2

So I have been trying to teach myself how to do this stuff and have had marginal success so far, I'm working on an exercise I found on codewars.com and I'm kind of stuck. The goal is to make a function that verifies the inputted pin meets the requirements, those requirements being: PIN must be either 4 or 6 digits long and PIN must be strictly numerical

I ran into a number of problems with it and ultimately came to the code below:

import re
def validate_pin(pin):
    for x in pin:
        if x.isalpha():
            return False
        elif re.match(".", pin):
            return False
    if len(pin) == 4 or len(pin) == 6:
        return True
    else:
        return False

I really, really, really, didn't want to ask for help but I have absolutely positively no idea why the above code doesn't work. It returns false on "1234" as input and I have racked my head over this for 2 days now. I refreshed myself on for loops, read up on regex, I tried searching forums but am completely stumped on what to look for. Any help anyone can provide would be greatly and deeply appreciated.

Edit: Wow! I didn't expect such positive feedback I appreciate it everyone! Thanks for helping me understand I have seen where I went wrong and will study it extra hard. Thanks for all the feedback!

4
  • 5
    What are you trying to do with elif re.match(".", pin): in a loop ?
    – polku
    Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 8:32
  • 4
    return len(pin) in (4, 6) and pin.isdigit() Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 8:35
  • @AndreaCorbellini '1'.isdigit() is True too (full-width character "1"); not sure whether that's desired...
    – deceze
    Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 8:37
  • @polku well when i had it lower it failed on ".234" so i remembered a while back that if statements are sequential once one returns true or reaches the else statement it leaves the if statement, so i thought by raising it higher it would complete through successfully, I can't remember what happened when i put it above the "len(pin)" bit but I didn't like the result so I put it in the for loop and thats when I got stuck
    – xero657
    Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 9:39

4 Answers 4

7

There is a simpler way to validate it using regex. The reason why you're getting False returned on "1234" is because of that regex match. A point (.) matches ALL characters except for newline, so that match will almost always succeed. That's not what you want.

Here is a simpler solution I talked about earlier:

import re
def validate_pin(pin):
    if re.fullmatch("\d{4}|\d{6}", pin):
        return True
    else:
        return False

This will only work in Python 3.4 and above, since the fullmatch function was added in 3.4
If you're using an earlier version, use re.match("\d{4}$|\d{6}$", pin) instead

Some regex explanation:
This character "\d" matches only digits. The number in curly brackets that follows it shows exactly how many of the preceding token ("\d" in our case) we want to match. This "|" acts like an OR, telling that we can either match 4 digits, or 6 digits.
fullmatch will only return a match object if the entire string matches the pattern. But since we don't have that function in the earlier versions, this behaviour can be simulated by adding a "$" at the end of our pattern. It shows that we want this pattern to only match the end of the string and match function matches the characters from the beginning only. So combining these properties, we get a pattern that will only match the entire string

As suggested in the comments, to shorten the code, you can write the conditional like this:

def validate_pin(pin):
    return bool(re.fullmatch("\d{4}|\d{6}", pin))

If the match succeeded, the explicit conversion to bool will return True, if it didn't - it will return False

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  • 1
    Same comment as on the other answer: don’t write conditionals like this; write return bool(re.fullmatch("\d{4}|\d{6}", pin)). Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 8:51
  • @KonradRudolph why is it bad to write conditionals? The asker is learning Python, it's better to make the return values clear. Yes, your way shortens the code, but not neccesarily simplifies the understanding
    – illright
    Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 8:53
  • 1
    It’s not about shortening the code, it’s about making it logical. Having an if here simply makes no sense and consequently introduces clutter, rather than clarity. You already have a truthy object, you want to return a truthy object, it makes no sense to take a detour. It’s like writing + 0 (or * 1) after every numerical equation, since that doesn’t change the result. Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 8:54
  • (Just as an addition) Actually, my initial proposal does obscure to some extent. Better to be explicit, and write return re.fullmatch(…) is not None. And this is especially important to beginners: the must learn to understand idiomatically written code. It’s very counter-productive to coddle them and making them learn un-idiomatic code in the process. Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 9:33
  • @KonradRudolph this was a really helpful and informative answer, I actually learned a lot just from reading this. Thank you very much for taking time out to help me I really appreciate it.
    – xero657
    Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 9:41
3

Since your

PIN must be strictly numerical

This should not constitute something that will need a regex:

def validate_pin(pin):
    return len(pin) in (4, 6) and all(p in '0123456789' for p in pin)
4
  • Oh sprite! I can't even replicate that character on my machine Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 9:01
  • 1
    FWIW, that's the DEVANAGARI DIGIT ONE (U+0967). Any Unicode DIGIT is a digit to str.isdigit().
    – deceze
    Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 9:03
  • 1
    It doesn't need a regex, but \d{4}|\d{6} in fact expresses this line more concisely... :P – Good readable non-regex solution though.
    – deceze
    Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 9:13
  • @MosesKoledoye this wasn't something I even thought existed, either that or I completely glanced over it somewhere. Definitely going to be helpful in the future, thank you!
    – xero657
    Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 9:42
2

If you are allowed to use regex as I see from your code, why doesn't you use this regex ^(\d{4}|\d{6})$.

import re
p = re.compile(ur'^(\d{4}|\d{6})$')
return re.match(p, pin)
1
  • @KonradRudolph I don't know why I wrote that crap. Edited. Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 8:55
0

I think we can sort it without import, like this :

def validate_pin(pin):
    return len(pin) in (4, 6) and pin.isdigit()

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