39

I'm taking the Udacity course on deep learning and I came across the following code:

def reformat(dataset, labels):
    dataset = dataset.reshape((-1, image_size * image_size)).astype(np.float32)
    # Map 0 to [1.0, 0.0, 0.0 ...], 1 to [0.0, 1.0, 0.0 ...]
    labels = (np.arange(num_labels) == labels[:,None]).astype(np.float32)
    return dataset, labels

What does labels[:,None] actually do here?

41

http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/arrays.indexing.html

numpy.newaxis

The newaxis object can be used in all slicing operations to create an axis of length one. :const: newaxis is an alias for ‘None’, and ‘None’ can be used in place of this with the same result.

http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy-1.10.1/reference/generated/numpy.expand_dims.html

Demonstrating with part of your code

In [154]: labels=np.array([1,3,5])

In [155]: labels[:,None]
Out[155]: 
array([[1],
       [3],
       [5]])
 
In [157]: np.arange(8)==labels[:,None]
Out[157]: 
array([[False,  True, False, False, False, False, False, False],
       [False, False, False,  True, False, False, False, False],
       [False, False, False, False, False,  True, False, False]], dtype=bool)

In [158]: (np.arange(8)==labels[:,None]).astype(int)
Out[158]: 
array([[0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0]])
0
29

None is an alias for NP.newaxis. It creates an axis with length 1. This can be useful for matrix multiplcation etc.

>>>> import numpy as NP
>>>> a = NP.arange(1,5)
>>>> print a
[1 2 3 4]
>>>> print a.shape
(4,)
>>>> print a[:,None].shape
(4, 1)
>>>> print a[:,None]
[[1]
 [2]
 [3]
 [4]]    
2
  • 2
    So it does the same as np.reshape(a, (-1,1)) assuming a is of shape (n,) where n is an arbitrary integer?
    – WiseDev
    Oct 21 '18 at 10:29
  • @BlueRineS Yes.
    – Hari
    Nov 29 '20 at 12:24
10

to explain it in plain english, it allows operations between two arrays of different number of dimensions.

It does this by adding a new, empty dimension which will automagically fit the size of the other array.

So basically if:

Array1 = shape[100] and Array2 = shape[10,100]

Array1 * Array2 will normally give an error.

Array1[:,None] * Array2 will work.

0
4

I came here after having the exact same problem doing the same Udacity course. What I wanted to do is transpose the one dimensional numpy series/array which does not work with numpy.transpose([1, 2, 3]). So I wanted to add you can transpose like this (source):

numpy.matrix([1, 2, 3]).T

It results in:

matrix([[1],
        [2],
        [3]])

which is pretty much identical (type is different) to:

x=np.array([1, 2, 3])
x[:,None]

But I think it's easier to remember...

3

If you see code from experienced NumPy users, you will often see them use a special slicing syntax instead of calling reshape.

x = v[None, :]

or

x = v[:, None]

Those lines create a slice that looks at all of the items of v but asks NumPy to add a new dimension of size 1 for the associated axis.

1
  • Content is from Udacity's Deep Learning Nanodegree Program. Sep 6 '19 at 15:37
0

(To clarify the answer by @GWW and the comment by @BlueRine S) While working with numpy arrays it is a good idea to clearly treat one dimensional arrays as row or column vectors. This has been pointed out by Andrew Ng also, to avoid bugs in the code.

>>> import numpy as NP
>>> a = NP.arange(1,5)
>>> a
array([1, 2, 3, 4])
>>> a.shape
(4,)
>>> a[:,None].shape
(4, 1)
>>> a[:,None]
array([[1],
       [2],
       [3],
       [4]])
>>> a[None,:].shape
(1, 4)
>>> a[None,:]
array([[1, 2, 3, 4]])
>>> np.reshape(a, (1, -1))
array([[1, 2, 3, 4]])
>>> np.reshape(a, (-1, 1))
array([[1],
       [2],
       [3],
       [4]])

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.