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With EMCAScript6, I see there's a way to represent binary literals using the 0b or 0B prefix. I was experimenting with it, and couldn't find a way to represent a negative number (since it's not using two's-complement). Am I missing something? I can't find where binary literals are explained in the actual spec.

I suppose I could implement it myself with an operation like ~(num - 1) or -num:

function twosComplement(num) {
  return ~(num - 1);
}

var flag = 0b100;

console.log(flag);
console.log(twosComplement(flag));

// is this output normal? I thought binary used a sign bit
console.log(twosComplement(flag).toString(2));

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  • -0b100? I don't think binary literals (or any other numeric literals) are supposed to be thought of as tied to a specific binary representation, so you need to indicate a negative literal value if you want a negative result.
    – Jeremy
    Jun 15, 2016 at 17:48
  • @JeremyBanks You're probably right. I was excited for a moment that maybe they hadn't abstracted that away. Is there a spec reference?
    – 4castle
    Jun 15, 2016 at 17:53
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    Numeric literals are here in the spec, which includes BinaryIntegerLiteral, though it doesn't seem to specify the - prefix, so I think that's just the negation operator.
    – user1106925
    Jun 15, 2016 at 17:56
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    @squint Interesting! I guess I never realized that a negative literal (of any base) is actually interpreted as a positive literal, and then it's negated.
    – 4castle
    Jun 15, 2016 at 18:06
  • 0b100 is converted to 4 integer on assignment. What's wrong with -0b100 then? Binary literals are not tied to word size and not real binaries, so isn't toString() return value. Jun 15, 2016 at 18:06

1 Answer 1

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To input negative number just prefix your literal with - sign (unary minus operator):

-0b11010 // -26

Specification for binary literals is in section Numeric Literals.

Relevant fragment:

NumericLiteral :: (...) BinaryIntegerLiteral

BinaryIntegerLiteral :: 0b BinaryDigits

And BinaryDiggits are 0 and 1.

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