Given a graph (say fully-connected), and a list of distances between all the points, is there an available way to calculate the number of dimensions required to instantiate the graph?

E.g. by construction, say we have graph G with points A, B, C and distances AB=BC=CA=1. Starting from A (0 dimensions) we add B at distance 1 (1 dimension), now we find that a 2nd dimension is needed to add C and satisfy the constraints. Does code exist to do this and spit out (in this case) dim(G) = 2?

E.g. if the points are photos, and the distances between them calculated by the Gist algorithm (http://people.csail.mit.edu/torralba/code/spatialenvelope/), I would expect the derived dimension to match the number image parameters considered by Gist.

Added: here is a 5-d python demo based on the suggestion - seemingly perfect! 'similarities' is the distance matrix.

import numpy as np

from sklearn import manifold

similarities = [[0., 1., 1., 1., 1., 1.], 
                [1., 0., 1., 1., 1., 1.],
                [1., 1., 0., 1., 1., 1.],
                [1., 1., 1., 0., 1., 1.],
                [1., 1., 1., 1., 0., 1.],
                [1., 1., 1., 1., 1., 0]]

seed = np.random.RandomState(seed=3)

for i in [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]:
    mds = manifold.MDS(n_components=i, max_iter=3000, eps=1e-9, random_state=seed,
               dissimilarity="precomputed", n_jobs=1)
    print("%d %f" % (i, mds.fit(similarities).stress_))

Output:

1 3.333333
2 1.071797
3 0.343146
4 0.151531
5 0.000000

I find that when I apply this method to a subset of my data (distances between 329 pictures with '11' in the file name, using two different metrics), the stress doesn't decrease to 0 as linearly I'd expect from the above - it levels off after about 5 dimensions. (On the SURF results I tried doubling max_iter, and varying eps by an order of magnitude each way without changing results in the first four digits.)

It turns out the distances do not satisfy the triangle inequality in ~0.02% of the triangles, with the average violation roughly equal to 8% the average distance, for one metric examined.

Overall I prefer the fractal dimension of the sorted distances since it is doesn't require picking a cutoff. I'm marking the MDS response as an answer because it works for the consistent case. My results for the fractal dimension and the MDS case are below.

Another descriptive statistic turns out to be the triangle violations. Results for this further below. If anyone could generalize to higher dimensions, that would be very interesting (results and learning python :-).

MDS results, ignoring the triangle inequality issue:

N_dim                  stress_
              SURF_match        GIST_match
   1      83859853704.027344   913512153794.477295
   2      24402474549.902721   238300303503.782837
   3      14335187473.611954   107098797170.304825
   4      10714833228.199451    67612051749.697998
   5       9451321873.828577    49802989323.714806
   6       8984077614.154467    40987031663.725784
   7       8748071137.806602    35715876839.391762
   8       8623980894.453981    32780605791.135693
   9       8580736361.368249    31323719065.684353
  10       8558536956.142039    30372127335.209297
 100       8544120093.395177    28786825401.178596
1000       8544192695.435946    28786840008.666389

Forging ahead with that to devise a metric to compare the dimensionality of the two results, an ad hoc choice is to set the criterion to

1.1 * stress_at_dim=100

resulting in the proposition that the SURF_match has a quasi-dimension in 5..6, while GIST_match has a quasi-dimension in 8..9. I'm curious if anyone thinks that means anything :-). Another question is whether there is any meaningful interpretation for the relative magnitudes of stress at any dimension for the two metrics. Here are some results to put it in perspective. Frac_d is the fractal dimension of the sorted distances, calculated according to Higuchi's method using code from IQM, Dim is the dimension as described above.

Method        Frac_d  Dim       stress(100)              stress(1)
Lab_CIE94     1.1458   3   2114107376961504.750000  33238672000252052.000000
Greyscale     1.0490   8        42238951082.465477      1454262245593.781250    
HS_12x12      1.0889  19        33661589105.972816      3616806311396.510254
HS_24x24      1.1298  35        16070009781.315575      4349496176228.410645    
HS_48x48      1.1854  64         7231079366.861403      4836919775090.241211
GIST          1.2312   9        28786830336.332951       997666139720.167114
HOG_250_words 1.3114  10        10120761644.659481       150327274044.045624
HOG_500_words 1.3543  13         4740814068.779779        70999988871.696045
HOG_1k_words  1.3805  15         2364984044.641845        38619752999.224922
SIFT_1k_words 1.5706  11         1930289338.112194        18095265606.237080
SURFFAST_200w 1.3829   8         2778256463.307569        40011821579.313110
SRFFAST_250_w 1.3754   8         2591204993.421285        35829689692.319153
SRFFAST_500_w 1.4551  10         1620830296.777577        21609765416.960484
SURFFAST_1k_w 1.5023  14          949543059.290031        13039001089.887533
SURFFAST_4k_w 1.5690  19          582893432.960562         5016304129.389058

Looking at the Pearson correlation between columns of the table:

                   Pearson correlation    2-tailed p-value
FracDim, Dim:     (-0.23333296587402277, 0.40262625206429864)
Dim, Stress(100): (-0.24513480360257348, 0.37854224076180676)
Dim, Stress(1):   (-0.24497740363489209, 0.37885820835053186)
Stress(100),S(1): ( 0.99999998200931084, 8.9357374620135412e-50)
FracDim, S(100):  (-0.27516440489210137, 0.32091019789264791)
FracDim, S(1):    (-0.27528621200454373, 0.32068731053608879)

I naively wonder how all correlations but one can be negative, and what conclusions can be drawn. Using this code:

import sys
import numpy as np
from scipy.stats.stats import pearsonr

file = sys.argv[1]
col1 = int(sys.argv[2])
col2 = int(sys.argv[3])

arr1 = []
arr2 = []

with open(file, "r") as ins:
    for line in ins:
        words = line.split()
        arr1.append(float(words[col1]))
        arr2.append(float(words[col2]))

narr1 = np.array(arr1)
narr2 = np.array(arr2)

# normalize
narr1 -= narr1.mean(0)
narr2 -= narr2.mean(0)

# standardize
narr1 /= narr1.std(0)
narr2 /= narr2.std(0)

print pearsonr(narr1, narr2)

On to the number of violations of the triangle inequality by the various metrics, all for the 329 pics with '11' in their sequence:

(1) n_violations/triangles 
(2) avg violation
(3) avg distance
(4) avg violation / avg distance

          n_vio    (1)        (2)            (3)          (4)

lab      186402  0.031986 157120.407286 795782.437570 0.197441

grey     126902  0.021776   1323.551315   5036.899585 0.262771
600px    120566  0.020689   1339.299040   5106.055953 0.262296

Gist      69269  0.011886   1252.289855   4240.768117 0.295298

RGB
12^3      25323  0.004345    791.203886   7305.977862 0.108295
24^3       7398  0.001269    525.981752   8538.276549 0.061603
32^3       5404  0.000927    446.044597   8827.910112 0.050527
48^3       5026  0.000862    640.310784   9095.378790 0.070400
64^3       3994  0.000685    614.752879   9270.282684 0.066314
98^3       3451  0.000592    576.815995   9409.094095 0.061304
128^3      1923  0.000330    531.054082   9549.109033 0.055613

RGB/600px
12^3      25190  0.004323    790.258158   7313.379003 0.108057
24^3       7531  0.001292    526.027221   8560.853557 0.061446
32^3       5463  0.000937    449.759107   8847.079639 0.050837
48^3       5327  0.000914    645.766473   9106.240103 0.070915
64^3       4382  0.000752    634.000685   9272.151040 0.068377
128^3      2156  0.000370    544.644712   9515.696642 0.057236

HueSat
12x12      7882  0.001353    950.321873   7555.464323 0.125779
24x24      1740  0.000299    900.577586   8227.559169 0.109459
48x48      1137  0.000195    661.389622   8653.085004 0.076434
64x64      1134  0.000195    697.298942   8776.086144 0.079454 

HueSat/600px
12x12      6898  0.001184    943.319078   7564.309456 0.124707
24x24      1790  0.000307    908.031844   8237.927256 0.110226
48x48      1267  0.000217    693.607735   8647.060308 0.080213
64x64      1289  0.000221    682.567106   8761.325172 0.077907

hog
250       53782  0.009229    675.056004   1968.357004 0.342954
500       18680  0.003205    559.354979   1431.803914 0.390665
1k         9330  0.001601    771.307074    970.307130 0.794910
4k         5587  0.000959    993.062824    650.037429 1.527701

sift
500       26466  0.004542   1267.833182   1073.692611 1.180816
1k        16489  0.002829   1598.830736    824.586293 1.938949
4k        10528  0.001807   1918.068294    533.492373 3.595306

surffast
250       38162  0.006549    630.098999   1006.401837 0.626091
500       19853  0.003407    901.724525    830.596690 1.085635
1k        10659  0.001829   1310.348063    648.191424 2.021545
4k         8988  0.001542   1488.200156    419.794008 3.545072

Anyone capable of generalizing to higher dimensions? Here is my first-timer code:

import sys
import time
import math
import numpy as np
import sortedcontainers
from sortedcontainers import SortedSet
from sklearn import manifold

seed = np.random.RandomState(seed=3)

pairs = sys.argv[1]

ss = SortedSet()

print time.strftime("%H:%M:%S"), "counting/indexing"
sys.stdout.flush()

with open(pairs, "r") as ins:
    for line in ins:
        words = line.split()
        ss.add(words[0])
        ss.add(words[1])

N = len(ss)

print time.strftime("%H:%M:%S"), "size ", N
sys.stdout.flush()

sim = np.diag(np.zeros(N))

dtot = 0.0

with open(pairs, "r") as ins:
    for line in ins:
        words = line.split()
        i = ss.index(words[0])
        j = ss.index(words[1])
        #val = math.log(float(words[2]))
        #val = math.sqrt(float(words[2]))
        val = float(words[2])
        sim[i][j] = val
        sim[j][i] = val
        dtot += val

avgd = dtot / (N * (N-1))

ntri = 0
nvio = 0
vio = 0.0

for i in xrange(1, N):
    for j in xrange(i+1, N):
        d1 = sim[i][j]
        for k in xrange(j+1, N):
            ntri += 1
            d2 = sim[i][k]
            d3 = sim[j][k]
            dd = d1 + d2
            diff = d3 - dd
            if (diff > 0.0):
                nvio += 1
                vio += diff

avgvio = 0.0
if (nvio > 0):
    avgvio = vio / nvio

print("tot: %d %f %f %f %f" % (nvio, (float(nvio)/ntri), avgvio, avgd, (avgvio/avgd)))

Here is how I tried sklearn's Isomap:

for i in [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]:
    # nbrs < points
    iso = manifold.Isomap(n_neighbors=nbrs, n_components=i,
                      eigen_solver="auto", tol=1e-9, max_iter=3000,
                      path_method="auto", neighbors_algorithm="auto")
    dis = euclidean_distances(iso.fit(sim).embedding_)
    stress = ((dis.ravel() - sim.ravel()) ** 2).sum() / 2
  • Thanks for the update. I feel that you may have misunderstood something here. Your simlarity matrix, the way it is given, is actually pointing towards a(n almost) multidimensional sphere and that would still take many "dimensions" to represent properly with low error. Except of course, if this is just an example. Perhaps the real dataset has a more diverse similarity matrix (?) – A_A Jun 17 '16 at 8:11
  • I picked distances of 1 for simplicity. You can see distributions for the real datasets here: phobrain.com/pr/home/imgdesc.html (will add dimensional results when I learn to load [i j dist] lines into a matrix). – Priot Jun 17 '16 at 8:29
  • Based on numpy, based on pandas, in the context of graph theory. Can I please ask if the response was satisfactory before we move on to answering a different topic (?) – A_A Jun 17 '16 at 9:27
  • Response is satisfactory and being applied for N=8K now (got data loaded and now calculating 1D fits for 3 cases). Open to suggestions on tweaking of MDS params. – Priot Jun 17 '16 at 12:47
  • Glad to hear that, in that case, I suppose you could accept the response as an answer to this question (?) (Ticking on the check mark below the upvote counter). Please note that depending on the nature of the data, you might get unpredictable results. Is there large diversity on the dataset or is it more or less images of similar scenes? – A_A Jun 22 '16 at 14:02
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Given a graph (say fully-connected), and a list of distances between all the points, is there an available way to calculate the number of dimensions required to instantiate the graph?

Yes. The more general topic this problem would be part of, in terms of graph theory, is called "Graph Embedding".

E.g. by construction, say we have graph G with points A, B, C and distances AB=BC=CA=1. Starting from A (0 dimensions) we add B at distance 1 (1 dimension), now we find that a 2nd dimension is needed to add C and satisfy the constraints. Does code exist to do this and spit out (in this case) dim(G) = 2?

This is almost exactly the way that Multidimensional Scaling works.

Multidimensional scaling (MDS) would not exactly answer the question of "How many dimensions would I need to represent this point cloud / graph?" with a number but it returns enough information to approximate it.

Multidimensional Scaling methods will attempt to find a "good mapping" to reduce the number of dimensions, say from 120 (in the original space) down to 4 (in another space). So, in a way, you can iteratively try different embeddings for increasing number of dimensions and look at the "stress" (or error) of each embedding. The number of dimensions you are after is the first number for which there is an abrupt minimisation of the error.

Due to the way it works, Classical MDS, can return a vector of eigenvalues for the new mapping. By examining this vector of eigenvalues you can determine how many of its entries you would need to retain to achieve a (good enough, or low error) representation of the original dataset.

The key concept here is the "similarity" matrix which is a fancy name for a graph's distance matrix (which you already seem to have), irrespectively of its semantics.

Embedding algorithms, in general, are trying to find an embedding that may look different but at the end of the day, the point cloud in the new space will end up having a similar (depending on how much error we can afford) distance matrix.

In terms of code, I am sure that there is something available in all major scientific computing packages but off the top of my head I can point you towards Python and MATLAB code examples.

E.g. if the points are photos, and the distances between them calculated by the Gist algorithm (http://people.csail.mit.edu/torralba/code/spatialenvelope/), I would expect the derived dimension to match the number image parameters considered by Gist

Not exactly. This is a very good use case though. In this case, what MDS would return, or what you would be probing with dimensionality reduction in general would be to check how many of these features seem to be required to represent your dataset. Therefore, depending on the scenes, or, depending on the dataset, you might realise that not all of these features are necessary for a good enough representation of the whole dataset. (In addition, you might want to have a look at this link as well).

Hope this helps.

  • Applying the python example to a 5-d case: – Priot Jun 17 '16 at 7:55

First, you can assume that any dataset has a dimensionality of at most 4 or 5. To get more relevant dimensions, you would need one million elements (or something like that). Apparently, you already computed a distance. Are you sure it is actually a relavnt metric? Is it efficient for images that are quite distant? Perhaps you can try Isomap (geodesic distance, starting for only close neighbors) and see if your embedded space may not actually be Euclidian.

  • The metrics are common, as seen in the results table. The only one I trust for longer distances, based on visual experience, is the Lab one. The others seem best at picking closest match. – Priot Jun 20 '16 at 23:34
  • Looking at manifold.Isomap.fit(), I see an embedding_ is created, but not sure what to do with it to get a number for the quality of the fit. – Priot Jun 23 '16 at 6:32
  • ...presumably sum the differences of distances (or distances squared) between the embedding and the original. I'm guessing there is a shorthand way to do this, and I can find it in MDS source where it calculates the stress_. – Priot Jun 27 '16 at 20:55
  • Found it - oddly isomap diverges on my hard coded 5-dimensional QA case above. It prefers 3 dimensions. Numbers for dim:stress - 1:6.4, 2:2.4, 3:1.6, 4:1.9, 5:2.6 – Priot Jun 29 '16 at 0:18
  • Isomap stress for my Lab_CIE94 329-pic case goes up directly from 1 dimension, converging in broad shoulder shape over ~100 dimensions from ~1.2e19 to ~2.2e19. Code snippet above. Runs fast :-). – Priot Jun 29 '16 at 1:00

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