48

Is there a generator , or an easy way to generate text like this but without having to define every letter

So something like this:

.rainbow {
  background-image: -webkit-gradient( linear, left top, right top, color-stop(0, #f22), color-stop(0.15, #f2f), color-stop(0.3, #22f), color-stop(0.45, #2ff), color-stop(0.6, #2f2),color-stop(0.75, #2f2), color-stop(0.9, #ff2), color-stop(1, #f22) );
  background-image: gradient( linear, left top, right top, color-stop(0, #f22), color-stop(0.15, #f2f), color-stop(0.3, #22f), color-stop(0.45, #2ff), color-stop(0.6, #2f2),color-stop(0.75, #2f2), color-stop(0.9, #ff2), color-stop(1, #f22) );
  color:transparent;
  -webkit-background-clip: text;
  background-clip: text;
}
<span class="rainbow">Rainbow text</span>

But not with rainbow colors but generate with other colors (for example white to grey/light blue gradient etc) I can't find an easy solution for this. Any solutions?

5
  • There are many websites which offer the same like cssmatic.com – Mandeep Singh Jun 15 '16 at 9:51
  • 2
    What's the problem there? Change the gradient as you wish. If you are asking about tools/generators (which I think you are) then your question will get closed as off-topic/opinion based. – Harry Jun 15 '16 at 9:53
  • 1
    That only applies to the background not the text color itself :| – StabDev Jun 15 '16 at 9:54
  • I'm trying to get to know how to get the same effect as the rainbow text sample but with other colors @Harry not asking for a generator perse a solution on how to simply set the colors myself / how the rainbow sample works would be a great help aswell. – StabDev Jun 15 '16 at 9:54
  • I'd love to know how it works. Because the given answer uses a different a approach (which works, but I still love to know) @Harry – StabDev Jun 15 '16 at 10:12
80

I don't exactly know how the stop stuff works. But I've got a gradient text example. Maybe this will help you out!

_you can also add more colors to the gradient if you want or just select other colors from the color generator

.rainbow2 {
    background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(left, #E0F8F7, #585858, #fff); /* For Chrome and Safari */
    background-image:    -moz-linear-gradient(left, #E0F8F7, #585858, #fff); /* For old Fx (3.6 to 15) */
    background-image:     -ms-linear-gradient(left, #E0F8F7, #585858, #fff); /* For pre-releases of IE 10*/
    background-image:      -o-linear-gradient(left, #E0F8F7, #585858, #fff); /* For old Opera (11.1 to 12.0) */
    background-image:         linear-gradient(to right, #E0F8F7, #585858, #fff); /* Standard syntax; must be last */
    color:transparent;
    -webkit-background-clip: text;
    background-clip: text;
}
.rainbow {

  background-image: -webkit-gradient( linear, left top, right top, color-stop(0, #f22), color-stop(0.15, #f2f), color-stop(0.3, #22f), color-stop(0.45, #2ff), color-stop(0.6, #2f2),color-stop(0.75, #2f2), color-stop(0.9, #ff2), color-stop(1, #f22) );
  background-image: gradient( linear, left top, right top, color-stop(0, #f22), color-stop(0.15, #f2f), color-stop(0.3, #22f), color-stop(0.45, #2ff), color-stop(0.6, #2f2),color-stop(0.75, #2f2), color-stop(0.9, #ff2), color-stop(1, #f22) );
  color:transparent;
  -webkit-background-clip: text;
  background-clip: text;
}
<span class="rainbow">Rainbow text</span>
<br />
<span class="rainbow2">No rainbow text</span>

3
  • but the -webkit-background-clip: text; property is not supported on IE11, any alternative? – user2602584 Dec 29 '17 at 12:55
  • I can't seems to work it properly with text-shadow, since background-image's z-index always below the the text-shadow. Any idea? – Shiz Mar 2 '20 at 8:45
  • 1
    will it work in IE11, No. Can you update with IE11 support?. – Kanagan Mar 25 '20 at 9:35
15

The way this effect works is very simple. The element is given a background which is the gradient. It goes from one color to another depending on the colors and color-stop percentages given for it.

For example, in rainbow text sample (note that I've converted the gradient into the standard syntax):

  • The gradient starts at color #f22 at 0% (that is the left edge of the element). First color is always assumed to start at 0% even though the percentage is not mentioned explicitly.
  • Between 0% to 14.25%, the color changes from #f22 to #f2f gradually. The percenatge is set at 14.25 because there are seven color changes and we are looking for equal splits.
  • At 14.25% (of the container's size), the color will exactly be #f2f as per the gradient specified.
  • Similarly the colors change from one to another depending on the bands specified by color stop percentages. Each band should be a step of 14.25%.

So, we end up getting a gradient like in the below snippet. Now this alone would mean the background applies to the entire element and not just the text.

.rainbow {
  background-image: linear-gradient(to right, #f22, #f2f 14.25%, #22f 28.5%, #2ff 42.75%, #2f2 57%, #2f2 71.25%, #ff2 85.5%, #f22);
  color: transparent;
}
<span class="rainbow">Rainbow text</span>

Since, the gradient needs to be applied only to the text and not to the element on the whole, we need to instruct the browser to clip the background from the areas outside the text. This is done by setting background-clip: text.

(Note that the background-clip: text is an experimental property and is not supported widely.)


Now if you want the text to have a simple 3 color gradient (that is, say from red - orange - brown), we just need to change the linear-gradient specification as follows:

  • First parameter is the direction of the gradient. If the color should be red at left side and brown at the right side then use the direction as to right. If it should be red at right and brown at left then give the direction as to left.
  • Next step is to define the colors of the gradient. Since our gradient should start as red on the left side, just specify red as the first color (percentage is assumed to be 0%).
  • Now, since we have two color changes (red - orange and orange - brown), the percentages must be set as 100 / 2 for equal splits. If equal splits are not required, we can assign the percentages as we wish.
  • So at 50% the color should be orange and then the final color would be brown. The position of the final color is always assumed to be at 100%.

Thus the gradient's specification should read as follows:

background-image: linear-gradient(to right, red, orange 50%, brown).

If we form the gradients using the above mentioned method and apply them to the element, we can get the required effect.

.red-orange-brown {
  background-image: linear-gradient(to right, red, orange 50%, brown);
  color: transparent;
  -webkit-background-clip: text;
  background-clip: text;
}
.green-yellowgreen-yellow-gold {
  background-image: linear-gradient(to right, green, yellowgreen 33%, yellow 66%, gold);
  color: transparent;
  -webkit-background-clip: text;
  background-clip: text;
}
<span class="red-orange-brown">Red to Orange to Brown</span>

<br>

<span class="green-yellowgreen-yellow-gold">Green to Yellow-green to Yellow to Gold</span>

5

You can achieve that effect using a combination of CSS linear-gradient and mix-blend-mode.

HTML

<p>
    Enter your message here... 
    To be or not to be, 
    that is the question...
    maybe, I think, 
    I'm not sure
    wait, you're still reading this?
    Type a good message already!
</p>

CSS

p {
    width: 300px;
    position: relative;
}

p::after {
    content: "";
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    background: linear-gradient(45deg, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple);
    mix-blend-mode: screen;
}

What this does is add a linear gradient on the paragraph's ::after pseudo-element and make it cover the whole paragraph element. But with mix-blend-mode: screen, the gradient will only show on parts where there is text.

Here's a jsfiddle to show this at work. Just modify the linear-gradient values to achieve what you want.

4
  • This looks promising. Except for the background behind the text is also fading with it. Apart from that easy and nice solution! +1 – Angel ofDemons Jun 15 '16 at 10:08
  • @AngelofDemons oh, I was assuming that the background will just be white. mix-blend-mode blends the element with all the other elements behind it, not just the text, so if the paragraph also has a background, the rainbow colors will also blend with them. I know, it sucks :( – Arnelle Balane Jun 15 '16 at 10:13
  • It doesn't suck I love the approach its easy and usefull. I tried using it this way. – Angel ofDemons Jun 15 '16 at 10:16
  • Not supported by Edge (nor IE 10/11) and doesn't work in Chrome for me (although it works in Firefox) EDIT: it does work in chrome, if the parent p has background-color: white; – jave.web Feb 8 '20 at 23:46
4

Example of CSS Text Gradient

background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top,#E605C1 0%,#3B113B 100%);
background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top,#E605C1 0%,#3B113B 100%);
background-image: -o-linear-gradient(top,#E605C1 0%,#3B113B 100%);
background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top,#E605C1 0%,#3B113B 100%);
background-image: linear-gradient(top,#E605C1 0%,#3B113B 100%);
-webkit-background-clip: text;
-webkit-text-fill-color: transparent;
position:relative;
display:inline-block; /*required*/

Online generator textgradient.com

0
2

body{ background:#3F5261; text-align:center; font-family:Arial; } 

h1 {
  font-size:3em;
  background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, gold, white);
  background: linear-gradient(top, gold, white);
  -webkit-background-clip: text;
  -webkit-text-fill-color: transparent;

  position:relative;
  margin:0;
  z-index:1;

}

div{ display:inline-block; position:relative; }
div::before{ 
   content:attr(data-title); 
   font-size:3em;
   font-weight:bold;
   position:absolute;
   top:0; left:0;
   z-index:-1;
   color:black;
   z-index:1;
   filter:blur(5px);
} 
<div data-title='SOME TITLE'>
  <h1>SOME TITLE</h1>
</div>

1

  .gradient_text_class{
      font-size: 72px;
      background: linear-gradient(to right, #ffff00 0%, #0000FF 30%);
      background-image: linear-gradient(to right, #ffff00 0%, #0000FF 30%);
      -webkit-background-clip: text;
      -webkit-text-fill-color: transparent;
    }
<div class="gradient_text_class">Hello</div>

0
0

@import url(https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Roboto+Slab:400);

body {
  background: #222;
}

h1 {
  display: table;
  margin: 0 auto;
  font-family: "Roboto Slab";
  font-weight: 600;
  font-size: 7em;
  background: linear-gradient(330deg, #e05252 0%, #99e052 25%, #52e0e0 50%, #9952e0 75%, #e05252 100%);
  -webkit-background-clip: text;
  -webkit-text-fill-color: transparent;
  line-height: 200px;
}
<h1>beautiful</h1>

2
  • Hi and welcome to stackoverflow, and thank you for answering. While this code might answer the question, can you consider adding some explanation for what the problem was you solved, and how you solved it? This will help future readers to understand your answer better and learn from it. – Bruno Jan 31 '20 at 14:08
  • will it work in IE11, No. Can you update with IE11 support?. – Kanagan Mar 25 '20 at 9:35

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