1

I am trying to make a copy of all .txt files in a folder but renamed so that they are .html files.

for f in my-txt-folder/*.txt
do
    a="$(echo $f | sed s/.txt/.html/)"
    cp "$f" "$a"
done

This is my code so far, however when I run it I get the error

my.html-folder/file.txt: No such file or directory.

I know I'm getting this error because it renames the "-txt" in the enclosing folder, but how do I stop it doing that? I also tried having it replace "\.txt" but it still thinks the enclosing folder name is a match. How do I get it to only match ".txt" ? And before anyone asks, no I cannot just drill down into the folder and then run a script from there.

2
  • 2
    Backslash to escape the . — as in sed 's/\.txt/.html/', or sed 's/.txt$/.html/' (which avoids the backslash by demanding that the .txt ends the filename, and the glob ensures that the . will be matching a .), or … Note the use of single quotes around the pattern. If won't use them, you must use two backslashes. Also, if you need to quote the file name, you need to quote it every time: a="$(echo "$f" | sed s/.txt/.html/)" — yes, the double quotes nest as you need them to. Jun 15 '16 at 1:54
  • Also, you can play-around with regex here...
    – anishsane
    Jun 15 '16 at 4:40
5

You can use a for construct to iterate over the file names and parameter expansion while cp-ing:

for file in *.txt; do cp -i "$file" "${file%.*}".html; done

The parameter expansion pattern, ${file%.*}, gets the file portion of filename stripping off .txt from end. So for a filename, foobar.txt, we would have foobar and then .html is added to have foobar.html.

Example:

$ ls *.txt
bar.txt  foo.txt

$ for file in *.txt; do cp -i "$file" "${file%.*}".html; done

$ ls *.{txt,html}
bar.html  bar.txt  foo.html  foo.txt
1
  • The ${file%.*} syntax worked. As you can see I was already using a for loop, I just didn't have the renaming down. Thanks!
    – annedroiid
    Jun 15 '16 at 1:55
2

Match on end of line, e.g.

for f in my-txt-folder/*.txt
do
    a="$(echo $f | sed -e 's/\.txt$/.html/')"
    cp "$f" "$a"
done

Previously the "." you have matched with sed was a wildcard character, and you didn't anchor the pattern at end-of-line.

There is another solution all in bash from heemayl which was just posted; the advantage of an all-shell solution is that you don't have to learn the fine points of sed just yet.

4
  • What does the $ at the end of \.txt do?
    – annedroiid
    Jun 15 '16 at 1:56
  • The $ is an end-of-line anchor.
    – vielmetti
    Jun 15 '16 at 2:00
  • As in it will only look for the string at the end of the line?
    – annedroiid
    Jun 15 '16 at 2:02
  • Yes. ^ is the beginning-of-line marker, and $ is the end-of-line marker. So e.g. sed -e 's/^foo$/bar/' will only match and replace the word foo by itself on a line.
    – vielmetti
    Jun 15 '16 at 2:04

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