9
typealias IntMaker = (Void)->Int

func makeCounter() ->IntMaker{
    var n = 0 // Line A

    func adder()->Integer{
        n = n + 1
        return n 
    }
    return adder
}

let counter1 = makeCounter()

counter1() // returns 1
counter1() // returns 2
counter1() // returns 3

Isn't 'Line A' called each time we call counter1() ? meaning that var n = 0 should be called every time...

Why is that the counter returns different values? Shouldn't they always be returning '1' ?

2

Obviously, Line A isn't being called each time counter1 is called.

The sequence of events is:

  • makeCounter is called, which declares and initializes n (Line A), defines adder, and returns adder in a context that includes n already having been defined and initialized to 1.

  • It is this function that was just returned that is assigned to counter1. Because the Line A is not part of that function (adder/counter1), it does not get executed when that function is called.

  • Each call to counter1 is executed in that same context, which is why n retains its value across calls: they are all accessing the same n.

2
  • 1) Your 2nd bullet, the word 'this' refers to what? Can you please make an edit. 2) My question is why doesn't the context begin from var n = 0 why is it only from the function call? You are saying what I do know. I don't know why it happens that way!
    – Honey
    Jun 15 '16 at 15:18
  • "this" is the function adder. The context is not the code that ran but the variables the code created and initialised. var n = 0 is not part of the context, a variable n initialised to 0 is.
    – JeremyP
    Jun 15 '16 at 15:25
1

You've called makeCounter() once. That creates your new closure, and assigns it to counter1. This closure closes over the mutable var n, and will remain captured as long as this closure exists.

Calling counter1() will execute it, but it retains the same captured n, and mutates it. This particular "adder" will ALWAYS capture this same n, so long as it exists..

To get the behavior you're suggesting, you need to make new closures which capture new instances of n:

let counter1 = makeCounter()

counter1() // returns 1
counter1() // returns 2
counter1() // returns 3

var counter2 = makeCounter()
counter2() // returns 1
counter2 = makeCounter()
counter2() // returns 1
counter2 = makeCounter()
counter2() // returns 1

Now both counter1 and counter2 each have their own separate instances of n.

8
  • How would you then reset a value each time you make a call? Perhaps knowing that would help me better understand
    – Honey
    Jun 15 '16 at 15:22
  • 1
    You would need to make a new closure with makeCounter() again. During the call to makeCounter(), a new n variable will be made, and a new closure will capture that new n. Then
    – Alexander
    Jun 15 '16 at 15:24
  • The whole point of closures is the reference semantics. If you wanted value semantics, you could have just passed in n as a param to the closure. This would make a copy of n local to the closure, and independent of the outside one.
    – Alexander
    Jun 15 '16 at 15:27
  • 2
    Line A is part of makeCounter; it is not part of adder/counter1. Jun 15 '16 at 15:31
  • 1
    @Honey Line A isn't called other than during the execution makeCounter() Line A makes a new var n, and it's done, It's over. Until you call makeCounter() again, Line A is irrelevant. The closure just captures the n that happens to exist after Line A
    – Alexander
    Jun 15 '16 at 15:31

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