122

How to pass optional arguments to a method in C++ ? Any code snippet...

  • 11
    You don't pass option parameters. You pass optional arguments! – Chubsdad Sep 24 '10 at 4:57
  • For more explicit control than that provided by reserving sentinel values, check out boost::optional<>. – Tony Delroy Sep 24 '10 at 6:54
155

Here is an example of passing mode as optional parameter

void myfunc(int blah, int mode = 0)
{
    if (mode == 0)
        do_something();
     else
        do_something_else();
}

you can call myfunc in both ways and both are valid

myfunc(10);     // Mode will be set to default 0
myfunc(10, 1);  // Mode will be set to 1
  • Can you pls provide some example related to string ? – Swapnil Gupta Sep 24 '10 at 4:20
  • void myfunc(int blah, char mode[] = NULL) – Pramendra Gupta Sep 24 '10 at 4:28
  • 2
    NULL means a NULL pointer, even though it would be defined as literal 0. It is not a universal name for constant zero. For integers (non-pointers) you should use numbers: int mode = 0. – UncleBens Sep 24 '10 at 4:53
  • 1
    If you're working with a class (source and header files), where would you define the default value? – AceFunk Dec 21 '17 at 12:34
  • 3
    @AceFunk Super late, but the code I've seen has the default value defined in the header. If you think about it, the system wouldn't know that you can omit the value if the optional was defined in the source – Mars May 8 '18 at 8:18
54

An important rule with respect to default parameter usage:
Default parameters should be specified at right most end, once you specify a default value parameter you cannot specify non default parameter again. ex:

int DoSomething(int x, int y = 10, int z) -----------> Not Allowed

int DoSomething(int x, int z, int y = 10) -----------> Allowed 
  • @Chubsdad - Ahh..my bad ambigious statement! does the second statement sums it correctly? "once you specify a default value parameter you cannot specify non default parmeter again" – Alok Save Sep 24 '10 at 5:07
  • 1
    So if I understand correctly if I have multiple optional parameters I should either implement all of them or none at all? I cannot choose to use 1 optional parameter but not the rest? – Gerard Apr 24 '14 at 10:19
  • @Gerard: The "Allowed" example shows one optional parameter and not the rest use case which is valid. – Alok Save Apr 24 '14 at 16:25
  • 5
    I understand, but what if I were to have int foo(int x, int y = 10, int z = 10) and would want to call foo(1,2), so only giving one optional parameter. I did not seem to be able to get it to work myself. – Gerard Apr 24 '14 at 16:30
32

It might be interesting to some of you that in case of multiple default parameters:

void printValues(int x=10, int y=20, int z=30)
{
    std::cout << "Values: " << x << " " << y << " " << z << '\n';
}

Given the following function calls:

printValues(1, 2, 3);
printValues(1, 2);
printValues(1);
printValues();

The following output is produced:

Values: 1 2 3
Values: 1 2 30
Values: 1 20 30
Values: 10 20 30

Reference: http://www.learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/77-default-parameters/

  • 1
    This is what i was looking for. Use one function which can handle different number of arguments. Declare function with default value in header file then define it without default Parameters and then you can use it. No need of making function overload – Teh Sunn Liu Oct 27 '16 at 1:57
16

Use default parameters

template <typename T>
void func(T a, T b = T()) {

   std::cout << a << b;

}

int main()
{
    func(1,4); // a = 1, b = 4
    func(1);   // a = 1, b = 0

    std::string x = "Hello";
    std::string y = "World";

    func(x,y);  // a = "Hello", b ="World"
    func(x);    // a = "Hello", b = "" 

}

Note : The following are ill-formed

template <typename T>
void func(T a = T(), T b )

template <typename T>
void func(T a, T b = a )
  • Thanks for the general solution, I was trying to figure out how to provide a default value for any arbitrary type. – Anonymous May 14 '18 at 19:59
16

To follow the example given here, but to clarify syntax with the use of header files, the function forward declaration contains the optional parameter default value.

myfile.h

void myfunc(int blah, int mode = 0);

myfile.cpp

void myfunc(int blah, int mode) /* mode = 0 */
{
    if (mode == 0)
        do_something();
     else
        do_something_else();
}
10

With commas separating them, just like parameters without default values.

int func( int x = 0, int y = 0 );

func(); // doesn't pass optional parameters, defaults are used, x = 0 and y = 0

func(1, 2); // provides optional parameters, x = 1 and y = 2
9

Typically by setting a default value for a parameter:

int func(int a, int b = -1) { 
    std::cout << "a = " << a;
    if (b != -1)        
        std::cout << ", b = " << b;
    std::cout << "\n";
}

int main() { 
    func(1, 2);  // prints "a=1, b=2\n"
    func(3);     // prints "a=3\n"
    return 0;
}
9

With the introduction of std::optional in C++17 you can pass optional arguments:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <optional>

void myfunc(const std::string& id, const std::optional<std::string>& param = std::nullopt)
{
    std::cout << "id=" << id << ", param=";

    if (param)
        std::cout << *param << std::endl;
    else
        std::cout << "<parameter not set>" << std::endl;
}

int main() 
{
    myfunc("first");
    myfunc("second" , "something");
}

Output:

id=first param=<parameter not set>
id=second param=something

See https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/optional

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