2

Trying to generate all possible draws(combinations) for a lottery of unique 6 out of 42.

Actually looking for the most efficient way to do this (so that the actual generation does not take days).

Aside from the processing HOG (which is to be expected) .. i'm running into a memory limitation issue .. where my machine of 12GB ram cant hold 10% of the amount on number, let alone all combos.

So i decided to look into a Database alternative. But with that i have the problem of duplicates (since i do not have the whole list in memory to check for existence).

I tried a lot of code versions but all are resource consuming.

Currently looking for alternatives that actually work :)

Here's my latest code sample that employs a database for later record processing and filtering and duplication removal:

public List<Draw> getDrawsContaining(List<int> initialBalls)
    {
        if (initialBalls == null)
            initialBalls = new List<int>();

        if (initialBalls.Count >= 6)
            return new List<Draw> { new Draw(initialBalls) };

        List<Draw> toReturn = new List<Draw>();
        for (int i = 1; i <= 42; i++)
        {
            if (initialBalls.IndexOf(i) != -1)
                continue;

            initialBalls.Add(i);
            toReturn.AddRange(getDrawsContaining(initialBalls));
            initialBalls.Remove(i);
        }

        return toReturn;//.Distinct(dc).ToList();
    }

AND say in the Page_Load i fire this :

try
        {
            using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(sqlConnectionString))
            {
                connection.Open();
                String query = "TRUNCATE TABLE Draws";

                SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(query, connection);
                //command.Parameters.Add("@id", "abc");

                command.ExecuteNonQuery();
                connection.Close();
            }

            DataTable dt = new DataTable("Draws");
            dt.Columns.Add("Ball1");
            dt.Columns.Add("Ball2");
            dt.Columns.Add("Ball3");
            dt.Columns.Add("Ball4");
            dt.Columns.Add("Ball5");
            dt.Columns.Add("Ball6");

            for (int j = 1, k = 1; j <= 42 && k <= 42; )
            {
                List<Draw> drawsPart = getDrawsContaining(new List<int> { j, k });

                if (drawsPart.Count > 0)
                {
                    foreach (Draw d in drawsPart)
                    {
                        d.Balls.OrderBy(c => c);

                        DataRow dr = dt.NewRow();
                        dr["Ball1"] = d.Balls[0];
                        dr["Ball2"] = d.Balls[1];
                        dr["Ball3"] = d.Balls[2];
                        dr["Ball4"] = d.Balls[3];
                        dr["Ball5"] = d.Balls[4];
                        dr["Ball6"] = d.Balls[5];

                        dt.Rows.Add(dr);
                    }

                    DataTable tmp = dt.Copy();
                    dt.Rows.Clear();

                    AsyncDBSave AsyncDBSaveInstance = new AsyncDBSave(tmp, AsyncDBSaveDispose);
                    Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(AsyncDBSaveInstance.commit));
                    t.Start();
                }

                k++;
                if (k == 43) { j++; k = 1; }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            var v = ex.Message;
            throw;
        }
15
  • You aren't using a database at all. You are making the same calculations as before in a slower manner and still storing them in memory. At some point, you try to send them to a database instead of a file. Using a database means using SQL to do the work, not treat the database as a flat file Jun 16 '16 at 8:35
  • 1
    But with that i have the problem of duplicates .... How are you getting duplicates, generating all combinations if done properly shouldn't give you any duplicates oO Jun 16 '16 at 8:36
  • Calculating the numbers and saving them eg to a file isn't that much of an issue, although using a single thread to do it will take a LOOONG time. What are you going to do with them? There's no point in storing them in a database if you don't want to search for individual combinations. If you do want to search, why store all of them instead of only the interesting ones? Jun 16 '16 at 8:38
  • so you need to create all the permutations of 6 numbers, each between 1 and 42? Jun 16 '16 at 8:46
  • 2
    "Trying to generate all possible draws(combinations) for a lottery of unique 6 out of 42" - but why are you trying to do that? To what purpose? You know there are efficient ways of generating the n'th perm from this sequence, right? BTW, 42c6 = 5245786 - which is actually a pretty tiny number; you should totally be able to do this in RAM, on even a crappy laptop; 6 x 4 x 5245786 = 120 MiB for the raw data
    – Marc Gravell
    Jun 16 '16 at 8:47
4

Here we go... all very fast and efficient:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

static class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        byte[] results = new byte[6 * 5245786];
        byte[] current = new byte[6];
        int offset = 0;
        var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        Populate(results, ref offset, current, 0);
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Time to generate: {0}ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        Console.WriteLine("Data size: {0}MiB",
            (results.Length * sizeof(byte)) / (1024 * 1024));
        Console.WriteLine("All generated; press any key to show them");
        Console.ReadKey();
        for (int i = 0; i < 5245786; i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(Format(results, i));
        }
    }
    static string Format(byte[] results, int index)
    {
        int offset = 6 * index;
        return results[offset++] + "," + results[offset++] + "," +
           results[offset++] + "," + results[offset++] + "," +
           results[offset++] + "," + results[offset++];
    }

    static void Populate(byte[] results, ref int offset, byte[] current, int level)
    {
        // pick a new candidate; note since we're doing C not P, assume ascending order
        int last = level == 0 ? 0 : current[level - 1];
        for (byte i = (byte)(last + 1); i <= 42; i++)
        {
            current[level] = i;
            if (level == 5)
            {
                // write the results
                results[offset++] = current[0];
                results[offset++] = current[1];
                results[offset++] = current[2];
                results[offset++] = current[3];
                results[offset++] = current[4];
                results[offset++] = current[5];
            }
            else
            {
                // dive down
                Populate(results, ref offset, current, level + 1);
            }
        }
    }
}
6
  • heh, and for an extra bonus - changed from int[] to byte[]; 30MiB data; and unrolling the Array.Copy takes it to < 150ms on my local machine
    – Marc Gravell
    Jun 16 '16 at 9:35
  • Serves me right for accepting the 12GB value without actually calculating the number of combinations. Jun 16 '16 at 9:35
  • @PanagiotisKanavos meh, only off by a factor of 410... ;)
    – Marc Gravell
    Jun 16 '16 at 9:38
  • @MarcGravell Thank you for providing step 1 of the logic. Step 2, as mentioned in the original post. looking to generate Draws .. as actual object of type "Draw" .. not a sequence of numbers in an array....
    – Sam-Elie
    Jun 16 '16 at 10:03
  • @MarcGravell. Thank you Anyways. your solution is very effective and i can build on it.
    – Sam-Elie
    Jun 16 '16 at 10:42
0

Just for fun, non recursive version is about 2-3 times faster

static byte[] Populate2()
{
    byte[] results = new byte[6 * 5245786];
    int offset = 0;
    for (byte a1 = 1; a1 <= 37; ++a1)
        for (byte a2 = a1; ++a2 <= 38;)
            for (byte a3 = a2; ++a3 <= 39;)
                for (byte a4 = a3; ++a4 <= 40;)
                    for (byte a5 = a4; ++a5 <= 41;)
                        for (byte a6 = a5; ++a6 <= 42;)
                        {
                            results[offset] = a1;
                            results[offset+1] = a2;
                            results[offset+2] = a3;
                            results[offset+3] = a4;
                            results[offset+4] = a5;
                            results[offset+5] = a6;
                            offset += 6;
                        }
    return results;
}

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