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Hello this question should apply to more connection pool managers than c3p0 but I'll use that one for example.

One option c3p0 offers for connection pool management is to test the connections before they are checked into the connection pool. Does this mean after the application has used the connection? If so, wouldn't the connection always be valid if it was just used by the application?

Unless my understanding is wrong, this seems like a useless time to check whether a connection is valid since an invalid connection would have thrown an exception when the app tried using it.

Update: The real question I was asking is whether or not a stale connection that just failed in the app would still be checked back into the pool to ultimately fail again and again? If the answer is no, then test on check in would be pointless since 'exploded' connections would never be sent back to the pool. I've been using c3p0 with testOnCheckIn and a test query interval for years without actually diving this deep to understand why.

  • It's a waste of time anyway, as the only question of interest is whether the connection is valid when you check it out. This is the time to test it. The only possible benefit is not to pool stale connections, which might be a space saving at the client, but it won't benefit the server, which must have clearly already closed its end if it doesn't test as valid at the client. – user207421 Jun 16 '16 at 4:54
  • @EJP so you agree with my assumption then? This is indeed a waste of time. – Usman Mutawakil Jun 16 '16 at 4:55
  • Is there something unclear about what I wrote? – user207421 Jun 16 '16 at 4:59
  • @EJP Just double confirming since testOnCheckout is the recommended approach by the people supporting c3P0. The doc cautions against testOnCheckOut for performance reasons but I will inevitably end up doing that instead as a simple query on each transaction is something I can afford with my current load. Thanks. – Usman Mutawakil Jun 16 '16 at 5:04
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Does this mean after the application has used the connection?

Yes

If so, wouldn't the connection always be valid if it was just used by the application?

What if your app used the connection, but it appeared to be broken, so it threw an exception? In that case if you just put it back into the pool it will be returned again and another request would fail. After some time more connections could end up broken and the ratio of failed requests would increase.

The reason why some people tend to test after check in is that they are afraid of performance implications of checkout-testing. Your request would have to wait until a SQL query is made which involves network traffic. That can or cannot be a real hazard to your app.

I personally haven't done any performance testing and don't know how serious this issue is, but that also depends on the level of latency you expect from your app. You may also rely on the async testing of the connections as pointed out by @Steve Waldman - this way you test your connection outside of the request handling thread.

  • Thanks. I guess it makes sense that even after the stale connection has just caused a crash, the pool would have no way of knowing and check it back in. – Usman Mutawakil Jun 18 '16 at 14:00
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Whether testing Connections on checkout is a performance problem largely depends on how efficient the test is, and how much work a Connection does when it is checked out. As you say, the safest, simplest way to configure Connection testing is to test on checkout. But it also means that clients must experience the latency of the test.

If you want Connections to be tested asynchronously, that is outside of client codepaths, then you want to test Connections on check-in, and periodically while the Connections are checked in. Basically, the strategy is to ensure that Connections idle in the pool are very unlikely to be invalid, so that you can safely check them out without testing. ("Safely" of course is a matter of degree. Even with test-on-checkout, a Connection can become invalidated between the test and the first client use.)

It is not a good idea to presume that a Connection is valid on check-in because a client has just used it. First of all, the fact that a client experiences an Exception doesn't necessarily signal to the pool that the Connection is invalid. For example, calls to Connection.commit() can fail because of concurrent modifications of a row in the transaction, even though the Connection is perfectly valid. Fundamentally, Exceptions experienced when Connections are checked-out are the client's business, not the pool's. c3p0 (I think unusually) does notice Exceptions experienced by clients, and triggers a silent Connection test so that the pool can reason about Connection validity. But there are lots of reasons why clients might experience Exceptions from a valid Connection.

Secondly, the pool cannot rely upon prompt check-in of the Connection following last-use by the client. It's a bad idea, but clients often hold Connections open for much longer than their actual database work. Any window of time between las client use and check-in would obviously be a window during which a Connection could go bad.

So, if you want asynchronous Connection testing -- i.e. Connection testing that (for a sufficiently sized pool) makes no contribution to client latency -- you want a test-on-checkin and then frequent tests while Connections are pooled and idle.

All of this said, in practical terms, the need for asynchronous Connection testing has diminished because JDBC drivers now offer fast, reliable tests via Connection.isValid(). Once upon a time, in order to define DBMS independent, reliable Connection tests, c3p0 had to default to an often-very-slow query against database metadata. The latency of this test could be a real hit to client performance. With Connection.isValid() (or an efficient preferredTestQuery), tests are often fast enough that the simplicity and robustness of test-on-checkout more than outweighs the small client latency hit. c3p0 docs used to advise use of asynchronous Connection testing for performance reasons. The current documentation advises synchronous test-on-checkout first, only backing off to asynchronous testing as a potential optimization if test latency affects performance. For the most part, in practice, you usually end up just using testConnectionsOnCheckout now.

  • "c3p0 (I think unusually) does notice Exceptions experienced by clients, and triggers a silent Connection test so that the pool can reason about Connection validity" I haven't heard of this feature - is there a mentioning in the docs or you've seen this in the sources? – Stanislav Bashkyrtsev Jun 19 '16 at 8:02
  • I wrote the sources! see github.com/swaldman/c3p0/blob/… and github.com/swaldman/c3p0/blob/… – Steve Waldman Jun 19 '16 at 8:12
  • That's cool :) Would be great to mention it somewhere in the docs near the testing documentation. Is this check happening right when the exception happens or it's async after the connection is returned to the pool? And what are the implications (if the connection is actually broken)? – Stanislav Bashkyrtsev Jun 19 '16 at 8:39
  • thanks! if the Connection is broken, it is "excluded", meaning the pool quietly destroys it on user close(), rather than checking it back in. it's not documented because it should be transparent to the user -- just a way to get better robsutness, not a "feature" -- and it's not configurable. if i can think of some non-awkward way to do so, maybe i'll mention it somewhere when next i revise the docs. – Steve Waldman Jun 20 '16 at 6:55
  • Got it, thanks. Also on async checks: "All of this said, in practical terms, the need for asynchronous Connection testing has diminished because JDBC drivers now offer fast". I think they still are needed e.g. for the cases when there are firewalls between the app and DB that can interrupt the connections. Also in case of MySQL it drops the connection if there was no activity for a long time. So async checks are still important as for me. – Stanislav Bashkyrtsev Jun 21 '16 at 5:51

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