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I'm on a project in which I'm failing to see the point of how a previous developer made decisions.

  1. same exact method names in DAL and BAL
  2. static is EVERYWHERE
  3. what should i do with New methods to follow best practices?

example of existing code:

Calling appliction (could be console app or web app etc.. agnostic )

DataSet DS = CreditMgr.GetCreditRqstInfo(ddlGEO.Text);

BAL

public class CreditMgr
{
   public static DataSet GetCreditRqstInfo(String GeoID)
    {
        try
        {
            DataSet DS = new DataSet();
            DS = CreditIntfDB.GetCreditRqstInfo(GeoID);
            return DS;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw ex;
        }
    }
}

DAL

public class CreditIntfDB
{
     public static DataSet GetCreditRqstInfo(String GeoID)
    {
        try
        {
            Database DB = new SqlDatabase(Common.ConnectionString);
            String SQLCommand = Common.SPGetRqstInfo;
            DbCommand DBCommand = DB.GetStoredProcCommand(SQLCommand);
            DBCommand.CommandTimeout = Common.CommandTimeOut;
            DB.AddInParameter(DBCommand, "@a_geo_id", DbType.String, GeoID);
            DataSet DS = new DataSet();
            DB.LoadDataSet(DBCommand, DS, new String[] { "CreditRqstInfo" });

            return DS;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw ex;
        }
    }
}

Yes, the whole point is to have layers of separation, but when the same method names are being used , and static, and each are simply doing the same exact thing with passing in string and returning a DataSet has "code smell" to me

Suggestions on better ways?

  • Even though the names are same if you could Suffix with BAL or DAL would be easy to identify. I am sure namespace shows whether a class belonged to BAL or DAL . – Venky Jun 15 '16 at 21:33
  • 2
    Yes, the code is bad, but what's your question exactly? catch (Exception ex) { throw ex; } ughhh. – Blorgbeard Jun 15 '16 at 21:34
  • This may be more appropriate for Stack Exchange Code Review. In general I agree with you - layers for the sake of layers is not good design. Each layer needs a purpose; every class needs a responsibility. If you don't have any meaningful business logic, then the BAL may not be valuable for your case. – Tim Copenhaver Jun 15 '16 at 21:38
  • thank you all , yes same method names and signatures, static, just does not scream of a good pattern – user6321478 Jun 15 '16 at 21:41
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According to standard Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) design, your BAL classes should represent "things" that have some real world business meaning. Instead of having a CreditMgr that has a static method to get a CreditRqst, create a class CreditRequest that stores its own data (e.g. the DataSet), and preferably wraps it in some business-friendly manner (e.g. List of CreditLine or List of Account).

From there, you can either implement the Get method inside of CreditRequest, or you can turn CreditMgr into a service object (such as "CreditBureau", "Bank", "AccountsDesk", etc.), that has a method that takes a String GeoID and returns a CreditRequest.

In addition, using strings as keys (e.g. in GeoID) is smelly as well. Can you come up with something a little more strongly typed? You could create a class GeoID that enforces requirements (such as maximum length, allowable characters, checksum requirements, etc.)

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