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Common Lisp has an atom predicate, but Clojure doesn't seem to have an equivalent - atom in Clojure is a completely different thing.

In ANSI Common Lisp, Paul Graham defines it as (not (consp x)).

Would (not (coll? x)) be the correct implementation?

I'm not very used to the collection abstraction yet.

Edit:

I'd need this predicate for a function to copy a tree, for example:

(defn our-copy-tree
  [tr]
  (if-not (coll? tr)
    tr
    (cons (our-copy-tree (first tr))
          (our-copy-tree (rest tr)))))

Is this right?

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  • depends on how would you like to treat java arrays and collections: they are not colls, so (not (coll? (int-array 1))) would return true.
    – leetwinski
    Jun 16, 2016 at 22:08
  • if you would like to treat them as colls , not atoms, check this function from old contrib: github.com/clojure/clojure-contrib/blob/… this complexity, is the consequence of clojure's "sequability" thing: almost all the functions working with collections make seqs from Iterable, java.util.Collection, or java arrays, so I wouldn't treat them as atoms in clojure terms..
    – leetwinski
    Jun 16, 2016 at 22:21
  • oh, forgot about strings! do you treat them as atoms or collections? In fact the whole atom thing is much more fuzzy in clojure, then in common lisp, because clojure chooses the way of sequences unification, while in common lisp only cons cell is not an atom.
    – leetwinski
    Jun 16, 2016 at 22:29
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    What atom means in common lisp and what atom means in Clojure are not the same. What do you intend to mean here? It might make sense to describe the CL meaning explicitly in the question [if that's what you want], so folks coming from a Clojure background aren't confused. Jun 17, 2016 at 13:17
  • (see also: stackoverflow.com/questions/3665132/…) Jun 17, 2016 at 13:18

4 Answers 4

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In general Clojure doesn't depend fundamentally on cons cells and atoms as other Lisps do. In fact you often end up using vectors and maps far more than actual lists in Clojure (if you leave out the act of actually writing Clojure code). That's why the word "atom" is used to refer to an STM concept in Clojure. The traditional Lisp concept just isn't as useful.

So you taking the negation of coll? is a reasonable approximation of a Lisp atom, but Lisp atoms are generally a foreign concept in Clojure.

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Yeah, so it turns out coll? would not be the Clojure equivalent to Common Lisp consp.

The reason is that the empty list () is a coll, so I was getting a stack overflow - while with CL (consp '()); => false).

The right answer is also to check if the tr is empty, thusly:

(defn our-copy-tree
  [tr]
  (if (or (not (coll? tr)) (empty? tr))
    tr
    (cons (our-copy-tree (first tr))
          (our-copy-tree (rest tr)))))
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atoms in Clojure are completely different as you noted. At first I checked the class instance:

(defn atom? [x] (instance? clojure.lang.Atom x))

However that may be relying on implementation details. Instead, I now use the Clojure interface:

(defn atom? (instance? clojure.lang.IAtom x))

Note, there is a corresponding protocol in cljs: cljs.core/IAtom

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    This is answering according to the Clojure meaning of atom, vs the CL meaning; I gather the question to be asking the other. See stackoverflow.com/questions/3665132/… Jun 17, 2016 at 13:20
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    I found this page because I wanted a predicate that would identify Clojure atoms, so although this answer doesn't answer OP's (somewhat confusingly worded) question, it answers mine. It works, but it's Clojure-specific; in Clojurescript (defn atom? [x] (instance? cljs.core/Atom x)) seems to work.
    – Mars
    Jan 5, 2017 at 21:32
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First the quick answer:

(def atomic? (complement coll?))
(map atomic? [0 "hi" [] {}]) => (true true false false)

But as @leetwinksi and @efraimmgon observed, the answer depends on what you consider an atom. For example, one could also define an atom as not-seqable? (i.e. (complement seqable?)), which would further restrict what was considered atomic, since many types including strings can be treated as sequences.

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  • (atomic? (int-array 1)) => true , (atomic? (java.util.ArrayList.)) => true
    – leetwinski
    Jun 16, 2016 at 22:23
  • because (map coll? [(java.util.ArrayList.) (int-array 1)]) => (false false)
    – Adam Lee
    Jun 16, 2016 at 22:30
  • Thanks for pointing out that edge-case. But am I right in thinking that it's still a reasonable definition, because it mirrors the functionality of the built-in coll?.
    – Adam Lee
    Jun 16, 2016 at 22:31
  • i know that, that's the reason i wrote a comment: they are not coll? but still they are sequable. So are they atoms or not?
    – leetwinski
    Jun 16, 2016 at 22:32
  • depends on what you consider to be an atom. For example map treats java arrays (and strings and a bunch of other stuff) as collections (as lots of other clojure functions do). Is it atom then? or collection?
    – leetwinski
    Jun 16, 2016 at 22:34

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