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I have a project that does not allow us to change the SPROCS, but I wanted to use something to automatically map the datareader rows to a POCO class. In came Dapper to the rescue. For the most part it works great, but in some cases where I need to populate nested classes. For example, I have this model

public class Account
{
    public string AccountNumber { get; set; }

    /* Removed for brevity */

    public Contact Contact { get; set; }
}

public class Contact
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
}

my respository just looked like this:

/// <summary>
/// Lists a range of items
/// </summary>
/// <param name="storedProcedureName">The name of the SPROC to execute</param>
/// <param name="parameters">The parameters needed for the SPROC</param>
/// <returns></returns>
public async Task<IList<T>> ListAsync(string storedProcedureName, OracleDynamicParameters parameters = null)
{
    return await ExecuteReaderAsync(storedProcedureName, parameters);
}

/// <summary>
/// Private method for executing a reader and returning the results as a list
/// </summary>
/// <param name="storedProcedureName">The name of the SPROC to execute</param>
/// <param name="parameters">The parameters needed for the SPROC</param>
/// <returns></returns>
private async Task<IList<T>> ExecuteReaderAsync(string storedProcedureName, OracleDynamicParameters parameters = null)
{

    // Init command
    InitializeCommand(storedProcedureName, parameters);

    // Dynamically populate our list
    var list = await this._connection.QueryAsync<T>(storedProcedureName, parameters, commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure);

    // Dispose
    DisposeCommand();

    // Return our list
    return list.ToList();
}

which can be called from any service a bit like this:

return await Repository.ListAsync("IBPA_ORDERS.readLines", parameters);

Like I said, this works fine for a POCO class with no child classes, but as you can see, the Account model has a Contact. Apparently you can get the contact populated using Lambda expressions like this:

.Select(x => new Account
{
    AccountNumber = x.AccountNumber 
    Contact = new Contact 
    {
        FirstName = x.Firstname,
        LastName = x.LastName
    }
});

So, I am trying to update my Repository method to handle that. So far I have this:

/// <summary>
/// Private method for executing a reader and returning the results as a list
/// </summary>
/// <param name="storedProcedureName">The name of the SPROC to execute</param>
/// <param name="parameters">The parameters needed for the SPROC</param>
/// <returns></returns>
private async Task<IList<T>> ExecuteReaderAsync(string storedProcedureName, OracleDynamicParameters parameters = null, Func<dynamic, T> query = null)
{

    // Init command
    InitializeCommand(storedProcedureName, parameters);

    // Get our models
    var models = await this._connection.QueryAsync(storedProcedureName, parameters, commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure);

    // If we supply a query, use it. Otherwise cast the result as our type
    var results = query == null ? models.Select(m => (T)m) : models.Select(query);

    // Dispose
    DisposeCommand();

    // Return our list
    return results.ToList();
}

But I am not sure if that is correct. I have tried to call it like this:

// Execute and return our acctuons
return await Repository.ListAsync("IBPA_ACCOUNTSS.LIST", parameters, m => new Account {
    // LineRef = /* m is dynamic */
});

Because m is dynamic, I can't actually assign any properties.

Can someone help me out?

2
  • Should ExecuteReaderAsync look like ExecuteReaderAsync<T>? As far as I can tell by looking at this, it should work. When you say you're struggling to call, what do you mean? Do you have an example? Jun 15 '16 at 15:13
  • updated my question to explain the issue a bit more
    – r3plica
    Jun 15 '16 at 15:15
0

I might be a little bit confused, but I think what you're asking is if you can have Dapper perform the deserialization so that Account.Contact is populated correctly.

If the returned columns are ordered such that all of the Account properties are first, and all of the Contact properties follow, then you can use Dapper's Multi Mapping feature.

For example:

Func<Account, Contact, Account> map = (a, c) => { a.Contact = c; return a; };

var results = conn.Query<Account, Contact, Account>(
    sql: storedProcedureName,
    map: map,
    splitOn: "FirstName",
    param: parameters,
    commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure);

In the above code, Dapper is expecting to start by deserialiazing an Account. Then, when it reaches a column named "FirstName", it will start deserializing into a Contact. Once it's done, it will call map which will combine all of the deserialized types into just a single return value (Account).

The type arguments can be seen as: <DeserializeType1, DeserializeType2, ..., ReturnType>.

The splitOn argument defaults to "Id" because that's commonly the first column name of any table. I believe splitOn also accepts a comma-delimited list of column names, which might be handy if you're combining more than two tables, and the split columns are different.


If the results from the query/SProc are not in any particular order (say it returned columns in the order FirstName, AccountNumber, LastName), then Dapper's not going to be able to help you there.

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