6

I know using goto is something most people say to avoid, however I have read on various places that sometimes it is useful if you need simple code. Currently I have very simple program that needs to be repeated if user selects so:

static void Main()
{
    Restart:
    ...

    string UserChoice=Console.ReadLine();
    if (UserChoice=="y")
    goto Restart;
}

Is using goto here really so bad? I just cannot see any other way how to repeat the code without doing loops etc. This seems to be very straightforward and clean way. Or am I missing something?

4
  • 6
    What's wrong with loops?
    – Joe
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:13
  • Nothing is wrong with loops, I was just asking.
    – Pietro
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:19
  • 9
    Anyway, now you have other things to worry about. SCNR
    – Bobby
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:20
  • 2
    Re: XKCD sketch, that should actually happen!
    – badbod99
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:43

11 Answers 11

20
string userchoice;

do {                

    userchoice=Console.ReadLine();

} while (userchoice=="y");
5

instead write something like below.

while(Console.ReadLine() == "y")
{
.....
}

Yes using goto is bad because it makes your code less readable.

3
  • Acccording to his example, it seems that he want to do some logic before the Console.ReadLine, so this will not behave exactly as his current code, as it reads from console first, then perform the logic. Sep 24, 2010 at 9:10
  • 8
    If thats the case do { ... } while(Console.ReadLine() == "y") will work.
    – Numenor
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:12
  • Agreed. I think that is the cleanest way of doing it. Good answer! Sep 24, 2010 at 9:19
5

Of course if your code is going to do the same thing again and again, you have to add a loop. That's much better than goto.

Use something like this

string UserChoice = "y";
while( UserChoice == "y"){
  ...
  UserChoice=Console.ReadLine();
}

That should work out well for you.

9
  • -, you got some logical mistake in here: it should loop while the user does not input "y" which is wrong - it should loop while the user inputs "y"
    – user57508
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:11
  • @Andreas: Thanks. Fixed it now. Goto got to my head I guess ;) Sep 24, 2010 at 9:17
  • this does not match posters logic. Also the loop condition is always false. Sep 24, 2010 at 9:22
  • i know :) ... but the dots could stand for a method call which could be inserted before the while either ... see, 50/50 ...
    – user57508
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:29
  • @Andreas no i mean it never runs anything cause UserChoice is initialised wrongly. Sep 24, 2010 at 9:31
4

Is using goto here really so bad?

In March 1968, Dijkstra sent a letter to Communications of the ACM which was published under the title Go To Statement Considered Harmful. It is an interesting read, and part of programmer lore.

The argument against GOTO presented in this letter has to do with how programmers build a mental model to track the progress of code execution. Dijkstra argues that such a mental model is important, because the value of variables is meaningful only relative to the execution progress. For example, when our program is counting the number of times an event occurs, there is always an in-between moment where N events have occurred, but the variable keeping track of it has not yet been incremented and is still at N-1.

He goes through these steps in his reasoning against GOTO:

  1. First consider a very simple language without procedures, loops or GOTO. In such a language, the programmer can mentally track execution by imagining an execution pointer advancing from the start of the file to the end. A single index (i.e. the line number) suffices to model execution progress.

  2. Now we add procedures to the language. The execution progress can no longer be tracked by a single index, as it might be inside a procedure. We also have to keep track from which line the procedure was called. Also, procedures can be called from other procedures. Therefore, we model execution progress as a sequence of indices. (In real life, programmers call such a sequence a "stack trace".)

  3. Now we add loops to the language. For each line in our stack trace that is inside a loop body, we need to add another type of index to model execution progress: the repetition count.

  4. Now we add GOTO. Dijkstra argues that with unbridled use of GOTO, our ability to track execution progress now breaks down. We can still track execution progress with an "execution clock" by saying "now we're executing the 152nd statement". However, this is not really helpful to establish the context that is necessary to interpret the values of variables.

As long as we only use GOTO statements to build simple loops, you can argue that the situation is equivalent to point (3), and there is no problem. But in that case you can just use the loop constructs. Better to just keep GOTO out of your code, so that you don't slip into the situation described in point (4).

1
  • 3
    I would add that gotos are often considered acceptable in auto-generated machine-consumed code. Indeed for auto-generated statemachines they can be the only sensible option. Sep 24, 2010 at 12:00
3

I'd use a do/while loop:

string UserChoice = "";
do {
    ...
    UserChoice=Console.ReadLine();
} while(UserChoice == "y");
3
  • removed downvote, due to correction of halfdan ... btw: why do all the guys use "" ... :)
    – user57508
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:09
  • @Andreas maybe cause its quicker to type when making a fast answer Sep 24, 2010 at 9:20
  • @Andreas Maybe he has .Net 2? ;) Sep 24, 2010 at 9:26
2

There is one basic solution missing in the answers,

while (true)
{
    ...
    if (other-stop-condition) break;     

    ...

    string UserChoice=Console.ReadLine();
    if (UserChoice != "y") break;
}

The break statement is considered to be less structured than a pure while but more structured than a (real) goto. It should be used sparingly, but it has its uses like with the other-stop-condition

is using goto here really so bad?

Not in this simple program. But if you continue to use goto to replace loops, if/then etc your code will increase in complexity much faster than code that avoids goto.

3
  • Your replacing a goto with a break which is just another type of goto although less offensive ;) Sep 24, 2010 at 10:19
  • @Bear Monkey: Right, I forgot some comment. Sep 24, 2010 at 10:22
  • Im sure you knew that. Sometimes people use break, continue and return statements freely but then tut in horror at gotos without realizing that those flow of control statements can be just as bad as a goto. Sep 24, 2010 at 10:33
1

You could use a recursive function to do the same without loops:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
   PrintChoices();
}

private static void PrintChoices()
{
    string userChoice = Console.ReadLine();

    if (userChoice == "y")
        PrintChoices();        
}
2
  • 2
    You could (in extreme cases) run into "recursion too deep" problems, that you don't have in the loop situation. Sep 24, 2010 at 9:16
  • Sure, I recommend as always in production code, adding a limit to avoid the recursion deep limit problem. Also, I prefere the looping option however he asked to do the same without using a loop. Sep 24, 2010 at 9:20
1

Using methods instead of GOTOs is more widely accepted:

static void Main()
{
    Restart();
}

static void Restart()
{
    ...code

    string userChoice = Console.ReadLine();
    if (userChoice=="y")
        Restart();
}
4
  • 1
    C# doesn't yet optimize for tail-recursion (correct me if I'm wrong), so this would grow your call-stack. Probably not a problem if this is user-controlled (as in your example), but consider if you run Restart() thousands of times. Stack Overflow, hello?
    – Zano
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:34
  • 1
    No hard to check if tail call is implemented ildasm and check for msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… Sep 24, 2010 at 9:46
  • It' an interesting point @Zano, but 15000 user interactions seems a bit unlikely (for a console app).
    – Chris S
    Sep 24, 2010 at 10:21
  • ^ Should read 1500, obviously that depends how much code is in Restart()
    – Chris S
    Sep 24, 2010 at 10:28
1

Use a do while loop to replace your goto as its much more readable.

do 
{
...
}
while(Console.ReadLine() == "y");
0

Personally I have never had to use a goto, and like Øyvind Bråthen and Numenor have stated the loop method is by far the best way of doing this task.

However, there is one case that I can think of where a goto would be helpful

As a switch “fall through” is illegal in C# (causes a compiler error):

switch (a) 
{ 
    case 3: 
        b = 7; 
    case 4: 
        c = 3; 
        break; 
    default: 
        b = 2; 
        c = 4; 
        break; 
}

To get it to work you can use a goto:

switch (a) 
{ 
    case 3: 
        b = 7;
        goto case 4;
    case 4: 
        c = 3; 
        break; 
    default: 
        b = 2; 
        c = 4; 
        break; 
}
13
  • 1
    -, relation to the question??
    – user57508
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:13
  • 1
    damn ... read the question: Is using goto here really so bad? I just cannot see any other way how to repeat the code without doing loops etc.... how does your answer capture loops?? so it should rather be a comment
    – user57508
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:15
  • 1
    once again, repeating myself: your answer provides some more info about goto, but this was not asked... the question was: Is using goto **here** really so bad? I just cannot see any other way how to repeat the code without doing loops etc. ... you're off the subject!
    – user57508
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:42
  • 1
    the more you argue about, the more you agree with my objection and downvote :) your answer should be a simple comment, that what they are for
    – user57508
    Sep 24, 2010 at 9:55
  • 2
    @jimplode: I actually liked your answer. I just recently started coding in C# after spending years coding in C++ and I was quite surprised that C# doesn't allow switch case fall throughs as they can sometimes be quite nifty and useful. I like your work around for that.
    – Ayush
    Sep 24, 2010 at 12:18
0
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int add;
        try
        {
            ArrayList al = new ArrayList();
        t:
            Console.Write("Enter the Number of elements do you want to insert in arraylist");
            int n = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            Console.WriteLine("Enter the Values:");
            for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            {
                al.Add(Console.ReadLine());

            }
            foreach (var a in al)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("valus:" + a);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Add another number yes:1 ");
            add = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            while (add == 1)
            {
                goto t;

            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enter the Valid Number and try again");
        }
        Console.ReadKey();


    }
}

}

1
  • This Code is Goto statement using Dynamic Arraylist insert element according to user requirement in c# console Application Mar 11, 2018 at 9:25

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