7
var myArray = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

function isOdd(value){
    return value % 2;
}

for(var i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++){
    if(isOdd(myArray[i])){
        myArray.splice(i,1);
        i--;
    }
}

The code above takes an array of arbitrary length and checks each value. If the value of the bit of the array meets an arbitrary condition (in this case if it is odd), then it is removed from the array.

Array.prototype.splice() is used to remove the value from the array, and then i is decremented to account for the rest of the values in the array "moving down" to fill in the gap that the removed value left (so the loop doesn't skip over a value).

However, the for loop ends when i equals the length of the array, which gets shorter as values are removed.

Does the value of myArray.length decrease dynamically as the loop proceeds, or does it save the value at the start of the loop and not update as values are removed? If the latter, what can I do to fix my loop?

Thank you!

3

myArray.length is changing with the operation on the array. But looping and splicing leads to unwanted results, if not proper padded.

To prevent unnecessary corrections, use a while loop from the end, to keep the rest of the array for processing.

function isOdd(value) {
    return value % 2;
}

var myArray = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9],
    i = myArray.length;

while (i--) {
    if (isOdd(myArray[i])) {
        myArray.splice(i, 1);
    }
}
console.log(myArray);

  • I'd suggest that the higher-order Array.prototype.filter() method is the better choice for this sort of operation. Code depending on the filter() method is considerably more concise and, I would say, considerably more readable. – Tex Jun 16 '16 at 8:55
  • you are right, but the problem is one with splice, and the drawbacks of it with looping. – Nina Scholz Jun 16 '16 at 8:58
  • @Tex - .filter() is certainly easier to use, but it creates a new array rather than modifying the original array which is not the same implementation as the OP has. Sometimes, if other code has a reference to this array, you want to modify the array rather than replace with a new one. – jfriend00 Jun 16 '16 at 8:58
  • @jfriend00 It's generally considered better practice to create a new array rather than modify an existing one, but if the asker absolutely needs to modify the existing array, they can simply set the value of the existing one to the result of .filter(). – Tex Jun 16 '16 at 9:00
  • 1
    @Tex - Whether it is appropriate to create a new array or modify the current one depends entirely upon the programming situation. You can't say it's always a "better practice" to create a new array. If 10 objects have a reference to this master array, then you may have to modify it rather than create a new one in order to achieve the desired effect. It depends upon the programming situation. I'm just pointing out that your recommendation does NOT provide the exact same "in place" modification that the OP's code was intending to do. That may be OK or may not, depending upon the situation. – jfriend00 Jun 16 '16 at 9:04
0

The length property is read in every iteration, and the splice method does update its value, so it works as you would expect. However, I would say that this is not a good coding practice, a while loop is much more readable, so it should be the obvious choice.

To answer the question directly: you don't have to use while instead of for, but you definitely should.

0

Use Array.filter instead

var myArray = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];
myArray=myArray.filter(function(item,index) {
 return !(item % 2);
})

console.log(myArray)

0

This is where you'd want to use Array.prototype.filter() if you don't absolutely HAVE to modify the original array, in-place.

As you suspect, the .length property of the array is being updated every time you splice(). The filter() method was built for exactly this sort of operation.

var myArray = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

function isOdd(value){
    return value % 2;
}

var filteredArray = myArray.filter(function(item){
  return !isOdd(item);
});
    
console.log(filteredArray);

A more concise version of the above code:

var myArray = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

function isEven(value){
  return value % 2 === 0;
}
    
var filteredArray = myArray.filter(isEven);

console.log(filteredArray);

An even more concise version relying on ES6 arrow syntax:

var myArray = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

var isEven = value => value % 2 === 0;
    
var filteredArray = myArray.filter(isEven);

console.log(filteredArray);

And, in the event that you absolutely MUST edit the array in-place / use splice() here, I would recommend using Array.prototype.forEach() over a for or while loop. forEach() is another higher order method that allows you to realize the same functionality with less boilerplate. As with most higher order methods/functions, it allows you to focus on defining what you need to do rather than exactly how it needs to be done.

var myArray = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

function isOdd(value){
    return value % 2;
}

myArray.forEach(function(c, i, a){
    if(isOdd(c)){
        a.splice(i,1);
    }
})

console.log(myArray);

0

You can use both of them and it's depends on which one you like. if you prefer to use while loop then Nina's answer looks good and if you want to use for loop then consider to manage counter changes by yourself completely or when the length changes:

function isOdd(value) {
  return value % 2;
}

var arr1 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];

for (var i = 0; i < arr1.length;)
  isOdd(arr1[i]) ? arr1.splice(i, 1) : i++;
console.log(arr1);

var arr2 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];

for (var i = 0; i < arr2.length; i++)
  if (isOdd(arr2[i])) {
    arr2.splice(i, 1);
    i--;
  }
console.log(arr2);

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