29

How can I convert the function below to to swift 3? Currently getting a Binary operator '..<' cannot be applied to operands of type 'Int' and 'Self.IndexDistance' error.

extension MutableCollection where Index == Int {
  /// Shuffle the elements of `self` in-place.
  mutating func shuffleInPlace() {
    // empty and single-element collections don't shuffle
    if count < 2 { return }

    for i in 0..<count - 1 { //error takes place here
      let j = Int(arc4random_uniform(UInt32(count - i))) + i
      guard i != j else { continue }
      swap(&self[i], &self[j])
    }
  }
}

reference: https://stackoverflow.com/a/24029847/5222077

78

count returns an IndexDistance which is the type describing the distance between two collection indices. IndexDistance is required to be a SignedInteger, but need not be an Int and can be different from Index. Therefore it is not possible to create the range 0..<count - 1.

A solution is to use startIndex and endIndex instead of 0 and count:

extension MutableCollection where Index == Int {
    /// Shuffle the elements of `self` in-place.
    mutating func shuffle() {
        // empty and single-element collections don't shuffle
        if count < 2 { return }

        for i in startIndex ..< endIndex - 1 {
            let j = Int(arc4random_uniform(UInt32(endIndex - i))) + i
            if i != j {
                swap(&self[i], &self[j])
            }
        }
    }
}

Another advantage is that this also works correctly with array slices (where the index of the first element is not necessarily zero).

Note that according to the new "Swift API Design Guidelines", shuffle() is the "proper" name for a mutating shuffle method, and shuffled() for the non-mutating counterpart which returns an array:

extension Collection {
    /// Return a copy of `self` with its elements shuffled
    func shuffled() -> [Iterator.Element] {
        var list = Array(self)
        list.shuffle()
        return list
    }
}

Update: A (even more general) Swift 3 version has been added to How do I shuffle an array in Swift? in the meantime.


For Swift 4 (Xcode 9) one has to replace the call to the swap() function by a call to the swapAt() method of the collection. Also the restriction on the Index type is no longer needed:

extension MutableCollection {
    /// Shuffle the elements of `self` in-place.
    mutating func shuffle() {
        for i in indices.dropLast() {
            let diff = distance(from: i, to: endIndex)
            let j = index(i, offsetBy: numericCast(arc4random_uniform(numericCast(diff))))
            swapAt(i, j)
        }
    }
}

See SE-0173 Add MutableCollection.swapAt(_:_:) for more information about swapAt.


As of Swift 4.2 (Xcode 10, currently in beta), with the implementation of SE-0202 Random Unification, shuffle() and shuffled() are part of the Swift standard library.

  • 3
    You are a genius – DawnSong Nov 10 '16 at 15:58
  • Just felt like I should point out that the + i in let j probably should be + startIndex instead. Else this is very likely to result in index out of bounds. – Bjarke H. Søndergaard Jan 31 '17 at 6:24
  • @BjarkeH.Søndergaard: I am fairly sure that the above code is correct, and I had tested it with both arrays and array slices. i is in the range startIndex..<endIndex-1, and a random number in range 0..<endIndex-i is added to i, so that j >= i >= startIndex and j < i + (endIndex-i) = endIndex. – Martin R Jan 31 '17 at 6:34
  • Ah, I now see where I read your code wrong. Sorry, it's early morning still. I had read your j as endIndex-1 and not endIndex-i. :) – Bjarke H. Søndergaard Jan 31 '17 at 7:04
  • It seems to me that startIndex..<endIndex - 1 should either be startIndex...endIndex -1 or startIndex..<endIndex as the second one already stops and one less than endIndex, and the and the first one without the - 1 would go to endIndex resulting in an Index out of bounds. The way it is written in the code block should never touch the last element of the array. Or is my understanding how of the ... and ..< work that incorrect? – Mark Dail Jun 7 '17 at 13:20
10

There is a fisher-yates shuffle in Gamekit:

import GameKit
let unshuffledArray = [1,2,3,4]
let shuffledArray = GKRandomSource.sharedRandom().arrayByShufflingObjects(in: unshuffledArray)
print(shuffledArray)

You can also pass in and store a random seed, so you get the same sequence of pseudorandom shuffle values every time you supply the same seed in case you need to recreate a simulation.

import GameKit
let unshuffledArray = [1,2,3,4]
let randomSource = GKLinearCongruentialRandomSource(seed: 1)
let shuffledArray = randomSource.arrayByShufflingObjects(in: unshuffledArray)
//Always [1,4,2,3]
print(shuffledArray)
8

I would suggest simply shuffling arrays instead of trying to extend this to collections in general:

extension Array {
    mutating func shuffle () {
        for i in (0..<self.count).reversed() {
            let ix1 = i
            let ix2 = Int(arc4random_uniform(UInt32(i+1)))
            (self[ix1], self[ix2]) = (self[ix2], self[ix1])
        }
    }
}
0

You can use the NSArray Extension from GameplayKit framework for this:

import GameplayKit

extension Collection {
    func shuffled() -> [Iterator.Element] {
        let shuffledArray = (self as? NSArray)?.shuffled()
        let outputArray = shuffledArray as? [Iterator.Element]
        return outputArray ?? []
    }
    mutating func shuffle() {
        if let selfShuffled = self.shuffled() as? Self {
            self = selfShuffled
        }
    }
}

// Usage example:

var numbers = [1,2,3,4,5]
numbers.shuffle()

print(numbers) // output example: [2, 3, 5, 4, 1]

print([10, "hi", 9.0].shuffled()) // output example: [hi, 10, 9]

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