56

I have:

const section = cloneElement(this.props.children, {
  className: this.props.styles.section,
  ...this.props,
});

Inside this.props, I have a styles property that I don't want to pass to the cloned element.

How can I do?

0

4 Answers 4

80

You can use the object rest/spread syntax:

// We destructure our "this.props" creating a 'styles' variable and
// using the object rest syntax we put the rest of the properties available
// from "this.props" into a variable called 'otherProps' 
const { styles, ...otherProps } = this.props;
const section = cloneElement(this.props.children, {
  className: styles.section,
  // We spread our props, which excludes the 'styles'
  ...otherProps,
});

I assume that you already have support from this syntax based on your code above, but please be aware that this is a proposed syntax which is made available to you via the babel stage 1 preset. If you get syntax errors on execution you can install the preset as follows:

 npm install babel-preset-stage-1 --save-dev

And then add it to the presets section of your babel configuration. For example in your .babelrc file:

 "presets": [ "es2015", "react", "stage-1" ]

Update based on comment on question by OP.

Okay, so you say that you already have a styles variable declared before this block? We can manage this case too. You can rename your destructured arguments to avoid this.

For example:

const styles = { foo: 'bar' };

const { styles: otherStyles, ...otherProps } = this.props;
const section = cloneElement(this.props.children, {
  className: otherStyles.section,
  // We spread our props, which excludes the 'styles'
  ...otherProps,
});
3
  • 1
    I don't think this works out of the box with the react preset. It would be useful if you explained how to configure Babel to make use of this. Jun 15, 2016 at 15:15
  • This is a really creative answer, I didn't know this was possible with the spread operator Jun 15, 2016 at 19:34
  • You could also destructure directly into className like this: const { styles: { section: className }, ...otherProps } = this.props;.
    – BamaPookie
    Nov 10, 2022 at 13:21
34

You could use Object Rest Spread operator magic.

const props = { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 };
const { a, ...propsNoA } = props;
console.log(propsNoA); // => { b: 2, c: 3 }

So in your case it would be:

const { styles, ...propsNoStyles } = this.props;
const section = cloneElement(this.props.children, {
  className: this.props.styles.section
  ...this.propsNoStyles,
});
3
  • This seems to be the same answer provided by @ctrlplusb
    – Fez Vrasta
    Feb 11, 2020 at 11:27
  • @am0wa this is all ok but then the es-lint or others cry because i just wanted to ignore the first one... haven't found a good way to have it vanish and make linters happy Jul 14, 2020 at 16:29
  • 1
    @RangerReturn you could use // tslint:disable-next-line
    – am0wa
    Jul 22, 2020 at 16:33
1

I like ctrlplusb's answer, but here is an alternative using Object.assign if you don't want to add a new babel preset:

const section = cloneElement(this.props.children, {
    className: this.props.styles.section,
    ...Object.assign({}, this.props, {
        styles: undefined
    })
});
2
  • 4
    Then you have an undefined property
    – Fez Vrasta
    Jun 15, 2016 at 20:17
  • 1
    That shouldn't make a difference for your application. If you try to access a prop that was not passed to your component, the value would be undefined anyways. This is almost equivalent, provided you don't rely on the existence of a particular key supplied to your props. Jun 15, 2016 at 21:13
1

or you can do something like this...

var newProp = (this.props = {p1, p2,...list out all props except styles});
1
  • This is bad at so many levels. Dec 14, 2023 at 12:47

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