1
function each(collection, callback) {
  var arr = [];
  for(var i = 0; i < collection.length; i++) {
      var result = callback(collection[i])
      if (typeof result !== 'undefined') {
        arr.push(callback(collection[i]));
      }
    }
  return arr
}

function isNumber(item) {
    if (typeof item === "number") {
      return item * 2;
    }
}

I am trying to understand higher order functions. The above works, but is apparently not best practice to return a value with isNumber. I have been told that a Boolean value should be returned. Why? It works.

Update: It appears to be because of the function name! Thanks everyone I just thought there might be some technical reason

  • Where did this warning come from? – Juan Mendes Jun 16 '16 at 14:17
  • 3
    As far as I can tell, it's just a case of your naming. isNumber is almost question-like, where the answer would be yes/no, or a boolean. Your code would almost read like: isNumber(5) == 10, which just reads wrong. I also don't see the relevance of the each function within the context of this question at all. – Hopeful Llama Jun 16 '16 at 14:19
  • @JuanMendes I wasn't told personally (just put that for simplification) In this example here stackoverflow.com/questions/31169722/… . Thanks! – mattnewbie Jun 16 '16 at 14:19
  • 7
    Functions beginning with is are always going to carry the expectation of a boolean result, something either is or isn't. – Alex K. Jun 16 '16 at 14:19
  • 2
    Why should a function called isNumber(item) double the number? Shouldn't a function that doubles a number be called doubleNumber or multiplyNumberByTwo or something that wouldn't surprise another programmer? – Ghost Jun 16 '16 at 14:19
1

If a function is called isNumber, it should return a boolean.

Also, your each function is a map not an each. In that case your code should probably look like.

function flatMap(collection, callback) {
  var arr = [];
  for(var i = 0; i < collection.length; i++) {
      var result = callback(collection[i])
      if (typeof result !== 'undefined') {
        arr.push(callback(collection[i]));
      }
    }
  return arr;
}

function times2(item) {
    if (typeof item === "number") {
      return item * 2;
    }
    return item;
}

map([1,2,3,"hello"], times2);

If you wanted iteration that can be stopped, then it would look like

function iterate(collection, callback) {
  for(var i = 0; i < collection.length; i++) {
    var result = callback(collection[i])
    if (typeof result === false) {
      return;
    }
  }
}

function doSomethingAndStopIfNotANumber(item) {
   console.log(item);
   return typeof item == "number";
}

iterate([1,2,3, "hello", 4, 5], doSomethingAndStopIfNotANumber);

Note that Array.prototype.forEach does not allow you to stop iteration by returning false, for that you'd need to misuse Array.prototype.every (because that function returns a boolean, so it's just a semantic problem, not like map where you build an array and throw it away) or write a function like I did above.

  • What is the difference between each and map? – tpdietz Jun 16 '16 at 14:21
  • Thank-you . I thought the answer would be more complicated than that! It's not my code, I found it on this site in another question, I'm trying to understand about higher order functions and wanted to clarify this point. Thanks for your time! stackoverflow.com/questions/31169722/… – mattnewbie Jun 16 '16 at 14:22
  • 1
    FWIW, since your map function will only push the result of the callback if it's defined, I'd say it's more like flatMap instead. I think it's an important invariant that map preserves the size of the collection. – Andrzej Doyle Jun 16 '16 at 14:24
  • 1
    map is for when you want to transform each item of an array and return a new array. each is when you just want to do something to each item, but don't want a new array with the "mapped" result. Using map when you mean each means that an array will be created, modified and then thrown away. – Juan Mendes Jun 16 '16 at 14:25

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