1

I have an very strange problem about use self-defined hash function in std::unordered_map.

My key type is bigger than int64, so I use std::array to represent it. To get it hash value, I create a MyHash class:

class MyHash
{
public:
    std::size_t operator()(const std::array<char, 12>& oid) const
    {
        Convert t;
        std::memcpy(t.arr, oid.data(), 12);
        std::cout << t.a <<" "<<t.b << std::endl;
        return (std::hash<std::int32_t>()(t.a) ^ (std::hash<std::int64_t>()(t.b) << 1)) >> 1;
    }
    union Convert {
        struct {
            std::int32_t a;
            std::int64_t b;
        };
        char arr[12];
    };
};

First, test it:

std::array<char, 12> arr = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12};
MyHash o;
o(arr);
o(arr);

It's OK. It print same t.a and t.b. Now use it with std::unordered_map:

std::unordered_map<std::array<char, 12>, int, MyHash> map;
std::array<char, 12> arr = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12};
map.insert(std::make_pair(arr, 1));
auto it = map.find(arr);
if(it == map.end())
    std::cout << "error";
else
    std::cout << it->second;

Now, it will print error, the reason is the t.b in insert is different with find. And this only happen in vs release mode (or g++ O2)

  • I'd rather calculate a hash of all 12 bytes using e.g. boost::hash_range: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/cddb1ea79a18d0b1 – m.s. Jun 15 '16 at 10:46
  • First I use it but I found it is a bit slow because it will do 12 times hash. And the quality is not good due to the first 4 bytes in array are almost same value – jean Jun 15 '16 at 10:50
  • if the first 4 bytes are always the same, you could just skip them when calculating the hash (boost::hash_range(oid.begin()+4, oid.end());); did you measure the time difference? how much slower is it than your memcpy/union approach? – m.s. Jun 15 '16 at 10:52
  • memcpy is 2 times faster. Actually, the array is bson objectId: docs.mongodb.com/manual/reference/method/ObjectId boost::hash_range hardly has a global view of the data – jean Jun 16 '16 at 1:25
2

To avoid undefined behavior, packing and alignment issues, you may copy to individual integers:

#include <cstdint>
#include <cstring>
#include <array>

std::size_t array_hash(const std::array<char, 12>& array) {
    std::uint64_t u64;
    std::memcpy(&u64, array.data(), 8);
    std::uint32_t u32;
    std::memcpy(&u32, array.data() + 8, 4);
    // return (std::hash<std::uint32_t>()(u32) ^ (std::hash<std::uint64_t>()(u64) << 1)) >> 1;;
    return u64 + u32; // for simplicity
}

std::size_t uint_hash(std::uint64_t u64, std::uint32_t u32) {
    // return (std::hash<std::uint32_t>()(u32) ^ (std::hash<std::uint64_t>()(u64) << 1)) >> 1;;
    return u64 + u32; // for simplicity
}

With (g++ version 4.8.4) g++ -S --std=c++11 -O3 you will get:

_Z10array_hashRKSt5arrayIcLm24EE:
.LFB914:
        .cfi_startproc
        movl    8(%rdi), %eax
        addq    (%rdi), %rax
        ret
        .cfi_endproc

and

_Z9uint_hashmj:
.LFB915:
        .cfi_startproc
        movl    %esi, %eax
        addq    %rdi, %rax
        ret
        .cfi_endproc

... which is fairly optimal.

See also: Type Punning, Strict Aliasing, and Optimization

  • +1 for making an effort to avoid UB and linking to a warning about how volatile all this is. I'm glad that I've gotten to a point where seeing reinterpret_cast makes me flinch and I know to use memcpy if there's any uncertainty. Plus, as you've shown, often the compiler will optimise the memcpy into what you'd expect from a reinterpret_cast... but with the guaranteed defined behaviour of the former, unlike the latter. The best of both worlds! – underscore_d Jun 15 '16 at 12:04
1

Let's look at this

  union Convert {
        struct {
            std::int32_t a;
            std::int64_t b;
        };
        char arr[12];
    };

The compiler may well pack extra bytes between a and b. So the type punning through the char array will not necessarily overlay the struct part. Type punning is also borderline undefined behaviour in C++; although I think you're OK in this particular instance.

It appears that the packing arrangements for the release build differ from the debug build.

Many compilers allow you to specify the packing arrangements (#pragma pack?) but I wouldn't rely on that if I were you since it defeats the compiler's optimisation strategies and is also essentially non-standard C++.

  • Swapping the order of a and b will remove the padding between because the 64bit int has to be 8 byte aligned while the 32bit int only has to be 4 byte aligned. – Emily L. Jun 15 '16 at 10:24
  • It might not do that. Especially on a 128 bit chip. – Bathsheba Jun 15 '16 at 10:24
  • The memory layout padding should not be decide at compile time? The char array may not overlay a and b completely, but why it will change in runtime? And it only happen when use it as unordered_map hash object? – jean Jun 15 '16 at 10:35
  • 1
    @Bathsheba Sure the compiler may insert padding at will, but it only inserts padding to comply with alignment requirements. Provided that the hypothetical 128 bit chip can load a (q/d/h)word from a (q/d/h)word aligned address (I don't know of a chip that can't), then there is no reason for over alignment of fundamental types of size 2^x bytes. Thus the compiler will not add padding in the above example, even on a 128 bit chip. Providing it is not a silly chip that can only perform 128 bit aligned loads, or some other pathological case. – Emily L. Jun 15 '16 at 11:08
  • 2
    Re type punning - There's no "borderline" about it. UB is UB. unions cannot be used to for 'punning', with the sole exception of if the members are structs sharing a common initial sequence of members. – underscore_d Jun 15 '16 at 11:58
0

This is a bit of a hack but you could try it and see how it works:

struct MyHash {
    std::size_t operator()(const std::array<char, 12>& oid) const {
        auto d = reinterpret_cast<const std::uint32_t*>(oid.data());
        std::size_t prime = 31;
        std::size_t other_prime = 59;
        return d[2] + other_prime*(d[1] + prime*d[0]);
    }
};

This only works because 12 is a multiple of sizeof(uint32_t) mind you. If the size changes you'll have to adjust.

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