never equal prevTill because you are never changing element. What if you passed the array of the element's children, and iterated through it for the range that you wanted using a for loop? So you would pass the array of elements, the minimum index for the first child that you want, and the maximum index for the last child that you want.

0

Didn't you want to do this:

while (element !== null && element !== prevTill)
{
    result.push(element);
    element = element.previousElementSibling;
}

Updated fiddle.

0

There are a lot of answers already but I've implemented a all around solution for what I think you are trying to achieve.

function selectRange(from, to) {
   var i;
   var result = [];
   if (from > to) {
    // backwards
    i = from;

    while (i >= to) { 
        result.push(wrapperChildren[i]);
        i--;
    }
   }
   else if (from < to) {
    // forward
    i = from;

    while (i <= to) {
        result.push(wrapperChildren[i]);
        i++;
    }
   }
   else {
    // return just one element
    result.push(wrapperChildren[from]);
   }

   return result;
}
0

You have to iterate elements to avoid infinite loop. Working code can look like this:

function prevRange(element, prevTill) {
    var result = [];
    if(element === prevTill){
       result.push(element);
       return result;
    }
    var siblings = element.parentNode.children;//prevTill is expected among siblings
    var startSelection = false;
    for(var i=0,ch;ch=siblings[i];++i){//iterate siblings
    if(ch === element || ch === prevTill){//no matter which go first
       result.push(ch);
       startSelection = !startSelection;//start/stop
    }
    else if(startSelection)
       result.push(ch);
    }

    /*while (element !== prevTill) this is your code
        result.push(element);*/
    return result;
}
0

Well there are a few ways to do it... I like Nikhil's answer for going backwards, and you could do the same thing going forward with the nextSibling property.

I've personally had issues with next and previous (particularly IE and edge, YAY MS!!)

This is another alternative that's pretty simple but doesn't rely on the DOM next/prev.

var wrapper = document.getElementById('wrapper'),
    wrapperChildren = wrapper.children;

console.log(stopWhen(wrapperChildren[0],wrapperChildren[2]));

function stopWhen(start,end){
    var results = new Array()
        ,parent = start.parentElement
      ,startPos = Array.prototype.indexOf.call(parent.childNodes, start)-2
      ,endPos = Array.prototype.indexOf.call(parent.childNodes, end)-2;
      for(var i=startPos; i < endPos; i++){    
        if(parent.children[i] != null){
            results.push(parent.children[i]);
        }
      }
      return results;
}

Forked fiddle

0

Incorporating Array prototype slice and indexOf methods.

getRangeElements(
  document.getElementById('wrapper'), // parent
  document.getElementById('li1'),     // start
  document.getElementById('li3')      // end
)

function getRangeElements (parent, start, end) {
  var children = parent.children
  return [].slice.call(
    children, 
    [].indexOf.call(children, start),
    [].indexOf.call(children, end) + 1
  )
}

ChildNodes don't inherently have array methods, so using the call method to apply that functionality. Once the childNodes can be treated like array elements, then it's a matter of first getting the indexOf the child elements, then sliceing the range you're looking for.

Given:

<ul id="wrapper">
  <li class="inner" id="li1">I'm #01</li>
  <li class="inner" id="li2">I'm #02</li>
  <li class="inner" id="li3">I'm #03</li>
  <li class="inner" id="li4">I'm #04</li>
</ul>

...returns:

[li#li1.inner, li#li2.inner, li#li3.inner]

JSFiddle example

1
  • Thanks! This works! Performance-wise, how does this compare to @PatrickRoberts?
    – Jessica
    Jun 14 '16 at 20:40
0

You could create a TreeWalker that does this for you:

var wrapper = document.getElementById('wrapper');
var wrapperChildren = wrapper.children;

function getElementRange(rangeRoot, elementStart, elementEnd) {
  var result = [];
  var itr = document.createTreeWalker(
    rangeRoot,
    NodeFilter.SHOW_ELEMENT,
    null, // no filter
    false);
  itr.currentNode = elementStart;

  do {
    result.push(itr.currentNode);
  } while(itr.currentNode !== elementEnd && itr.nextSibling());

  return result;
}

console.log(getElementRange(wrapper, wrapperChildren[0], wrapperChildren[2]));
<ul id="wrapper">
  <li class="inner">I'm #01</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #02</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #03</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #04</li>
</ul>

Check out This link to MDN For more information on creating TreeWalkers

I also recommend having an understanding of the TreeWalker interface object

Hope this helps.

*Edit - Here is an example that supports bidirectional ranges:

var wrapper = document.getElementById('wrapper');
var wrapperChildren = wrapper.children;

function getElementRange(elementStart, elementEnd) {
  var result = [];
  var rootNode;
  var indexStart;
  var indexEnd;
  
  rootNode = elementStart.parentNode;
  if(rootNode !== elementEnd.parentNode){
      return console.log("Cannot getElementRange, elements are not siblings");
  }
  
  //Get direction to traverse nodes
  indexStart = Array.prototype.indexOf.call(rootNode.childNodes, elementStart);
  indexEnd = Array.prototype.indexOf.call(rootNode.childNodes, elementEnd);

  var itr = document.createTreeWalker(
    rootNode,
    NodeFilter.SHOW_ELEMENT,
    null, // no filter
    false);
  itr.currentNode = elementStart;
  var iterateMethod = indexStart < indexEnd ? 'nextSibling' : 'previousSibling';
  do {
    result.push(itr.currentNode);
  } while(itr.currentNode !== elementEnd && itr[iterateMethod]());
  
  return result;
}

console.log(getElementRange(wrapperChildren[1], wrapperChildren[3]));
console.log(getElementRange(wrapperChildren[3], wrapperChildren[1]));
<ul id="wrapper">
  <li class="inner">I'm #01</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #02</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #03</li>
  <li class="inner">I'm #04</li>
</ul>

1
  • @Jessica, I am editing this answer to support bidirectional ranges. Jun 14 '16 at 21:42

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