5

Can somebody explain how does std::declval work? I've found this implementation inside gcc headers/type_traits (lines 2248-2262), which is (cleared up a bit to improve readability):

template<typename _Tp>
struct __declval_protector
{
    static const bool __stop = false;
    static typename add_rvalue_reference<_Tp>::type __delegate();
};

template<typename _Tp>
typename add_rvalue_reference<_Tp>::type
declval ()
{
    static_assert(__declval_protector<_Tp>::__stop, "declval() must not be used!");
    return __declval_protector<_Tp>::__delegate();
}

I don't understand the part return __declval_protector<_Tp>::__delegate(), does it call the default initializer for an Rvalue reference of type T? Also i don't understand why the static_assert is not called every time I call declval, since __stop is always false (And how can it distinguish between unevaluated contexts and evaluated ones?).

EDIT: From what I understand now, all this stuff is equivalent to:

template<typenam _Tp>
struct __declval_protector
{
    const bool __stop = false;
};

template<typename _Tp>
typename add_rvalue_reference<_Tp>::type
mydeclval ()
{
    static_assert(__declval_protector<_Tp>::__stop, "declval() must not be used!");
}

But of course the compiler will issue that we do not return anything.

3
  • __delegate is a function. It's just like int f();, and the you say f().
    – Kerrek SB
    Commented Jun 15, 2016 at 18:33
  • @vsoftco I have reopened the question as I am pretty sure it is not a duplicate. The question has a misleading title but it targets declval protector usage, not declval principles of work. Commented Jun 3, 2018 at 10:52
  • Does this answer your question? How does std::declval<T>() work? Commented Dec 25, 2021 at 6:10

1 Answer 1

18

I don't understand why the static_assert is not called every time I call declval, since __stop is always false

Your premise is wrong. The static assert is indeed called every time you call declval. The trick is that you must never call declval. It must only be used in unevaluated contexts. That's why the static assertion is there.

11
  • And what's the purpose of the return statement?
    – Mattia F.
    Commented Jun 15, 2016 at 18:37
  • 1
    @MattiaF.: To make the function well-formed and avoid warnings perhaps? Note that the function isn't defined, by the way.
    – Kerrek SB
    Commented Jun 15, 2016 at 18:39
  • I am surprised gcc actually has this implementation. I'd expect it to have declaration only. Are they trying to be nice to users? :)
    – SergeyA
    Commented Jun 15, 2016 at 18:40
  • 2
    @T.C. It would be a lot simpler if we could just allow static_assert(false, ...) in these cases.
    – Barry
    Commented Jun 15, 2016 at 18:56
  • 5
    @Mattia F. If a static_assert isn't dependent on a template parameter, it fires whether the template is instantiated or not.
    – md5i
    Commented Jun 15, 2016 at 19:16

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